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Full text of "Halcyon"

1 I 






A 
L 
C 
Y 

O 





MALCOLM B. PETRIKIN, 

Business Manager 





HALCYOTSf 

19 2 8 



THE JUNIOFL CIJ^SS 

SVs/ARTH>/IOR<E 
C O L L E G E 




iWorrig %. Clott)icr, '90 

TO WHOM WE CAN RENDER NO HIGHER PRAISE 

THAN TO SAY THAT 

HIS GREAT GENEROSITY TO SWARTHMORE COLLEGE 

HAS EARNED HIM NOT ONLY THE GRATITUDE, 

BUT THE LOVE AND RESPECT OF ALL 

SWARTHMOREANS, THE CLASS OF 1928 

AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATES THIS, 

THE FORTY-THIRD HALCYON 



Page Four 




Page Fite 





^O YOU WHO HAVE GONE, 

MAY THIS Halcyon re- 
fresh, FOR a moment, MEMORIES 
OF A PLEASANT PAST ; TO YOU WHO 
ARE HERE, MAY IT TEMPER WITH 
A TOUCH OF ROMANCE THE COM- 
MONPLACES OF COLLEGE LIFE; TO 
YOU WHO ARE TO COME, MAY ITS 
RECORD OF ACHIEVEMENT PROVE 
OF HELP IN BUILDING THE 
SWARTHMORE OF THE FUTURE. 



Page Six 




COLLEGE 

CLASSES 

CAMPUS 

ATHLETICS 

FEATURE 




Vage Seven 




The Staff 

Editor-in-Chief Ellis G. Bishop 

Business Manager Malcolm B. Petrikin 

. . [Grace E. McHenry 

Assistants w -i^ r- 

\Louis K. Clothier 

, r-7- [Anne H. Phillips 

Associate tditors <-tr ^ t> 

(Vincent G. Bush 

r . r-7- [Elisabeth A. Jenkins 

iinior tditors < -rx ^ t. 

■' [Vincent G. Bush 

Assistant Ruey M. Sieger 

r- r-j- [Mary T. Sullivan 

Feature Editors, l^^^^^^^^^^ D. MacDougal 

. ,, . r- I- [Gertrude M. Tolls 

Athletic tditors \ -p ij t -c^ ^,,„ 

[Ihomas H. L. rOSTER 

Assistant Mary M. Livezy 

Art Editor Anne Kennedy 

Assistant Mary Wright 

n, ^, . T-,. [MyRA CoNOVER 

Fboto2raphtc tditorsi r~ c xt t 

o '^ [Theodore b. NicKLES, Jr. 

Assistant William C. McCook 



Page Eight 




The College 



Page Nine 



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HALCYO^ 



Board of Managers 



President Wilson M. Powell 

Vice-President '. Charles F. Jenkins 

Secretary Hetty Lippincott Miller 

Treasurer E. Pusey Passmore 

TERM EXPIRES DECEMBER, 1927 

Edward Martin, M. D Philadelphia, Pa. 

Wilson M. Powell New York, N. Y. 

William M. Cocks Westbury, L. I., N. Y. 

Lucy Biddle Lewis Lansdowne, Pa. 

Philip M. Sharpless ' . . . . West Chester, Pa. 

Mary Hibbard Thatcher Swarthmore, Pa. 

Mary Wharton Mendelson Germantown, Pa. 

Isaac H. Clothier, Jr Philadelphia, Pa. 



TERM EXPIRES DECEMBER, 1928 

Emma C. Bancroft ■ Wilmington, Del 

Charles F. Jenkins Philadelphia, Pa, 

Harriett Cox McDowell Brooklyn, N. J 

Abigail Foulke Pim Philadelphia, Pa 

Robert H. Walker Baltimore, Md 

T. Stockton Matthews Baltimore, Md 

Mary Lippincott Griscom '. Moorestown, N. J 

E. Pusey Passmore Philadelphia, Pa 



TERM EXPIRES DECEMBER, 1929 

Johanna Wharton Lippincott Philadelphia, Pa. 

Howard Cooper Johnson Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hetty Lippincott Miller Riverton, N. J. 

Elsie Palmer Brown Washington, D. C. 

Henry C. Turner New York, N. Y. 

Daniel Underbill Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Esther H. Cornell Brooklyn, N. J. 

Robert E. Lamb Philadelphia, Pa. 



TERM EXPIRES DECEMBER, 1930 

Rebecca C. Longstreth Haverford, Pa. 

William C. Sproul Chester, Pa. 

Caroline H. Worth Coatesville, Pa. 

Robert Pyle West Grove, Pa. 

Joseph Swain Wallingford, Pa. 

Edward B. Temple Swarthmore, Pa. 

Walter Roberts, M. D Philadelphia, Pa. 

Frances M. White Cardington, Pa. 



Page Twenty 




'halcyo^ 




Administration, 192.7 

Frank Aydelotte A.M., L.H.D., Litt.B., LL.D. 
President of the College 

Raymond Walters, M.A. Frances B. Blanshard, M.A. Ethel Hampson Brewster, Ph.D. 
Dean Acting Dean of Women Dean of Women on Sabbatical Leave 



OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

Vice-President John Anthony Miller, Ph.D., F.R.A.S. 

Librarian John Russel Hayes, A.B., LL.B. 

Comptroller Nicholas O. Pittenger, A.B. 

Superintetident Chester Roberts 

Assistant to the Dean of Women . . Ella Michener 

Alumni Recorder Caroline Augusta Lukens, B.L. 

Dietitian Anne C. Brierley 

Assistant Librarian Alice W. Swayne 



Ihalcyon 




Men's Student Government 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Both Semesters 



President 

Secretary Edward C. McFeely, '28 

Norman H. Winde, '27 George Wilson McKeag, '27 

Theodore Smithers, '28 




P. BuRDETTE Lewis, '27 



Page Tirenly-lwo 




JmAJuCYO^ 




Women's Student Government 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Lois Thompson, '27 

Vice-President Gertrude Jolls, '28 

Secretary H. Caroline Robison, '29 

Treasurer Elizabeth S. McCabe, '27 

Frances D. McCafferty, '27 Esther Felter, '28 

R. Esther Howard, '27 Margaret Somerville, '28 

Eleanor Jenkins, '30 



^HALCYO^ 




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I^ALCYO^ 



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-X 



Department of English 

Harold Clarke Goddard, Ph.D., Alexander Grnivold Cummins Pro- 
fessor of English. 

Frank P. Day, M.A., Professor of English. 

Philip Marshall Hicks, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Roy Petran Lingle, A.M., Litt. B., Assistant Professor of English. 

Robert Ernest Spiller, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Amphilis Throckmorton Middlemore, Instructor in English. (On 
Leave'). 

Frederic S. Klees, A.B., Instructor in English. 

Frank C. Baxter, M.A., Part-time Instructor in English. 

MacEdward Leach, A.M., Part-time Instructor in English. 

Raymond Walters, M.A., Dean, Tutor in English Honors. 

Department of German 

Clara Price Newport, Ph.D., Professor of the Germati Language and 

Literature. 
Jean H. Creighton, A.B., Part-time Instructor in German. 

Department of Mathematics and Astronomy 

John Anthony Miller, Ph.D., F.R.A.S., Edicard H. Magill Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics and Astronomy . 

Ross W. Marriott, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

John Himes Pitman, A.M., Assistant Professor of Mathetnatics and 
Astronomy . 

Dean B. McLaughlin, M.S., Instructor in Mathematics and Astronomy. 

Emma T. R. Williams, A.B., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Alice M. Rogers, A.B., Instructor in Mathematics. 

\\'alter Antonio Matos, B.A., F.R.A.S., Volunteer Observer in the 
Sp-oul Observatory. 

Marjorie Onderdonk Battin, A.B., Research Assistant in Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy . 

Department of French and Spanish 

IsABELLE Bronk, Ph.D., Susan W . Lippincott Professor of the French 

Language and Literature. 
Charles R. Bagley, A.M., B.Litt., Assistant Professor of French. 
Blanche J. Poulleau Crawford, C.A.P., Instructor in French. (On 

Leave') 
Marie-Emma Bourdin Bacher, Instructor in French. 
Mercedes C. Iribas, Instructor in Spanish. 
Philip E. Douglass, A.B., Part-time Instructor in Spanish. 

Department of Pohtical Science 

Robert Clarkson Brooks, Ph.D. , Joseph Wharton Professor of Political 

Science. 
Richard M. Perdew, A.B., Instructor in Political Science. 



Page Twenty-six 



f^ALCYO^ 



Department of Economics 

Herbert Fraser, M.A., Associate Professor of Econoinics. 

James A. Ross, Jr., B.S., B.A., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Claude C. Smith, LL.B., Instructor in Law. 

S. W. Johnson, Lecturer in Accounting. 

Charles P. White, A.M., Lecturer in Public Finance. 



Department of Biology 

Spencer Trotter, M.D., Emeritus Professor of Biology. 

Samuel Copeland Palmer, Ph.D., Professor of Biology. 

Detlev W. Bronk, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physiology and 

Biophysics. 
Frank G. Speck, A.M., Lecturer in Anthropology . 
Alfred Irving Hallowell, M.Sc, Ph.D., Lecturer in Anthropology. 
Howard K. Henry, B.Sc, Laboratory Assistant in Biology. 

Department of Greek and Latin 

Henrietta Josephine Meeteer, Ph.D., Emeritus Professor of Greek 

and Latin. 
Douglas Laurel Drew, M.A., Professor of Greek. 
Ethel Hampson Brewster, Ph.D., Dean of Women and Associate 

Professor of Greek and Latin. (On Leave') 

Department of Chemistry 

Gellert Alleman, Ph.D., Professor of Chetnistry. 

Henry Jermain Maude Creighton, M.A., M.Sc, D.Sc, Associate 

Professor of Cheifiistry. 
Edward H. Cox, M.A., D.Sc, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 



Department of History 

William Isaac Hull, Ph.D., F.R.H.S., Howard M. Jenkitis Professor 

of Quaker History. 
Frederick J. Manning, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

Department of Public Speaking 

Everett L. Hunt, M.A., Professor of Public Speaking. 

Paul M. Pearson, Litt.D., Honorary Lecturer in Public Speaking. 

Department of Philosophy and Religion 

Jesse Herman Holmes, ¥h.D., Professor of Philosophy. 
Brand Blanshard, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy. 
George Emerson Barnes, D.D., Lecturer in Biblical Literature. 








^\LCYON 





Department of Physics 

George Arthur Hoadley, D.Sc, Emeritus Professor of Physics. 
WiNTHROP R. Wright, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 
Alfred H. Croup, B.S., Instructor in Physics. 



Department of Civil Engineering 

Weston Earle Fuller, C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Errol Weber Doebler, C.E., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Department of Electrical Engineering 

Lewis Fussell, E.E., Ph.D., Professor of Electrical Engineering. (On 

heave) 
Howard Malcolm Jenkins, A.B., E.E., Assistant Professor of 

Electrical Engineering. 
Edward H. Lange, M.E., Instructor in Electrical Engineering. 






Department of Mechanical Engineering 

Charles Garrett Thatcher, M.E., Assistant Professor of Mechanical 

Engineering. 
Andrew Simpson, M.E., Resident Engineer and Instructor in Mechanical 

Engineering. 

Department of Education 

Will Carson Ryan, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Education. 
Frances M. Burlingame, Ed.M., Ed.D., Instructor in Education. 
Edith M. Everett, M.A., Lecturer in Education. 
Arthur W. Ferguson, Ph.D., Lecturer in Education. 



Department of Fine Arts 

Alfred M. Brooks, A.M., Professor of Line Arts. 
Alfred J. S'wan, Lecturer and Director of Music. 



Department of Physical Education 

Eugene LeRoy Mercer, M.D., Associate Professor of Physical Edu- 

catioyi. 
Elizabeth F. Lanning, A.B., Instructor in Physical Education and 

Director of Physical Education of the Women. 
E. Winifred Chapman, Assistant in the Physical Education of Women. 
Eleanor H. Balph, M.D., Lecturer in Hygiene. 
Frank Fitts, Assistant in the Physical Education of Men. 
Robert Dunn, Assistant in the Physical Education of Men. 



Page Twenty-eight 



7/hALCYO"N 





The Swarthmore Alumni Association 

SINCE 1875 the Alumni Association has been the tie that binds all the 
graduates of the college irrespective of membership in the smaller alumni 
clubs. Alumni Day is the one day in the year when every group is united and 
the emphasis is laid on class reunions rather than fraternity or club reunions. 
Interested at all times in promoting the college welfare, the Alumni 
Association finds its greatest outlet in the Commencement Week Activities. 
Last year a buffet supper and business meeting were held on Alumni Eve. 
Saturday, Alumni Day saw special reunions of '76, '81, '86, '91, '96, '01, 
'06, '11, '16, '21, and '24. Some reunion classes had special luncheons. Fol- 
lowing the reunion there was the usual parade in costumes of the period. 
The Alumni Supper was held in the college dining room that evening with 
the graduating class as guests of honor. On the opposite side of the dining 
room, a less hilarious but just as loyal group was celebrating its fiftieth anni- 
versary with a huge cake, decorated with candles. The Supper broke up after 
the singing of college songs. So does the oldest of all Swarthmore Clubs 
serve to bring back with renewed interest those who have passed their college 
days forever. 



OFFICERS FOR 1926-27 



President Claude C. Smith, '14 

Barclay White, '06 

Vice-President Rebecca Webb Holmes, '89 

Edith Verlenden Paschall, '02 

Secretary-Treasurer Abby Mary Hall Roberts, '90 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



1925-27 
Claude C. Smith, '14 
J. Serrill Verlenden, '99 
Lydia Green Hawkins, '93 



1926-28 
Anna L. Curtis, '04 
Martha T. Speakman, '14 
Leon M. Pearson, '20 




^ALCYON 



The Swarthmore Alumnae Club of Philadelphia 

THE Swarthmore Alumnae Club of Philadelphia is an organization of 
Swarthmore women living near Philadelphia. At the meetings held 
three times a year, interest is stimulated in constructive plans for aiding 
and improving the college. The Club regularly contributes to the Bureau of 
Occupations, which aids college women to obtain advantageous positions. 
The New York and Philadelphia alumnae have combined in raising money 
for an open scholarship for women. The Club is actively engaged in aiding 
the endowment for the Women's Student Building. 

OFFICERS FOR 1926-27 

President Emma Jane Shoemaker, '06 

Vice-President Gertrude Wood Thatcher, '14 

Secretary Caroline A. Lukens, '98 

Treasurer Edith Power Paxson, '07 

DIRECTORS 

Elizabeth Shoemaker Grzybowski, '16 Anna D. White, '12 

Dorothy Strode Richardson, '12 Eliza Ulrich Ullman, '16 

Josephine Zartmen, '24 



The Swarthmore Club of Philadelphia 

THE interests of the Swarthmore Club of Philadelphia are largely social. 
It holds a luncheon on the first Wednesday of each month, at which 
time the members are addressed by prominent speakers. Matters pertaining 
to the best interests of Swarthmore are considered at these meetings, and 
recommendations are often made to the President of the College and the 
Board of Managers. The Club enjoys a membership of approximately two 
hundred and twenty-five. This year according to custom, the Club held the 
annual Swarthmore dinner at the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel on Saturday, 
March 26th. Several hundred alumni from Philadelphia attended the dinner 
which proved a decided success. 

OFFICERS FOR 1926-27 

President George H. Brooke, '93 

Vice-President Claude C. Smith, '14 

Treasurer Sewell W. Hodge, '16 

Secretary Herbert L. Hutchinson, '22 



re=: 



J^alcyon" 



The S^varthmore Club of New York 

ONE of the college's oldest alumni organizations is the Swarthmore Club 
of New York, which, at present, has a membership of more than one 
hundred and fifty. The Club functions largely as a social organization. A 
smoker was held early this year when Mr. Wilson Powell, Dr. Philip Hicks 
and Dr. E. LeRoy Mercer recounted the latest Swarthmore news and explained 
plans for the future of the college. Two more get-togethers are planned for 
the coming year. 

OFFICERS FOR 1926-27 

President Fred N. Price, '05 

Vice-President Wm. J. Bradley, '09 

Secretary-Treasurer L. S. Ayars, Jr., '24 

BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

Henry B. Seaman, '81 J. S. Wetherald, '15 

J. Hibbard Taylor, .'03 Raymond C. Michener, '19 

Clement M. Biddle, '96 Alan C. Valentine, '21 

Scott B. Lilly Chester G. A. Zucker, '24 

F. M. McDowell, '13 George B. Jackson, '21 



The Swarthmore Women's Club of New York 

TEN years ago the Women's Club of New York was organized with the 
purpose of keeping the Swarthmore alumnae in touch with the college 
and of promoting its interest and support whenever possible. The club 
now has a paid membership of over one hundred. A luncheon is held in the 
fall when some representative from Swarthmore is invited to bring the club 
the latest news. A Tea and Business Meeting are held in the spring. The 
Club contributes fifty dollars annually to the support of the Alumnae open 
scholarship. 

OFFICERS FOR 1926-27 

President Irvana Wood Tyson, '10 

Vice-President . . ■ Margaret Seaman, '89 

Secretary-Treasurer Phebe U. Seaman, '19 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Elizabeth B. Biddle, '25 Anna Miller Smith, '15 

Gladys Griffen Van Name, '16 Virginia Packard Hart, 'ex. '21 

Alice Linvill, '02 




The Western S^varthmore Club 

THE Western Swarthmore Club was organized in 1903 by a group of Alumni 
living in or about Chicago. It began as a Club of Chicago Alumni, but 
soon expanded to include in its membership all graduates and former students 
of Swarthmore College who resided west of the Allegheny Mountains. An 
annual meeting and banquet is held in Chicago during the early part of each 
year, and noon-day luncheons are held from time to time upon special an- 
nouncement. In 1906 the Club decided to offer a scholarship to Swarthmore 
College. The purpose of the scholarship was three-fold: (1) to stimulate 
interest in Swarthmore College and her ideals among residents of the western 
states; (2) to promote the best interests of Swarthmore College by sending 
to her campus students of well-rounded character and ability who would 
carry with them the spirit and ideals of the west; and (3) to create for the Club 
itself a unifying interest and a worthwhile purpose. Funds for the scholarship 
are accumulated by voluntary subscriptions of club members. The plan has 
operated with marked success for twenty years, and selection as a Western 
Swarthmore Club Scholar has become an outstanding honor. 



OFFICERS FOR 1926-27 



President Harry A. Olin, '19 

Arthur G. Hoadley, '02 

Vice-Presidents ' David D. Rowlands, '09 

James J. Schock, '13 

Treasurer E. Tasso Morgan, '17 

Secretary Allin H. Pierce, '19 



Swarthmore College Club of Southern 
California 

AT the suggestion of Ellen Evans Price, the Swarthmore College Club 
l\. of Southern California was formed six years ago with seventeen mem- 
bers. Since then the membership of the club has steadily increased. Two 
regular meetings are held a year, a banquet in January and a picnic in mid- 
summer. All Swarthmoreans visiting in California at the time of these 
gatherings are expected to attend. 



OFFICERS FOR 1927 

President Samuel Duncan Yeo, ex. -'99 

Vice-President Fred G. Young, '13 

Secretary-Treasurer Charlotte E. Moore, '20 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Howard H. Carpenter, ex. -'05 Edith Dixcn Hopkins, ex. -'04 




CI 



asses 



Page Thirty-five 



TlALCYO^ 



SENIORS 




^ALCYO^ 




Senior Officers 

First Semester Second Semester 

Charles E. Rickards Presidetit John H. Lippincott, Jr. 

Katharine J. Snyder Vice-President Lois Thompson 

M. Marcia Perry Secretary R. Esther Howard 

Robert B. Clothier Treasurer Edward F. Lang 




TTalcyo^ 



p*«*^ * 



JOHN UNDERWOOD AYRES Wharton Club 
324 S. 45th St., Philadelphia, Pa. Physics 

"A slippery sleuth was he." 
West Philadelphia High School. Glee Club (II, III). 



y^ 



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WILLIAM HERMAN BARCUS Wharton Club 
Darby, Pa. Chemistry 

"i^(?r he was an admirer of fair nature " 
Darby High School. 



LEROY GILBERT BAUM * A O 

Mountain Ave., Summit, N. J. General Engineering 

"Curly locks and an eagle eye" 

Summit High School. Basketball Squad (I), Varsity (II, 
III, IV); Baseball Squad (II), Varsity (III, IV); Track Squad 
(I); Engineers' Club; "S" Club, Treasurer (II). 




II 



THOMAS GREENWOOD BEST K S 

Medicine Lodge, Kan. Economics 

"If faith removes mountains, here's a job for faith " 

George School. Football Varsity (I, II, III, IV); Varsity 
Swimming (I, II); Lacrosse Squad (I, II); "S" Club. 




GEORGE MARTIN BOOTH A T 
975 Cedar Brook Road, Plainfield, N. J. Economics 

"Yet I have postponed my serious business for their sport." 
Plainfield High School. 



CECILE AMEDEE BROCHEREUX X O 

528 Fayette St., Conshohocken, Pa. French Honors 

"Who knows her smile has known perfection." 

Conshohocken High School. Class Hockey (I, II); Glee 
Club (I, II, III), Secretary (III); Business Staff, Portfolio (II); 
1917 Halcyon Staff (III); French Club (I, II, III, IV), Secretary 
and Treasurer (III), President (IV); Hamburg Show (II, III, 
IV). 




S^ALCYO^ 






MAY GERTRUDE BROWN 

320 Cornell Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. English Honors 

"She can play any game and work like a Trojan." 

Swarthmore High School. Class Hockev (I, II, III, IV); 
Varsity Hockey Squad (III); Class Basketball (II, III, IV); 
Class Gym Team (I, II); Athletic Council (III, IV); Phcenix 
(I, II, III), Intercollegiate Editor (IV); 7927 Halcyon Staff; 
Glee Club (I, II); May Day (III); Varsity Debate (II). 



CICELY CUSHMAN BROWNE 

State College Station, Raleigh, N. C. Classics 

"Toil is the true knighfs pleasure." 

Raleigh High School. Classical Club (II, III, IV); Sec- 
retary (III); Glee Club (I); Chorus (IV); Class Basketball 
(III). 



CAROLYN COOK BUCKWELL X Q 

874 Greene Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. History 

"Wisely worldly, but not worldly wise." 

Brooklvn Friends' School. Manager Varsitv Hockev; 
Little Theatre Club; Glee Club (I, II); Varsity 'Basketball 
Squad (I, II); Class Hockey (I, II); Athletic Council (IV); 
Class Swimming (I, II); I.C.S.A. (I); Hamburg Show (II, 
IV); Freshman Show; May Day (I). 



ELL WOOD RICHARD BURDSALL * K * 

381 Irving Ave., Port Chester, N. Y. English 

"Laugh, sing, and be jolly, for tomorrow we graduate." 

Brunswick School. Football Squad (I, II); Baseball Squad 
(I, III); Manager (IV); Associate Editor, 1927 Halcyon; Class 
Treasurer (III-2); Y.M.C.A. Cabinet (III, IV); Musical 
Clubs (I, II, III, IV), Manager (IV); Omicron Omega; Kwink. 



JAMES WRIGHT CHAPMAN * A G 
Pleasantville, N. Y. Engineering 

"Always serious but never sad." 

Pleasantville High School. Football Squad (I, II); La- 
crosse Squad (I, II, III); Phani.x Staff (I, II, III), Assistant 
Editor (IV); Glee Club (I, 11, IV); Instrumental Club (I, II, 
III); Engineers' Club; Sigma Xi; Sigma Tau; Omicron 
Omega. 



ALBERT CAIRNS CLIFF K 2 

2021 E. Cambria St., Philadelphia, Pa. Political Science 

"A life of ups and downs." 

Northeast High School. Track Squad (I, II), Varsitv 
(III, IV); "S" Club. 






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ROBERT BAIRD CLOTHIER <S>K<ir 

777 Grand Ave., Rochester, N. Y. Engineering Honors 

"Shoived him the ^entUman and scholar." 
Rochester High School, fhanix Staff (I, II, III), Business 
Manager (IV); Business Manager, Portjolto (III); Y.M.C.A 
Secretary-Treasurer (III), President (IV); Secretary A.A. 
(IV); Class Treasurer (IV-1); Pi Delta Epsilon; Kwink; 
Sigma Tau. 



CATHERINE BONNER COCKS 
Cornwall-on-Hudson, New York English 

"The world looks brighter from behind a smile." 
Cornwall-on-Hudson High School. Glee Club (I); Y.W. 
C.A. Employment Bureau (II, III). 



RUTH ELIZABETH CORNELL 
1806 Van Buren St., Wilmington, Del. 

"Who battled for the True, the Just." 

Wilmington High School. Class Hockey (I, II, III), 
Varsitv Squad (Ilf, IV); Class Basketball (IV); Class Gym 
Team (I, II); Class Track (III); Treasurer, Somerville (II); 
Athletic Association Council (III); May Day (III); Y.W.C.A. 
Social Committee (III), Chairman (IV); Vice-President 
Trotter Biological Society (IV); Student Conduct Committee 
(IV-1). 



JOHN KEED DE GRCOT * K ^I' 
34 Pine St., Morristown, N. J. Economics 

"1 am happiest when I am idle." 
Morristown High School. Football Squad (I, II), Varsity 
(III IV); Varsity Lacrosse (II, III, IV); -S" Club; Glee 
Club (II); Interfraternity Council (III), President (IV); 
Class President (II-l); Kwink. 



TITUS JOHN EWIG 
Morton, Pa. Fi"= ^rts 

"Just step into my off.ce — / mean room." 
Swarthmore High School. Glee Club (III). 



EDMUND USINA FAIRBANKS 
313 Park Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. Engineerin 

"Day by day I climb the Hill." 
Chester High School. Sigma Xi. 





TlALCYO^ 




»!i.aee.>£--— 




MARJORIE FISH A r 

215 Rosemont Ave., Webster Groves, Mo. Philosophy 

"Who mixed wisdo?n with mirth." 

Webster Groves High School. Glee Club (I); Student 
Executive Committee (I); Freshman Advisorv Committee 
(II); Class Hockev (III, IV); Class BasketballGI, III, IV); 
Captain (II, III, IV); Varsitv Squad (I, III, IV); Y.W.C.A. 
Cabinet (III, IV); President I.C.S.A. (Ill, IV). 



HELEN FRANCES FLETCHER X Q 

344 E. Pcnn St., Bedford, Pa. History 

"For she's a jolly good fellow." 

Bedford High School. I.C.S.A. (I); Student Affairs Com- 
mittee (II-l). 



HENRY CRAWFORD FORD e S n 

Port Allegany, Pa. Political Science 

"He has a keen eye." 

Port Allegany High School. Football Squad (IV); Var- 
sitv Lacrosse (I, II, III, IV); "S" Club; Instrumental Club 
(III); Interfraternity Council (II, III, IV). 



ALBERT NICHOLSON GARRETT <!> A 9 

228 Garrett Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. French 

"The true essentials of a feast are only fun and feed. 

Swarthmore High School. Basketball Squad (II), Fresh- 
man Basketball; Cercle Frangais (Honorary Member); Foot- 
ball Squad (II). 






GEORGE KELSEY GILLETTE, Jr. 9 Z n 
South Hanson, Mass. Economics 

Flay not for gain hut sport. 

George Francis Hatch High School. Cross Country Squad 
(I); Swimming Squad (I, II, IV), Varsitv (III); Baseball 
Squad (I, II, III, IV). 



ERMA GOLDSMITH 

1 Olcutt Ave., Bernardsville, N. J. Social Science Honors 

"Honors come by diligence." 

Bernards High School. Mav Day (I, III); Class Hockev 
(III); Forum, Vice-President (IV). ' 




TlALCYON 






^ 




m 



S. WARREN HALL 
Dover, Delaware Economics 

"Another one of the Hall boys." 
Weslev Collegiate Institute. Secretary-treasurer of English- 
Speaking Union (IV); Delegate of English Speaking Union 
to England (II). 



WILLIAM SCOTT HALL Wharton Club 

450 N. State Street, Dover, Del. Economics 

"Young men should travel, if only to amuse themselves." 

Wesley Collegiate Institute. English Speaking Union 
Delegate to England, 1924. Secretary English Speaking 
Union, 1925-26. 



RUSSELL ROBERT HARRIS K 2 
663 Mt. Prospect Ave., Newark, N. J. Economics 

"O'er all he spread a rosy glow." 
Barringer High School. Football Squad (I); Soccer 
Manager (IV); Baseball Squad (II, III). 



REBECCA MARY HATHAWAY * M 
4 Cedar Parkway, Chevy Chase, Md. Education 

"The rude sea grew civil at her song." 

Sidwell Friends' School. Glee Club (I, II, III); Class 
Basketball (III); Class Hockey (II); Swimming Shield. 






CAROLYN HEARNE n B * 
322 Maple Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

"And mistress of herself tho China fall.' 
Swarthmore High School. 



English 



JESSIE REBECCA HOFFMAN 
Chadd's Ford, Pa. History 

"1 laugh at the world and the world laughs with me." 
West Chester High School. Classical Club (I); Glee Club 
(III); Class Hockey (IV). 




TiALCYO^ 





ELIZABETH DORIS HORMANN 
628 Edwards Ave., Pottsville, Pa. Classics Honors 

"Latin was no more dijftcile 
"Than to a blackbird V ivas to whistle." 

Pottsville High School. Classical Club (I, II, III, IV), 
Secretary (I), President (III). 



MARY JOSEPHINE HORNADAY n B * 
1601 Argonnc Place, N.W., Washington, D.C. 

Social Science Honors 

"Jest and youthful Jollity," 

Central High School. PhcenixStaSQ., II, III), News Editor 
Phmnix (IV); I.C.S.A. (II, III); Honor Committee (III-2, 
IV-1); Social Service Committee Y.W.C.A. (IV). 



RHODA ESTHER HOWARD A F 
12 Felton Ave., Ridlev Park, Pa. 



Education 



"The gods have given her rare gifts, and she hath treasured them."" 

Chester High School. Class Hockey (III); Secretary W.S. 
G.A. (II); President Somerville Forum (IV); Junior W.S. 
G.A. Delegate to Eaglesmere (II); Delegate to N.S.F.A. 
Convention at Ann Arbor, Mich. (IV); Dance Committee 
(III); May Queen Attendant (III); Glee Club (I); Hamburg 
Show (IV); Chairman Student Building Fund Committee 
(III). 




EDITH DIXON HULL 

2603 Lyndhurst Ave., Baltimore, Md. English Honors 

' 'I am the very model of an honoring Swarthmorean. 

Baltimore Friends School. Class Hockev (I); Editorial 
Staff of the Portfolio (II, III, IV), 1927 Halcyon Staff (III); 
Honor Committee (HI); Secretary, L.I.D. (IV). 





FRIEND DAVIS HUNTER O 2 n 
737 Washington St., Cape May, N. J. English 

"Little bodies have great souls." 

Tilton Seminary. Soccer Squad (II, III); Track Squad (I, 
II, III); Phaiii.x Staff (I, II, III), Associate Editor (IV); 
Junior Editor, 1927 Halcyon; College Publicity Board (I, II); 
Portfolio Staff (II); Glee Club (I), Soloist (II, III, IV); In- 
strumental Club (I, II, III); Omicron Omega; Pi Delta 
Epsilon. 



HAROLD RALPH HUTCHESON Wharton Club 
New York City, N. Y. English Honors 

' ' How fast has brother followed brother. 
Yale University. 




ADELAIDE ELEANOR ISRAEL 
Princeton and College Aves., Swanhmore, Pa. 

French Honors 

'^Though studymghere at college^ she thinks always Westward Ho " 

Germantown High School. Glee Club (II); Cercle Fran- 
gais, Secretary-Treasurer (IVOi Class Hockey (IV); Class 
Basketball (IV); Class Swimming (I, II, III), Varsity 
Swimming (IV). 



MARGARET STONE JAMESON K A O 
Girard College, Philadelphia, Pa. English Honors 

'^ If you would have her create, she ivill write verses, P^^}\ 
and sing; if you would have her be merry, she will outwit you' ' 

Holman School, Bradford Academy. Portfolio Staff (II 
III), Editor (IV); English Club (II,' III), President (IV) 
Junior Dance Committee; Hamburg Show (I, II, III, IV) 
Class Poet (IV); Mortar Board. 




\ , 



S,^ 



EDWARD COPE JENKINS <J> A G 

Kitchens Lane, Mt. Airy, Pa. Political Science 

''Never write what you dare not sign." 

Baltimore Friends' School. Soccer Squad (I, II); Track 
Squad (I, II, III); P/ra«i.v Staff (I, II, III), News Editor (IV); 
College Publicity Board (I, II, III), Chairman (IV); Business 
Manager, Portfolio (III); Pi Delta Epsilon. 



ALICE MOWRY JENKINSON * il 



504 Heck St., Asbury Park, N. J. 



Mathematics 



"Enthusiasm is the breath of genius." 

Asbury Park High School. Glee Club (I, II, III); Class 
Hockev'(I, II, III); Varsity Hockey Squad (IV); Varsity 
Basketball (I, II, III, IV); Captain (IV); Treasurer W.A.A. 
(Ill); President W.A.A. (IV); Delegate to A. A. Conference 
at Cornell (IV); Mortar Board. 




ALBERT SIDNEY JOHNSON, Jr. A T 
211 S. Chester Road, Swarthmore, Pa. Social Science Honors 
"To talk is the pleasure of life." 

Swarthmore High School. Soccer Squad (II, III, IV); 
Lacrosse Squad (I, II); Assistant Photographic Editor J527 
Halcyon; Debate (I, II, III, IV); Manager (III); Chest Com- 
mittee (III, IV); E.S.U. Representative to England (II); 
Interfraternity Council (II, III, IV); Vice-President (IV-2); 
Delta Sigma Rho. 

ROBERT EMERSON LAMB JOHNSON A T 
101 W. Mermaid Lane, Chestnut Hill, Pa. History 

"He who does more things than one. 
Always finds some time for fun. 

Chestnut Hill Academy. Soccer Squad (I, III); Varsity 
(IV); Basketball Squad (I, II, III); Tennis (II, III); Captain 
(IV); Track Squad (I, II, III, IV); Runner-up Fall Tennis 
Tournament, Singles and Doubles (III); Treasurer (II-l); 
Feature Editor im Halcyon; Chairman College Dance Com- 
mittee (IV); Hamburg Show (II, III, IV); Kwink. 





TlALCYO^ 





NOLAN LEVI KALTREIDER e :: n 

102 W. Broadway, Red Lion, Pa. Biology 

"A quiet, careful worker." 

Red Lion Higli School. President Trotter Biological 
Society (IV); Business Manager Freshman Handbook (II); 
Delegate to Eaglesmere and Silver Bay Conferences. 



GRACIA V. KENDALL 

English Honors 

dge is more than equivalent to force." 

Abington High School. Glee Club (I, II); Alternate 
Freshman Debating Team (I). 



Edgehill, Pa. 

"Kjwti', 



DOROTHEA AGATHA KERN 

929 N. 43rd St., Philadelphia, Pa. Mathematics Honors 

"The %rass stoops not, she treads on it so light." 

West Philadelphia High School. 1917 Halcyon Staff; Art 
Editor Portfolio (III, IV); Class Gvm Team (I); Mav Day 
(H; Polity Club (I, II); Forum (III); L.I.D. (II, IV); Sigma 
Xi. 




PAUL MILTON KISTLER <J> i; K 

307 Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Biology 

"One who knows duty." 

Wilkes-Barre High School. Little Theatre Club (II, III, 
IV); President (III); Glee Club (I, II, III, IV); Director and 
Leader of Band (IV); Photographic Editor 1927 Halcyon; 
Athletic Editor, Phanix; Campus Club (II, III); Trotter 
Biological Society (IV); Hamburg Show (II, III, IV); 
Omicron Omega. 





ROBERT WHITE LAFORE A T 

Box 977, Narberth, Pa. Electrical Engineering 

"Cautiously, onward through life 1 go." 

Montgomery School. Radio Club; President (III); En- 
gineers' Club President (IV); Sigma Tau. 



EDWARD FREDERIC LANG $ 2 K 

308 Harvard Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. Engineering 

' 'Great oaks from little acorns grow. 

Swarthmore High School. Football Squad (II), Varsity 
(III, IV); Lacrosse Varsity (I, II, III, IV); Acting Captain 
(IV); Glee Club (III);'S" Club, Secretary (III); Vice-Presi- 
dent (IV); Engineers' Club, Vice-President (IV); A.S.M.E., 
Secretary- (III), Vice-President (IV); President A. A., Class 
Treasurer (IV-2). 




^ALCYO^ 






ROBERT FETTER LEE K 2 

324 N. 13th St., Coshocton, Ohio Social Science Honors 

" Accomflishment leads to bigger things." 

George School. Soccer Squad (I, II, III, IV); Track Squad 
(I); Glee Club fl, II, III); Freshman-Sophomore Debate (I); 
Debate (I, II, III, IV); Winner A T Speaking Contest (IV), 
Kwink; Omicron Omega; Delta Sigma Rho. 



MARGARET JOSEPHINE LEWIS 
321 S. Potomac St., Hagerstown, Md. 

"0/if has it been my lot to mark 

A bright and witty, talking Spark." 

Washington County High School. Debate (I, II 
Glee Club (I, II, III); Classical Club. 



PARKER BURDETTE LEWIS K 2 
283 Raleigh St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

"Fleetjiess of foot claims the spoils." 

Buffalo Technical High School. Track (I, II, III, IV); 
Captain (III, IV); Middle Atlantic States Champion (II); 
Two-mile Champion (II); Class Vice-President (II-l), Presi- 
dent (II-2); Secretary M. S. G. A. (Ill), President (IV); 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (I, II, III, IV); Interfraternity Council 
(III, IV); --S" Club; Book and Key. 



JOHN BRADLEY LEYPOLDT * A 9 
21 Park Ave., Maplewood, N.J. 

"What is so rare as a subtle remarW 

South Orange High School. Assistant Cheer Leader (III); 
Manager Tennis (IV). 



THOMAS CULVER LIGHTFOOT G 2 n 
South Brownsville, Pa. Electrical Engineering 

"Sincerity reaps reward." 

Latrobe High School. Track Squad (I, II, III); Radio Club; 
Engineers' Club; Chairman of Swarthmore Branch, A. I. of 
E. E. 



ROBERT LESLIE LINDAHL * A O 

4738 N. Ashland Ave., Chicago, 111. Civil Engineering 

"No reporter can call me a fish!" 

Lake View High School. Football Squad (I, II, III, IV); 
Varsitv Swimming (I, II, III, IV); Manager (IV); Inter- 
fraternity Council (III, IV); Y.M.C.A. Council (II, III); 
Sigma Tau. 




?mALCYO^ 






JOHN HAINES LIPPINCOTT, Jr. * K * 

145 S. North Carolina Ave., Atlantic Citv, N. J. Economics 

' " A Jack of all trades. 

Atlantic City High School. Varsity Soccer (I, II, III); 
Captain (IV); Varsity Basketball (IV); Varsitv Baseball 
(II, III); Captain (IV); Class Treasurer (III-l); Class Presi- 
dent (III-2, IV-2); "S" Club; Assistant Business Manager, 
7927 Halcyon. 

RUTH LONGACRE HE* 

926 W. Marshal St., Norristown, Pa. Political Science 

'^Aye, Niadam, t'lvas 1 that mads them laugh!" 

Norristown High School, George School, Phani.x Staff 
(I, II, III), Assistant Editor (IV); Womens' Athletic Edi- 
tor, Halcyon: Varsity Hockev Squad (III, IV); Class Hockev 
(I, II, III, IV); Class Basketball (I, II, III, IV); Mav Day (H, 
III); Dance Committee (I); Freshman Advisorv Committee 
(II); Hamburg Show (III, IV). 



ELIZABETH SELBY McCABE K A 6 



English 



Selbyville, Del. 

We love her because she is wise and true^ 
and also because she can make us laugh." 
Selbyville High School. Table Committee (I, II, III), 
Chairman (IV); Glee Club (I), Student Conduct Committee 
(III-2); Freshman Advisory Committee (II); Somerville Day 
Committee (III), Chairman (IV); May Day (I); Class Gym 
Team (II); Executive Committee of W.S.G.A. (IV); Junior 
Dance Committee, Senior Dance Committee; Alternate Junior 
Month Delegate (III); Chairman of Honor Committee (IV); 
Treasurer of Women's Student Government Association (IV); 
Hamburg Show (IV). 

FRANCES DOROTHY McCAFFERTY * M 
530 Runnymede Rd., Drexel Hill, Pa. English 

Whatever is worth doing at all is worth doing well. 
West Philadelphia High School for Girls. Secretary of 
English Club (III); Student Conduct (III); Chairman of 
Student Conduct Committee (IV); Associate Editor im 
Halcyon; Secretary of Y.W.C.A. Cabinet (II); Undergraduate 
Representative to Y.W.C.A. Conference at Eaglesmere (III); 
Secretary Athletic Council (II); Representative to Welleslev 
(III); Manager of Basketball (IV); Class Hockey (I, II, III); 
Varsity Hockey (IV); May Day (I, II); Captain Varsity 
Swimming (IV); First Place Freshman Gvm Meet; Hamburg 
Show (II, III, IV); Winner, Old English '■S"; Mortar Board^ 

RUTH McCAULEY n B * 
494 Wayne Square, Beaver, Pa. History 

"In youth and beauty, wisdom is hut rare." 
Beaver High School. May Day (I, III); Glee Club (I, II). 



RICHARD HARDING McFEELY K S 
76 Bryn Mawr Ave., Lansdowne, Pa. Social Science Honors 
"Write me as one who loves his fellow men." 

West Philadelphia High School. Football Squad (I), 
Varsity (II, III, IV); Varsity Lacrosse (I, II, III); Captain 
(IV); Class President (I-l); President "S" Club (IV); Book 
and Key. 






I^ALCYON 






GEORGE WILSON McKEAG * 2 K 

401 Lccs Ave., Collingswood, N. J. Social Science Honors 

'■ 99 44-100% Pure.'' 

Collingswood High School. Track Squad (I, II, III, IV); 
Manager of Football (IV); Business Manager 1927 Halcyon; 
Class Vice-President (III-2); Varsity Debate (II, III), Men's 
Student Government Executive Committee (IV-1, 2); 
"S" Club; Class Prophet; Pi Delta Epsilon; Book and Key. 



REBECCA MARSH 
729 W. Main St., Mount Pleasant, Pa. Political Science 

"She kept the even tenor of her ways." 
Mount Pleasant High School. 



VIRGINIA ANN MELICK A r 

Strath Haven Inn, Swarthmore, Pa. English Honors 

"But the redheads? Oh, they are dependable." 

Marv Lvon School. Hockev Squad (I, II), Varsitv (III, 
IV); Class Basketball (II, \\\, IV); Mav Dav (III);' Little 
Theatre Club (III, IV); English Club (11,' III, IV), Secretary 
(III); Chairman, Student Affairs (III); 1917 Halcyon Staff 
(III); Glee Club (I, II, III), Treasurer (III); College Dance 
Committee (II); Somerville Committee (l); Hamburg Show 
(III, IV). 



ANNA REBECCA MELONEY n B * 
317 W. Barnard St., West Chester, Pa. 

"Joy rises in me like a summer s morn." 

West Chester High School. Glee Club (I, II); Photo- 
graphic Editor, 1917 Halcyon (III), Class Hockey (I, II), 
Honor Committee (II). 



MARY ELEANOR MEYER H B * 
Chatham Court, 49th and Locust Sts., Phila., Pa. 
What she undertook to do., she did. 

West Philadelphia High School for Girls. Glee Club (I, 
II, III); May Day (I, III); Classical Club (I, II), Secretary- 
Treasurer (li); Art Editor 1917 Halcyon; Class Hockey Team 
(III), Captain (IV), Trotter Biological Society (IV). 



AMELIA CATHERINE MILLER K A 9 
R.F.D. No. 2, Phoenixville, Pa. Biology 

"Her happiness and her sadness is a reflect ion 
of the light in her friends' eyes." 

Oldfields School. Honor Committee of Student Govern- 
ment (IV); Publicity Committee of Y. W. C. A. (I, II), 
Cabinet Member of Y. W. C. A. (Ill, IV); Trotter Bio- 
logical Society; I. C. S. A. (I); Class Gym Team (I, II, III); 
Hamburg Show (I, II); Freshman Show; May Day (I, III). 




Page Fifty 




\ 




ELIZABETH MILLER K K r 
403 Pembrolce Road, Bala-Cvnwvd, Pa. German 

"Look out upon the stars. . . . 
And shame them with thine eyes." 

Lower Meiion High School. Little Theater Club (11, III, 
IV); Ponjolio Business Board (III, IV); Glee Club (I); Cir- 
culation Manager Fhani.x (IV); Student Conduct (IV-1); 
May Day (III); Property Manager, May Day (III). 



MINTER HOLMES NORTON 

1420 Washington Ave., Chester, Pa. Chemistry 

"You can't keep a good man down." 

Chester High School. Track Squad (I); Varsity (II, III, 
IV); Varsity Swimming (I, II, III, IV); Sigma Xi. 






REBECCA DARBY NOURSE 

Dawsonville, Md. Biology 

"The Nurse's tongue is privileged to talk." 

Fort Loudoun Seminary, Winchester, Va. Trotter Biolog- 
ical Society (IV). 



LILLIAN EDITH PACE n B * 
Falls Church, Virginia Political Science 

"It's the songye sing, and the smiles ye wear. 
That' s makin the sun shine everywhere." 

Western High School. I. C. S. A. (II, III); Glee Club 
(II, III). 



MARION ELSA PALMENBERG K K r 

455 Knickerbocker Road, Tenafly, N. J. English 

"Bid me discourse, I will enchant thine ear." 

Englewood High School. Varsity Debate (I, II, III), 
Manager (IV); Y.W.C.A. Religious Committee (II), Treas- 
urer (III), Vice-President and Chairman Religious Committee 
(IV); Junior Month Delegate (III); W.S.G.A. Executive 
Board (1-2); Class Gvm Team (I, II); Secretary, Phcenix 
Advisory Board (IV)'; Polity Club (I, II, III); Executive 
Board, Swarthmore Forum (IV), Delta Sigma Rho. 



EDWIN LEWIS PALMER, Jr. 

Primos, Pa. Economics 

' 'Still water runs deep. 

Swarthmore High School. Track Squad (II, III, IV); 
Football Squad (III); Radio Club (II); Secretary-Treasurer 
(III-l). . 






Page Fijty-one 




SAMUEL COPELAND PALMER, Jr. A T 
712 Ogden Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. Social Science Honors 
"A chip off the old block." 

Swarthmore High School. Football Squad (I, II); Varsity 
(III, IV); Varsity Track (I); Varsity Lacrosse (II, III); "S" 
Club; Interfraternitv Council (III); Class President (III-l); 
Phainix Advisory Board (I, II, III), Chairman (IV); Publicity 
Board (IV); Book and Key. 



LOUISE MAXINE PARKHURST X il 
Main Road, Hammonton, N. J. Biology 

"A lady richly clad was she." 
Hammonton High School. Glee Club (I, II); Trotter 
Biological Society. 



JAMES ROLAND PENNOCK K S 

Chatham, Pa. ,, Social Sciences 

"Keen mind — i/iod heart." 

George School. Varsity Debate (I); Soccer Squad (II); 
Assistant Business Manager Phoeni.x (II); Associate Editor 
1927 Halcyon; Ivy Orator; Kwink. 



French 



SARAH E. PERCY n B * 
Interlaken Inn, Lakeville, Conn. 

"Yes, Sal. — We certainly will credit your Bill!" 
George School. Varsity Hockey (II, III, IV), Captain 
(IV)- Class Basketball (II, III); Swarthmore Chest Fund 
Committee (III, IV), Chairman (iV); Vice-President W. S. 
G. A. (III). 



A^ 



V.- 



MARY MARCIA PERRY K K r 
104 Princeton Ave., Swarthmote, Pa. English 

"Heart whole and fancy free.' ' 
Swarthmore High School. Class Vice-President (II-2); 
Class Secretary (IV-1); Varsity Basketball Squad (I, II, III, 
IV); Class Basketball (IV); Class Hockey (I, II, IV); Assist- 
ant Editor, Phcenix (IV). 



WILLIAM CLENDENIN PICKETT, Jr. A T 

Springheld Road, Aldan, Pa. Economics 

"It." 

Upper Darby High School. Soccer Squad (II, III, IV); 
Lacrosse Squad (II, III); Cast of '■Dulcy," "Goose Hangs 
High"; Winner of Extemporaneous Speaking Contest (lU); 
Little Theatre Club. 



Page Fifty-two 




SARAH DARLINGTON PRATT K K r 

305 N. High St., West Chester, Pa. English 

"And is there care in Heaven?" 

West Chester High School. Phanix (I, 11, III), Associate 
Editor (IV); Glee Club (I, II, III, IV); Student Conduct Com- 
mittee (IV-2); May Day (III); Freshman Court (II); Class 
Gym Team (I); Delta Iota Delta. 



GERTRUDE MACRUM PRICE 

523 Woodbine Ave., Narberth, Pa. Social Science Honors 

"The hand that follows intellect can achieve." 

Oakmont, Pa. High School; Wells College. Polity Club 
(II, III); Forum (IV); Mortar Board. 





ELIZABETH KLINE PUGH K K r 
Golf House Road, Haverford, Pa. Education 

Hang sorrow! care will kill a cat. 
And therefore let' s be merry." 

Wright School. Varsity Hockey (I); Basketball — 2nd 
Team (I); Basketball— 3rd Team (IV); May Day (III), 



THOMAS KESSINGER RATHMELL 

1003 8th Ave., Moore, Pa. Biology 

Mtf njy are called but few get up." 

Ridlev Park High School. Glee Club (II, III, IV); Track 
Squad (l, II, III); Manager (IV); Campus Club (I, II, III); 
Trotter Biological Society (IV-2). 





KATHERINE REED A r 
College Park, Maryland Economics 

We wonder what are her thoughts, 
so seldom she gives them expression." 

Central High School, Washington, D. C. Class Secretary 
(III-l); Class Hockey (IV); Class Gym Team (I, II); Class 
Track Team (II); Freshman Advisory Committee (IV). 



SAMUEL ROBERT MEANS REYNOLDS * 2 K 

211 College Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. Biology 

"Satisfactory to the most discriminating taste." 

Swarthmore High School. Manager of Lacrosse (IV); 
Glee Club (I, II, III, IV); Instrumental Club (I, II, III, IV); 
Campus Club (II, III); Omricon Omega. 




3^\LCYO^ 




PIERCE LEON RICHARDS K 2 

17 Highland Ave., Lansdowne, Pa. Economics 

"The last of the Lansdoivne Supermen." 

Lansdowne High School. Varsity Football (I, II, III); 
Captain (IV); Basketball Squad (I)'; Varsity (II, III, IV); 
Varsity Baseball (I, II, III, IV); "S" Club; Track Squad 
(IV); Book and Key. 



CHARLES EDWIN RICKARDS * 2 K 

810 Prospect Ave., Moore, Pa. Mathematics Honors 

' ^ A mind ?iot much the worse for wear. 

Ridlev Park High School. Football Squad (I, II, III) 
Varsity (IV); Lacrosse Squad (I); Varsity (II, III, IV) 
Athletic Editor, IW Halcyon; Manager of ISasketball (IV) 
Class President (IV-1); Vice-President Athletic Association 
(IV); --S" Club; Kwink; Sigma Xi. 





GIRARD BLISS RUDDICK A T 

115 Simpson Road, Ardmore, Pa. Social Science Honors 

"M.akes work a pleasure." 

Lower Merion High School. Phanix Staff (I, II, III); 
Editor-in-Chief GV); Editor 1927 Halcyon; Editor Freshman 
Handbook (II); Portfolio Staff (III, IV); Pi Delta Epsilon; 
Book and Key. 



JOSEPH KEEN RULON n K A 
525 S. 42nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. Mechanical Engineering 
"Don t call me 'Wats'." 
West Philadelphia High School. 





WATSON BIRDSALL RULON, Jr. n K A 
525 S. 42nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. Mechanical Engineering 
"I'm not Joe." 
West Philadelphia High School. Football Squad (I). 



CATHERINE HERR RUSH 

R.F.D. No. 7, Lancaster, Pa. English Honors 

"Honor lies in honest toil." 

West Lampeter Vocational School. Glee Club (I); I. C. S. 
A. (II, III); Social Service Committee (IV), Student Conduct 
(IV). 





WILLIAM JOHN RUST K 2 

4504 Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. Economics 

"Thaf elusive charvi of personality." 

West Philadelphia High School. Varsity Tennis (I); 
Soccer Squad (I, II, III, IV); Glee Club (I); 1917 Halcyon Staff. 



ALBERTA EMILIE SAUTER A T 
4915 Parkside Ave., N. Wynneheld, Pa. History 

"Keep up your spirits; never say die'." 

Phila. High School for Girls. College Dance Committee 
(III, IV), Chairman (IV); May Day (I, III); Hamburg Show 
(I, II, III, IV). 



HELEN DUKES SCOTT A r 



Selbyvii: 



English 



the cap of youth." 
Y.W.C.A. Social Committee 



"A very riband ih 

Selbyville High School. --- 

(III); i.C.S.A. (Ill); Protest Committee (III, IV); Hamburg 
Show (III); Y.W.C.A. Religious Committee (IV); W.S.G.A 
Honor Committee (IV). 



AYRES CROMWELL SEAMAN 

363 Grand Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. Mechanical Engineering 

"The good Seaman is known in had weather." 

Brooklyn Friends' School. Lacrosse Squad (III, IV); 
Soccer Squad (III, IV); Engineers Club, President (IV-2); 
Track Squad (I, II); Sigma Tau; Sigma Xi. 






ROBERT WEIR SEDAM 2 X 
Wardman Park Annex, Washington, D. C. English 

' "Tis a sure sign work goes on merrily, 
when folks sing at it. ' ' 

Central High School, Washington, D. C. George Wash- 
ington Uniyersity. Baseball Squad (IV); Glee Club (III); 
Class Motto Committee. 



JAMES HEFFNER SELLERS * A O 

420 Douglass St., Reading, Pa. Political Science 

"het men say whate'er they will 

Woman, woman rules them still. 

Swarthmore Preparatory School. Baseball Squad (I, II, 
IV); Freshman Basketball Team; Hamburg Show (IV). 




15alcyonA\ 




RUTH MARION SERVICE * M 
17 W. Underwood Street, Chevy Chase, Md. French 

"She more often listens than is heard, yet when she 
speaks, her words lead down bright avenues of thought. 

Central High School. 



JACK COMLY SHOEMAKER * 2 K 

212 N. 34th St., Philadelphia, Pa. Economics 

"Like a Greek God he stands." 

William Penn Charter School. Swimming Varsity (I, H, 
III), Squad (IV); Hamburg Show (IV); Junior Varsity Tennis 
(II); Chairman Sophomore Dance Committee; Runner-up 
Men's Fall Tennis Tournament (III). 





LEAH WOLFENDEN SHREINER K A B 

60 Cedar Boulevard, Mt. Lebanon, Pittsburg, Pa. English 

"There' s friendship lurking in her smile." 

South High School, Pittsburgh. 1911 Halcyon Staff (III); 
May Day (III); Glee Club (I, II). 



DAVID FRANKLIN SILVER K Z 
11 Chews Landing Road, Haddonheld, N. J. 

"No speech ever uttered or utterable is 
worth comparison with silence." 

Haddonfield High School. 



Chemistrv 





WALTER OSWALD SIMON 9 2 n 

7101 Upland St., Philadelphia, Pa. Chemistry Honors 

"His smiling eyes with truth were stored." 

Lacrosse Squad (I, II, III, IV); Football Squad (II, III); 
Sigma Xi. 



HORACE HARRISON SMITH K 'i' 

519 N. Galloway St., Xenia, Ohio Social Science Honors 

"A one way street to success." 

Xenia High School. Football Squad (I, II, III): Swimming 
(I); Swarthmore Forum, Secretary (III), President (IV); 
Phceni.x Staff (I, II), Little Theatre Club; Intercollegiate De- 
bate; Hamburg Show (IV). 




JmA^LCYO^ 



^, 



TIMOTHY EDWARD SMITH Wharton Club 
1223 New York Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 

Social Science Honors 

"Kiading Maketh A Full Man." 

Central High, Washington, D. C. Track Squad (II, III). 



KATHARINE JOSEPHINE SNYDER X « 

5339 Greene St., Germantown, Pa. Mathematics 

"Oh what a crowded world otu moment may contain." 

Cheltenham High School. Class Hockey (I, II, IV); Var- 
sity Hockey Squad (III, IV); Student Conduct Committee 
(III-2); Class Vice-President (IV-1); Assistant Business 
Manager, 1927 Halcyon (III); Social Committee, Y.W.C.A. 
(Ill); President Y.W.C.A. (IV); Delta Iota Delta; Mortar 
Board. 



CHARLES ANTHONY SPANGLER * A 6 

319 Lafayette St., Swarthmore, Pa. Biology 

"Lor let s be comfortable." 

Swarthmore High School. Lacrosse Squad (I, II); Soccer 
Squad (II, III). 



ROBERT MILLER STABLER * Z K 
3017 Cambridge Place, Washington, D.C. 



Biology 



"The play's the thing." 

McKinlev Manual Training School. Varsitv Swimming 
(I, II, III);' Squad (IV); E. I. C. Backstroke Champion (II); 
Varsitv Soccer (III), Squad (I, II, IV); Lacrosse Squad (I, II, 
III, IV); Glee Club (I, II, III), Hamburg Show (IV); Trotter 
Biological Society; Campus Club; Chairman Senior Play 
Committee. 



ANNE JEANNETTE STETZER X fl 



St. David's, Pa. 



Mathematics 



"All Nature wears one universal grin." 

Radnor High School. I.C.S.A. (I, II); May Day Com- 
mittee (II). 



JOSEPHINE CLAGETT STRITE 
22 E. North Street, Hagerstown, Md. 

"She smiled, and the shadows departed. ' 
Washington County High School. 



Latin- 



Page Pijiy-seien 





WALTER SPEER STUDDIFORD * 2 K 

5422 9th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. Biology 

"The best dancer on the Jersey coast." 

Central High School, Washington, D.C. Track Squad (I); 
Glee Club (I, II, III, IV); Social Affairs Committee M.S.G.A. 
(IV-1, 2); College Prom Committee (IV); Interfraternity 
Council (II, III, IV); Secretary (II); Dance Committee (I, 
II, III, IV); Hamburg Show (I, II, III, IV); Class Treasurer 
(II-l); Class Presenter; Omicrom Omega; Kwink. 



THEODORE K. S. SUCKOW Wharton Club 
669 E. 23rd St., Paterson, N. J. Economics 

"To a philosopher no circumstance, however trifling, is too minute." 
Stevens Preparatory School. 





HERBERT KNIGHT TAYLOR A T 
8211 Cedar Road, Elkins Park, Pa. Economics 

"He who is ashamed to eat is ashamed to live." 
Cheltenham High School. Soccer Squad (I, II, III); Radio 
Club. 




LAURENCE JOSIAH TEST 9 S n 

Moorestown, N.J. Electrical Engineering 

"Grin when he laughs that bearith all the sway." 

Moorestown Friends. Soccer Varsity (IV); Lacrosse 
Squad (I, II, III, IV); Engineers Club. 



JACK THOMPSON * 2 K 

1105 Kerlin Street, Chester, Pa. Political Science 

"Then boldly sate your itch. Be very radical, and very rich." 

Chester High School. Swimming Varsity (I, II, III), 
Captain (IV); Runner-up, Eastern Collegiate Diving Cham- 
pionship, 1925; Lacrosse Squad (III, IV); Glee Club (I); 
Hamburg Show (IV). 

LOIS THOMPSON n B * 

5316 Colorado Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. French 

" She juggles two bright balls — one Leadership, one Laughter." 

Central High School. Class Secretary (1-2); Class Vice- 
President (IV-2); Secretary W.S.G.A. (II-l); President W.S. 
G.A. (IV); French Club (III, IV); May Day (I, III); Glee 
Club (I, II. Ill); Student Leader Glee Club (III); Junior 
Delegate W.S.G.A. Conference (III); Social Committee Y.W. 
C A. (Ill); Freshman Advisory Committee (III); Swimming 
Team (I, II, III, IV); Class Hockey Team (I); Class Gym 
Team (II); Winner of Old English "S". 







ESTHER MARY THOMSON * M 
3123 Midvale Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. English 

"Be gom^ dull care! Thou and I shall never agree." 
Germantown Friends' School. 



STEPHEN BROMLEY TILY * K * 

113 Edgehill Road, Bala-Cynwyd, Pa. Economics 

"The fittest time for festal cheer. 

Lower Merion High School. Assistant Cheerleader (III), 
Cheerleader (IV); Soccer Squad (I, II, III, IV); Lacrosse 
Squad (I, II, III); Track Squad (IV); Glee Club (I, II, III, 
IV). 




^ALCYO^ 




LYDIA PARRY TURNER n B * 

731 Yale Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. Political Science 

"But I am constant as the northern star." 

Swarthmore High School. Feature Editor, Phanix; Feature 
Editor, 1927 Halcyon; Manager and Editor, W.S.G.A. Hand- 
book- Vice-President, Somerville (III). 



J. PAXTON UNGER *K* 

2219 N. Penn St., Indianapolis, Ind. English Honors 

"Diligence is the requirement for accomplishment." 

Arsenal Technical School. Football Squad (I, II, III); 
Varsitv (IV); Lacrosse Varsity (III, IV); Class Vice-President 
(1-2); kwink. 





VALESKA URDAHL 

5233 Locust St., Philadelphia, Pa. Mathematics Honors 

"The power of thought — the magic of the mind." 

West Philadelphia High School. Glee Club (I); Polity 
Club (I, II); Forum (III), L.I.D. (II, IV); Sigma Xi. 



T. GEORGE VAN HART K 2 

Haddonfield, N. J. Economics 

"But love's a malady without a cure." 

Lansdale High School. Varsity Tennis (II, IV); Glee 
Club (I, II); Instrumental Club (I, II); Freshman-Sophomore 
Debate (I); Little Theater Club; Kwink. 





ELIZABETH WEST VISKNISKKI K K r 

82 Park St., Montclair, N. J. English 

"Up rose the sun. 
Up rose Betty." 

Montclair High School. Glee Club (I); Y.W.C.A. Social 
Committee (II). 



F. HUBER WALTZ Wharton Club 
R.F.D. No. 1, West Chester, Pa. Mathematics 

"When a man's married his trouble begins." 
West Chester High School. 





Pa^i.e Sixty 




HALCYON 






r-a-v - 



ROBERT ALLEN WARD * K * 

417 Narberth Ave., Narberth, Pa. Economics 

"After all your activities really count." 

Peddie Institute. President Travelers; Promoter of Golf 
Team; Pocket Billiard Champion. 



LUCY GERTRUDE WHETZEL n B * 

Forest Home Drive, Ithaca, N. Y. English 

"She had a head to contrive ^ a tongue to persuade." 

Ithaca High School. Class Hockey (III, IV); Intercolleg- 
iate Debate (I, II, III, I\0; Y.W.C.A. Religious Committee 
(III); Glee Club (I); Hamburg Show (III, IV); Delta Sigma 
Rho. 



ANNA ROSE WILLIAMS K K r 
301 South Ave., Media, Pa. 

"She that was ever fair and never proud 

Had tongue at will., and yet was never loud. ' ' 

Friends' Central School. Junior Editor 1927 Halcyon; 
Freshman Advisory Committee (III), Chairman (IV); Class 
Vice-President (Il'l-l); Varsity Basketball Squad (I, II); 
Varsity Swimming Squad (IV); Class Hockey (II, III); 
Class Basketball (I, II, III, IV), Captain (I); Class Gym 
Meet (I); A. A. Council (II), Vice-President (III); Class 
Swimming (I, II, III). 



ELMER DELANEY WILT 9 : 
1C9 Rosemore Ave., Glenside, Phila., Pa. Engineering 

"Silence is one of the virtues of the wise." 
Abington High School. Engineers Club. 



ELIZABETH HELEN WINCHESTER K K r 
Valley Forge Road, Phoeni.wille, Pa. Education 

"A lovely lady, garmented in light 
From her own beauty." 

Freshman Debate (I); Class Secretary (III); May Day 
Attendant (III); Student Conduct Committee (III); Class 
Basketball (IV). 

NORMAN HENRY WINDE * A G 

Wauhesha, Wis. Civil Engineering 

"Us athletes don't have no time to fuss." 

Wauhesha High School. Football Squad (I), Varsity 
(II, III, IV); Basketball Squad (1), Varsity (II, III, IV) 
Men's Student Government Executive Committee (III, IV) 
"S" Club (II, III, IV); Class President Q-l); Class Vice. 
President (I-l); Engineers Club; Sigma Tau; Sigma Xi 
Kwink; Book and Key. 







MARGARET WIRTZ * M 



Kutztown, Pa, 



Biology 



"The qukt mind is richer than a crown." 

Kutztown High School. Varsity Basketball Squad (I, II, 
IV); Class Basketball Team (I, II); Class Hockey Team (IV); 
Glee Club (I, II, III); I.C.S.A. (I); Trotter Biological Society. 



MARGARET COTTON WITSIL 
29 E. Mo wry St., Chester, Pa. 

"Tis good to be merry and wise" 
Chester High School. 



History 





HELEN ELIZABETH WOODWARD 
142 Dean St., West Chester, Pa. English 

'Tis nice to be natural^ if you are naturally nice." 
West Chester High School. 



CHRISTINE MYERS YODER A r 
8411 106th St., Richmond Hill, L. I. 

"The less she spoke ^ the more she heard." 

Richmond Hill New York High School. Glee Club (I), 
I.C.S.A. (I); Corresponding Secretary Somerville Forum (II); 
Recording Secretary Somerville Forum (II); Social Com- 
mittee Y.W.C.A. (II); Fortjolio Business Staff (II); Honor 
Committee Student Government (III); Protest Committee 
Student Government (IV). 



HELEN EVELYN ZENDT X 
61 Penn Ave., Souderton, Pa. 

"Tho 1 am always in haste ^ I am never in 

Souderton High School. Class Secretary (I-l) Glee Club 
(I, II); W.S.G.A. Building Fund Committee (III-2); College 
Dance Committee (III-2); Little Theatre Club (II, III, IV); 
Treasurer (IV); Class Basketball (III, IV); Chairman Fresh- 
man Show Committee (I); May Day. 



JOHANNA GESINA ZUYDHOEK 

24 Washington Ave., Pleasantville, N. Y. 

Mathematics Honors 

' 'She hitched her wagon to a star. 

Pleasantville High School. Track Team (II); Class Base- 
ball (II); Class Hockey (III, IV); Class Basketbal" 
Sigma Xi. 




JUNIODS 



3mALCYO^ 




Junior Officers 

First Semester Second Semester 

John W. Dutton President Theodore Smithers 

Diane Follwell . Vice-President Charlotte S. Salmon 

Olive V. Deane Secretary Margaret Somerville 

Harold S. Berry Treasurer Charles E. Tilton 







'H 


i^ %J 


\ 


li^^jgjj - 






1 


m 


, ■■'•■^- • ■ 






K . '^ 


l^il 




Page Sixty-five 




SmALXTo^ 





BRADLEY CANFIELD ALGEO 
Oreland, Pa. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEER 

Brad is an extremely practical mechanical 
engineer. He believes in a practical appli- 
cation of every fundamental principle, as is 
quite evident when one enters his room at 
Wharton. On opening the door the lights 
are lit; an electric fan on the wall starts 
humming; and a radio announcer introduces 
the next concert company. 

As the electrician for the Little Theatre 
Club, Brad is well known. He is a diligent 
and faithful worker both in adjusting sockets 
and in manipulating the spot lights from the 
gallery. 

Although Brad was not with us last 
semester, he displayed engineering ability in 
holding down a responsible position with the 
G- E. Company. We are glad to have him 
back in our ranks, and wish him much suc- 
cess (especially when he is fixing our light- 




MARY KENDERDINE ANDREWS K K r 
620 Carpenter Lane, Mount Airy, Pa. 

ENGLISH 

"Here, there, and everywhere" — 

That's typical of Polly, 
There's no one quite so full of pep 

And no one quite so jolly. 

In case you have a fit of blues. 
Just drop around to see her; 

You'll find she makes life seem O. K. 
Who wouldn't like to be her? 

Besides these many faculties, 
She's pretty and she's clever. 

These traits have won a lasting place 
In all our hearts forever. 



3^ALCYO^fe 





CARL ALFRED ARENANDER 
587 Summer Ave., Newark, N. J. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

.Carl is one of the few Juniors who started 
out in engineering and is still going, and we 
seldom see him around the campus without 
the well known "slip stick" in his pocket. 

He will always be remembered for his 
ability and proficiency in making himself 
heard and felt during Freshman parties. The 
fact that Carl is a Junior is largely responsi- 
ble for the cockiness of this year's Freshmen. 

Carl comes from Newark, but most people 
think he comes from York — when in reality 
that is only his second home. It's she that 
lives in York. 



ARTHUR GORHAM BAKER A T 
1767 Lanier Place, Washington, D.C. 

BIOLOGY 

Everybody knows Art. He just naturally 
has his place, and it is a pretty big place at 
that. He's only six feet four, but manages 
to hold his own with the bigger fellows. 

Art is heading for a medical degree, and 
by the way he's working now, we ail expect 
to see him get it with flying colors. He 
spends most of his afternoons playing with 
Dr. Palmer's pet specimens. But after that 
he always finds time to go out and get some 
exercise, throwing the "plate" around. In- 
cidentally, he holds the Middle Atlantic 
States Record in the Discus Throw. 

Don't misunderstand Art when he says 
he approves of the Deane of Swafthmore 
College.* , - 




^ALCYOIN 





ELSIE BATTIN 
530 E. Johnson Street, Germantown, Pa. 

LATIN 

Elsie spent much time and energy Fresh- 
man year answering the question, "Are you 
Ike Battin's sister?" Considering that she 
has distinguished herself by keeping up the 
family tradition in getting all Alphas and 
Betas, she has firmly established her identity 
by now. Moreover, she can answer im- 
portant questions on Mr. Drew's "Reverse 
English Courses," and make any Latin veto 
mind its conjugation. We are, indeed, be- 
ginning to wonder whether the dead lan- 
guages aren't really alive when we see Elsie's 
classical club. But aside from studying the 
education and culture of the ancients, she is 
well versed on modern mankind and its man- 
nerisms, for she is making an exhaustive col- 
lection of the signs and symbols of a nearby 
university. If you pass by Elsie's room some 
day stop in and see her choice assortment of 
Princeton banners, pillows, and what have 




EDNA GERTRUDE BEACH A r 
421 E. Broad Street, Chester, Pa. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Eddie is one of these lucky girls with a 
suitable nickname. Doesn't "Eddie" suggest 
a happy, good-natuted, cheerful gay person 
to you? Well, if it doesn't now, it always 
will after you have known Eddie Beach. 

And talking of luck, some people have all 
of it. Eddie has riotously curly hair that is 
the object of admiration of all the men, and 
the object of envy of all the "unnaturally- 
curly" co-eds. Eddie is an exception to the 
saying that curly hair flourishes above a 
vacuum. Anyone who has any classes with 
her will swear to that. 



3^ALCYO>r 





ISABELLE MAY BENNETT <J> II 
131 Watchung Avenue, Montclair, N. J. 

ENGLISH 

While most of the rest of us are sitting 
quietly, we're just looking off into the dis- 
tance, but when Isabelle isn't talking she's 
thinking, and when we chatter and waste 
time, she's getting her work done. Isabelle 
hides her thoughts in an interesting way. She 
makes us wonder what goes on behind her 
big brown eyes. We can guess that there is 
enough, if marks are any indication. 

Someone once said that "A friend in need 
is a friend indeed." As with all other things, 
there are many degrees of friendship. But 
Isabelle's kind is deep and lasting — the kind 
that makes life worth while. 



HAROLD SILVER BERRY K 2 
Moylan, Pa. 

CHEMISTRY 

As the sun was struggling to rise over the 
town of Swarthmore, young Harold Berry 
trudged the Asphaltum on his ascent to Col- 
lege where he would astound gray-haired 
professors with a mighty show of knowledge. 
The crisp air radiated with his innocuous 
grin, as he contemplated those conquests 
near at hand. Then, early-rising co-eds, 
eager for a glimpse of the lad, would be 
seated at their windows. After classes, 
Wharton sessions sparkling with his wit, or 
more serious activities in the Phoenix and 
the A. A. office would claim his attention. 
What a vivid contrast the glow of this youth 
showed to the meager rising of the- 










i^ALCYOmi 





CAROLINE COOPER BIDDLE K A 9 
Laurel Avenue, Mount Vernon, New York 

HISTORY 

Caroline, of Laurel Brook, fully as de- 
lightful and happy-sounding a title as 
"Rebecca, of Sunnybrook Farm." And behind 
the name, a girl who can entertain happy 
house parties of friends, who can skate and 
swim and theatre with them, and smile all 
the while between; then go abroad and 
leave these friends for the summer, and still 
be happy at ease, camping with Austrian 
girls and boys by the mountains near 
Vienna. Even looking what we might call 
typically "Catolinean," with the golden- 
brown btaids, and picturesque blue bodice 
and skirt. 

Eagerly welcomed back to College for her 
juHior year, a busy Caroline is seen, for all 
tooYshort a time to talk to, since she reads 
f^r/h6nots now. We have been thinking, 
tHbugh, how glad we'd truly be, if Crum 
'^'reek were called Laurel Brook, art^ wguld 
leave with us its Caroline. 



ELLIS GRAHAM BISHOP * K * 
Swarthmore, Pa. 



ENGLISH HONORS 



Yes, little Freshman, that is El Bishop. 
He does look just like anybody else, doesn't 
he? Yes, even the greatest of men are lim- 
ited by resembling their contemporaries to a 
certain degree. You mustn't stare at him so 
hard, though. That is what all the girls do 
and you don't want to be called a sissy, do 
you now.-* Why does he look so cheerful? 
That is because he has so many nice things to 
think about. For instance, he has his foot- 
ball team, his lacrosse team, his Halcyon, 
his Portfolio, and oh, lots of other things. 
Of course, he'll be president of the United 
States. Don't be silly. 




&HALCYON 



VAN LEER ILL BOND K S 
State Road and Lansdowne Ave, Upper Darby, Pa. 

ECONOMICS 

Van returned to College in the autumn of 
1926 and settled down in D Section. But 
outside forces (force would be the correct 
term, the Campus Cut-up says) exerted their 
pull upon him. Consequently, he has ele- 
vated or degenerated into a day student. 
This state, extremely desirable in his case, 
gives us less glimpses of him than we had 
formerly. Yet he occasionally circles the in- 
door track; not to be ready when transporta- 
tion fails on cold mornings, as many think, 
but to keep in form for fall and spring sports. 
Such assiduity cannot help but reap its own 
reward. 



JOSEPHINE SCULL BORNET X O 
38 Aberdale Road, Bala, Pa. 

SPANISH 

Where is she going.' We don't quite know. 
Out to Penn, where the "Scull Stars" grow — 
To Lafayette she likes to go — 
Anywhere, anywhere, we don't know. 

Where is she going.' She sails right by 
In her brand new roadster, head held high. 
Where is she going? She's going to town, 
In her brand new roadster, to buy a new 
gown. 

Where is she going? We don't quite know. 
No one can ever keep track of Jo. 
Out to a tea, in to a show — 
Anywhere, anywhere^ weidont^ hn6y. 



<o^ 



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J ,L. 



Page Seventy-one 



I^ALCYON 





JANET LYLE BOWEN 
5232 Webster Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Janet Bowen? You know her — the quiet, 
reserved girl among strangers; the bright, 
witty pal among the old "Third East" gang. 
Don't see her often? No, you wouldn't, un- 
less you live down at the library or take the 
town train regularly. You see Janet has the 
original Honors Student-Day Student com- 
plex and you know what that means. Work 
all the time? Say, don't you know Janet at 
all? You ought to see her playing hockey 
or entertaining the gang up at the cottage or 
teaing at the "College Gate" or describing 
the latest show or laughing at some great 
somebody's great theory of something. If 
you don't know her, better drop in soon. 
Take our advice — it pays! 




GERTRUDE HAMILTON BOWERS XQ 
55 E. Greenwood Avenue, Lansdowne, Pa. 

BIOLOGY 

The flowers that bloom in the spring, tra la! 

Have nothing to do with the case. 
'Tis Gert Bowers of whom we would sing, 
tra la! 

She's the Joker, the Queen, and the Ace. 

She Charlestons, plays tennis, and swims, 
tra la! 
And talks a blue streak all the while. 
She's quite fond of jazz (and of hymns), 
tra la! 
And she has an adorable smile. 

Last summer to Europe she sailed, tra la! 

And was gone for a great many days. 
Little Theatre Club wept and it wailed, 
tra la! 

For Gert always managed its plays! 

She has dates, she plays bridge, she can 
dance, tra la! 

And in studies she always has starred. 
It doesn't take more than a glance, tra la! 

To make Swarthmore fellows fall hard. 



-hi 



f/HALCYON 





WILLIAM T. BRANEN * A B 
239 Logan Street, Lewistown, Pa. 



DOROTHY WAINWRIGHT BROWN n B * 
1555 Lincoln Avenue, Lakewood, Ohio 



... and when interviewed, Mr. Branen 
sat at his desk, in his usual business-hke 
manner, so that he reminded our corre- 
spondent of that famous Homeric passage, 
"... then did Aurora, spring from her 
iridescent couch, glowing with a glow that 
slowly crimson'd all, bathe the cold morning 
with rosy shadows." His color deepened as 
he reluctantly confessed an addiction to bot- 
tle pool and the other species of genus bil- 
iiardis; his superiority has caused some to 
award him the mythical title of all-Swarth- 
morean champion. Majoring in his favorite 
pastime. Bill is minoring in biology which 
he is making the basis of a medical course. 
His course ought to prove successful, for, as 
Dr. Thomas Browne did not say, "It takes 
a good eye to spot a microscopic rhizopod 
and a little reverse English in skirting an 
appendix has made many a major operation." 



Have you ever seen Dot in a certain crim- 
son dress and wondered why there weren't 
more people as lovely as she.' Many girls 
have fine clothes, but she is one of the few 
who knows how to look stunning in them. 
With daintiness, dignity, and quiet thought- 
fulness. Dot is our idea of refinement. As 
well as havmg good taste in clothes. Dot also 
has a real taste for books. She can study 
almost as hard as a grind, and reap praise- 
worthy marks. So she has the esteem of her 
professors as well as of her classmates. Truly, 
Dot seems to be one of those rare and valued 
persons whose minds are as charming as 
their personalities. , ^ / <^\/^J 







fmALCYOmj 





ALICE GERTRUDE BURLING X Q 
245 83rd Street, Brooklvn, N. Y. 



VINCENT GILPIN BUSH * K * 
Riverton, N. J. 



ENGLISH HONORS 



When we began to write something for 
the Halcyon about Alice we thought of all 
the different things we could say — that she 
was always dressed in perfect taste, that she 
lived in New York, that she had a Packard 
car, that she was an honors student, that she 
was always making a flying visit home. But 
after we had thought of all by turns we knew 
that they were only an outer shell of the real 
Alice. 

Alice reads every new book and sees every 
new play that appears. Added to that she 
has traveled the world over. As a conse- 
quence, she can talk intelligently and inter- 
estingly on any subject. Is it any wonder 
that Alice is as fascinating as she is? 

But there is still something that we haven't 
s4jd:::rthething that really counts. Alice has 
thkTrate quality — charm. 



ENGINEERING 



Of course, it all started Freshman year 
when Vin told the president of student gov- 
ernment that as far as he was concerned he 
could go to student govetnment meetings. 
Since then he has widened his scope, and 
now the whole college knows just where it 
rates, as far as he is concerned. He doesn't 
limit his caustic execrations to verbal effu- 
sions alone, however, and wields a fearsome 
lacrosse stick and soccer shoe to the dire mis- 
fortune of our more confident opponents. 
He also condescends to put in an occasional 
appearance at a college dance, and was once 
known to speak to someone when he passed 
him on the campus. It later turned out to 
be Prexy. The president always was lucky 
that way. Although 'Vin has been telling us 
where to go for the last three years as far 
as he is concerned, we'll be glad to make the 
journey because we know he'll be there, and 
then natutally, we'll all have a good time. 




ABNER LINCOLN CASTLE K 
Croton Road, Wayne, Pa. 

ECONOMICS 

The thing that Link does best, as our 
rival colleges know only too well, is play 
football. It is said that he showed great 
promise of developing into a star punter 
while still a very young child, when he loved 
to exercise his right foot on his Dad's shins. 

Link lost no time in starting his college 
gridiron career. As a Freshman, he starred 
for the scrubs. The next two seasons he 
held down a regular quarterback job, and did 
it so well that he was elected captain of 
Swarthmore's pigskin warriors for the com- 
ing season. His great work in the last 
Rutgers game will never be forgotten by 
those who witnessed the struggle. 

Castle's life off the football field is one of 
studious endeavor (see note 4, pa^e 76, 'Vol. 
2). 








JULIA VANDERVEER CHAPMAN A r 
731 Harvard Avenue, Swarthmore, Pa. 



EDNA MAY CHILD 
3126 Midvale Avenue, Germantown, Pa. 



Brown eyes glowing 
Poetry in their depths, 
Dark brown hair 
Against white cheeks, 
Soft voice reading 
Tales of her fancy, 
Quaint humor — 
Quiet dignity — 
Inlie! 



Edie May be a Junior 
With hair of raven hue 

Yet Edie May is attractive 
With eyes of sparkling blue. 

Edie May be a wonder 
In bridge, track and gym. 

Yet Edie May is a worker 
Showing a world of vim. 

Edie May be a Quaker 

With manner soft and mild, 
Yet Edie May is lively, 

She's Swarthmore's only Child. 




jmALCYO^ 





ELIZABETH ELIASON CLAYTON 
Middletown, DeL 

HISTORY 

Betty is the Business Manager of the 
Freshman Handbook. 

All last spring Betty went out and col- 
lected ads for us. 

We think it's about time to publish a few 
of Betty's Best. 

"Come to Middletown; a good place to 
live, right in the center of Delaware. Easy 
communication with Swarthmore. Ask Betty, 
she knows." 

"Secretary; experience in writing personal 
or business letters (guaranteed that she will 
carry on 'heavy' correspondence) ." 

"Tutor; a student of history, specializing 
in Early American. (All Freshmen desiring 
good averages should consult.)" 

"Worker for Y. W. Can do anything 
from selling hot dogs at the football games 
to decorating the gym for the Hallowe'en 
dance, or assisting at the Christmas Bazaar 
as a popular member of the younger set." 



LOUIS KETTERLINUS CLOTHIER * K * 
Wynne wood. Pa. 



MATHEMATICS HONORS 



Behold, the champeen knock-taker of 
Swarthmore College. We maintain that our 
hero can nonchalantly stand more physical 
inconvenience than any other man on the 
campus. For example, when Lou broke his 
arm last fall while cavorting on the local 
gridiron, the first thing he said was, "It's 

going to be d n monotonous to carry 

this thing around all the time." In short, 
he is what one might call "a brute for pun- 
ishment." 

Beside the aforementioned disastrous ten- 
dency to play the gridiron game, Lou can be 
seen almost any afternoon after football sea- 
son taking his customary four or five mile,-' 
constitutional, conditioning himself for rradL.- 
Without doubt it is this training which also 
enables him to hold his lively pace among 
the debutarites, 



,i^x 



X 



^^- 



<v^ 







^ALCYOTT 



I 



!•' 



JAMES HAMILTON COLKET. Jr. * K * 
44 Monroe Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Jim Colket and the King of England both 
came into this world as infants. Jim Colket 
and Bernard Shaw both grew from child- 
hood into youth. Jim Colket and Wood- 
row Wilson both matriculated at college. 
With all these advantages of birth, circum- 
stances and environment, is it any wonder 
that Jim is such a fine fellow.' 

We must say it's strange, but we stand 
by it; Jim likes five hundred better than 
bridge. And yet he manages to have a bet- 
ter time than any other boy that we know, 
either at Swarthmore or at Brooklyn. 



MYRA CONOVER 
203 Haddon Avenue, Collingswood, N. J. 

BIOLOGY 

What Myra likes: Mice — she wouldn't hurt 

one for the world. 
What Myra dislikes : People who won't have 

their pictures taken on time for Halcyon. 
What Myra says: "Surely, come in and see 

me, anytime." 
What Myra doesn't say: "No, you may not 

have one of my apples." 
Where Myra plays: In the Class Orchestra 

with a violin beneath her chin. 
Where Myra doesn't play: In Lab. 
What Myra is: The owner of one of the 

kindest hearts in the world. 



\/ 



11 



fTN 






\ 



Page Seventy-eight 



jmALCYO^ 





JOHN JAMES COUGHLIN 
1047 Dewey Place, Elizabeth, N. J. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE HONORS 

When Jack matriculated at Swarthmore, 
and took up his residence in "F" Section, he 
was a rough and ready man from "Noo 
Joisey. " In his Freshman year, he was al- 
ways one of the staunchest supporters, in the 
old "F" section arguments (very heated), of 
the merits of his native state against those of 
Pennsylvania. To show that his state de- 
velops athletes, he has become quite profi- 
cient at soccer, and this year won his letter. 

"Reds" always had a delicate knack of 
finding hidden food. There used to be two, 
and only two, ways to profit by eatables in 
those olden days of Freshman lore. Either 
food had to be eaten before "Reds" got 
wind of it, or our hero had to be fed until 
he could eat no more. But alas and alack, 
he is no longer a he-man from across the 
Delaware — he's an Honors student. 



OLIVE VIRGINIA DEANE X U 
100 Poplar Street, Ridley Park, Pa. 

FRENCH 

P-retty, slender, gentle, sweet — is Olive. 
E-yes of brown and dancing feet — has Olive. 
A-lways with a cheerful smile — our Olive. 
C-atchy ways and latest style — yes, Olive. 
H-earts are all at her command — on, Olive! 
PEACH of a girl, y'understand — that's 
Olive. 






MARGARET LOUISE DE LANEY * M 
601 W. Lockhart Street, Sayre, Pa. 

ENGLISH 

"Gee, I'm hungry! I'll starve if I don't 
get some candy or something pretty soon. 
Guess I'll run down to Peg's room." 

"Have you heard the latest tale about the 
Phi Delts? Come on down to Pegs room — 
she'll be sure to have it straight." 

"Oh, don't worry about that. Run down 
and ask Peg — she works in the Dean's office 
and she'll know." 

"Gee, I'm tired! I feel just like a nice 
cozy chat. Guess I'll go down and talk to 
Peg." 

— And so it goes. The sign on Peg's door 
says, "OPEN ALL HOURS." We believe 
in signs. Do you? 



"WALTER FREDERICK DENKHAUS 
Colwyn, Pa. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Walt is another one of our conscien- 
tious young engineers. Much of his time is 
spent in trying to convince certain of his pro- 
fessors of the workability of his new meth- 
ods of solving their construction problems. 
Recently, however, Walt put one over on 
us. We find that, much to our dismay, Sat- 
urday nights are commanding much of his 
attention. Two years have passed in the com- 
pletion of this radical change, but the effect 
seems to be as permanent as the Saturday 
nights. 

It is not generally known that Walt is 
a track star. You should see his feet fly from 
Wharton to the station just after the 5.10 
pulls in. A flash, coat tails flying in the 
wind, and he is gone. 




^^\LCYOTN 



FRANCES EYSTER DOWDY K K r 
5239 Chester Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 

EDUCATION 

'Could you tell me where I can find 

Frances?" 
Tran? Why sure, you might try the busi- 
ness staff at the Phoenix office." 
"Business, huh.' I thought she was pretty 

level-headed." 
'Yes, a serene, dignified girl; comes from 

that intellectually Dickensonian town 

of " 

'Oh! a Philadelphia girl, but not a Dickens' 

charactet." 
'No; too — well sensible and modern for the 

dear old authot." 
'What? isn't Frances here? Finished her 

work already." 
'Yes, she's either at some Student Conduct 

Meeting, or she may be out walking. 

You never can tell." 






JOHN WALTHAN DUTTON A T 
47 S. Brighton Avenue, Upper Darby, Pa. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE HONORS 

Like Damon and Pythias of old they are 
never apart. We refer, of course, to Jack and 
Art Baker. A write-up of the one which 
did not include the other would be just as 
bad as the college dining toom without 
bread after a victoiy over Haverford. Last 
year Jack proved he was a one man track 
team, when necessary, by winning the decid- 
ing event in the Middle Atlantics. Then, 
too, Jack is the speediest man on the foot- 
ball squad and a whiz at circling the ends, 
which explains why he is such a favorite with 
the football rooters. 



,«=^> 



^x 



■ X- - 



:J^^ 



■S£H3i=~u' 






P^ge Eighty-one 





EMMA PEASLEE ENGLE 
Clarksboro, N. J. 

LATIN 

Emma, Emma 

Peaslee Engle, 

A Latin prodigy, 

Took great 

Care of her average, 

Though it was nearly three. 

Emma, Emma 

Said to her average, 

"Average," she said, said she, 

"You may get down to two point five, 

But you should be up to three!" 



ANTHONY MEAD FAIRBANKS Wharton Club 
Swarthmore, Pa. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

"Good evening, folks. Station T-O-N-Y 
announcing. A great privilege is in store 
for you, tonight. Mr. Fairbanks, the engi- 
neer of the famous group of '28, will again 
speak to us on the all-importance and ad- 
visability of study. Mr. Fairbanks, as you 
all know, is most particular in praaising 
what he preaches, but statistics have shown 
that at times Mr. Fairbanks has actually spent 
some time on the books. 

"Mr. Fairbanks hails from the metropolis 
of Swarthmore, but in spite of all that is said, 
this doesn't seem to hindei one bit his suc- 
cess as a straightforward fellow. Mr. Fair- 
banks." 



\/ 




ibdJ 



^HALCYON 




Jk 





ESTHER CATHERINE FELTER A r 
4511 Groveland Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 



extremely successful 



when 



she IS 
because 
escape notice 
just can't 
S 



Student Affairs, 
whacking hockey balls, 
and establishing a rep- 
utation for herself 
by directing 
firedrills. 
You can't 
estimate all the 
astonishing things 
S does, or all the 

friends she has. She 
made the dearest Princess 
in One Act Play, she is 
especially fond of 
arguing with Mr. 
Hicks in English 
class, and she 
can take care of 



S. 
love our 
much we all 
can't express how 
by herself. We 



10 girls all a houseparty 
of no less than 



THEODORE HENRY FETTER * K * 
Princeton, N. J. 

ENGLISH HONORS 

Act I 

This write-up has to be by far the wittiest 

you've read, 
I'll have to make it clever or it wouldn't do 

for Ted. 

Act II 
You see that it's dramatic, for at acting he's 

no dub; 
He gained his reputation with the Little 

Theater Club. 

Act III 
And yet another thing is clear; it's poetry, 

you know, 
Ted's waxing literary on the greait Pur{- 

folio. 

His looks are quite 

fata date? 
From the co-eds Itt 

futujre mate. 




^v^- 






HALCYON 



«w*^ 



FRANCES ELIZABETH FOGG K K r 
Hancock's Bridge, N. J. 

HISTORY 

Did you ever hear of anybody whose name 
absolutely did not fit her? Well this is one 
of those cases. Fogg is no name for Fran, 
and if anybody doubts it just start to argue 
with aforementioned young lady on any sub- 
ject you may choose, and your doubts will 
quickly be dispelled. 

Fran hails from Hancock's Bridge, which 
she begins by apologizing for, and ends up 
by saying, "Fm so excited — Fm going home 
over the week-end." But we have come to 
the conclusion that if the town has a few 
more people like Fran in it, it must be a 
pretty good place after all. 



\/ 



fc 



'»^ 



3Dl 



PCZjU 



ALICE ELISABETH FOLLWELL K A B 
122 Maplewood Avenue, Maplewood, N. J. 



ENGLISH HONORS 



Diane, though born in the island of Britain 
off the coast of Europe, claims no kinship 
with Diana, the moon goddess, born in the 
Island of Delos. 

But Swarthmore's classics are not yet writ- . 
ten, and those who have a major interest in 
modern and ancient lore know that when 
the name Diane is translated it means the 
ideal of modesty, grace, and maidenly vigor, 
a being identified by long dark tresses 
equipped for all manner of work and sport. 
In winter, guardian of the frozen lake, grace- 
ful in form and free of movement, she skates 
with some swift companion. Or weary of 
the chase, she turns back to classic lore, to 
histories long, or songs and dancing — for 
the song and ukulele are dear to her. 

And literary scrolls bearing her name 
testify that like the "fair-crowned queen of 
the echoing chase," though blithe and gra- 
cious, she is by no means a frivolous person- 
age. Protectress of out conduct, mistress of 
temperance in all things, we sing to her 
name; 

"Bless us then with wished sight 
Goddess excellently bright." 



Page Eighty-jo 






THOMAS H. LATIMER FOSTER 6 S 11 
Beaver, Pa. 



ECONOMICS 



Probably, until you looked above, you 
were not aware of the fact that Tommy comes 
from Beaver, made famous by Beaver College 
and its number of dog licenses. Tom is not 
one to take mattets seriously, for he scoffs at 
his home town, lessons and Miss Bronk. As 
his ambition is to be a Senator, he has al- 
ready purchased his campaign hat. 

Intimate friends speak of him as being 
steady, sentimental and sleuth-like. To bal- 
ance these qualities there are such failings as 
slapping people on the back, and playing a 
radical game of bridge. Two or more years 
of college and Harvard Law School should 
overcome these lapses. 



MARTHA GIBBONS X <> 
4 Ardsley Road, Highland Park, Pa. 



Energetic, Efficient — 
That's the Martha of her! 
Good student, and enviable marks — 
That's the Gibbons of her! 
Yet she doesn't remind you of either the 
Martha in the Bible or Gibbon's famous 
Decline and Fall. Jolly, and friendly, bridg- 
ing, and dancing. That's the Martha Gib- 
bons of her! 







3^\LCYO^ 





GERTRUDE GILMORE A r 
Emienton, Pa. 



WILLIAM ANDREW GOWDY A T 
436 E. Walnut Lane, Germantown, Pa. 



Musicale 

by Miss Gertrude Gilmore 
'I'll be in Carolina in the Morning" 
(Encores freely given before Xmas holi- 
days) 
'How Many Times?" 

(Often sung as phone rings) 
"Where'd you get those Eyes?" 

(She'll never tell!) 
'Sweet'n Ptetty" 

(Illustrations by the singer) 
'Ting-a-ling, I hear the sound of the Bells" 
CWhat bells, Gertie? phone bells or just 
little Southern belles?) 




An investigator of co-education need only 
go to Bill Gowdy in order to secure com- 
plete information on the subject. Bill has 
been engaged in a systematic study of the 
momentous problem for several years. First, 
at West Chester Normal, he was a diligent 
observer until the overwhelming majority of 
women cramped his style. At Swarthmore, 
his progress has been amazing. Much valu- 
able iniformation has been gleaned from the 
fertile field offered here. Extremely pro- 
ficient in shaking the hoof. Bill has found 
this talent quite helpful in carrying on his 
search for more pertinent facts. And com- 
bined with this is a disarming geniality 
which successfully camouflages the man's 
real purpose. 



^ALCYO^ 




FLORENCE EDNA GRIFFITHS 
Millburn Avenue, Millburn, N. J. 








CHARLES FRAZER HADLEY, Jr. * S K 
210 W. Maple Avenue, Merchantville, N. J. 



Clever fingers, typing ever, 
Crackers selling, tiring never, 
Friendships making, not to sever, 
Education her endeavor. 
This a glimpse is — of our Eddie, 
Who with smile and kind word ready, 
Cheers us on to victory 
For our class's history. 



Whoopee! Whoopee!! Whoopee!!! No, 
ladies and gentleman, there has not been an- 
other Indian uprising. You are in no dan- 
ger of being murdered in your beds (that is 
by Indians). Chuck is merely calling to 
some friends. 

It is rumored that he is keeping his vocal 
organs limber for cheer leading during next 
football season by this frequently repeated 
exercise of the larynx. If Manager Hadley's 
soccer team wins the championship in 1927 
it will be because of his loyal Whoopees 
after each goal by the Garnet dribblers. 

A thousand years from now, when most of 
us will have been forgotten, the name /of 
Hadley still will be ferqembered as'=Bne_-<of 
the founders of the iiSwarthmpre Qdtiege 




mA^LCYONfl 





CHARLES LAWRENCE HAINES Wharton Club 
Linwood, Md. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

All hail! The Maryland Mountaineer. 
Of course, we know there aren't any moun- 
tains in Maryland, but that's the name Larry 
earned for himself in his Freshman year. He 
tried to keep his door locked, but the boys, 
disapproving of this, managed to jimmy the 
window, and more than once the moun- 
taineer found his bed in sections E, F or 
even D. 

Larry is one of the few survivors of those 
of his class who took up engineering, and 
why shouldn't he be? Descended from a 
family of famous engineers he seems to have 
inherited his share of the talent. The moun- 
taineer has one big weakness, and that is au- 
tomobiles. 'When he and his little playmate, 
the other Larry, get together, you may as 
well go some where else to study. 




PHYLLIS FEAREY HARPER n B * 
Swarihmore, Pa. 

MATHEMATICS 

If some one introduced you to Phil as you 
walked along Walnut Street you would casu- 
ally ask her from which Gown Shoppe, Mil- 
liner's or Furrier's she had just stepped. 

If some one introduced you to Phil in a 
classroom you would either begin to develop 
an intellectual infetiority complex or go talk 
to her after class. 

If some one introduced you to Phil at a 
college dance you would admire her dancing 
and a pleasant individual radiance about her. 

If some one introduced you to Phil at 
Swarthmore College you would join the 
chorus of voices saying, "I'm mighty glad 
to have the chance to meet you, Phil." 



TiALCYON 





GEORGE ANDREWS HAY * A 
Chester, Pa. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE HONORS 

George is well known around college for 
his serious countenance and his powerful 
voice. He is not at all hesitant about using 
this latter quality, and almost any time after 
seminar hours it (the voice) may be heard 
booming through the dorm. As you may 
have guessed by this time, "bulling" is a 
favorite occupation with this young gentle- 
man. As a glib and convincing orator he is 
the Dean's only rival. 

This big voice is also put to good use in 
the Glee Club, and Mr. Nocka is said to be 
looking for three or four Freshmen to fill his 
place after George receives his diploma. 

About the only other thing that may be 
said against this man, besides the fact that he 
originated in Chester, is his exceptional 
proficiency in Civil Service exams. He got 
94 in the last one, which gave him the offi- 
cial rank of Mail-carrier. 



ANNE RUTH HERRMAN A T 
3100 Woodland Avenue, Washington, D. C. 

HISTORY 

Brown hair smooth 
With the "latest in cuts" 
Blue eyes twinkling 
With the "latest in Life" 
Smart clothes swaying 
With the "latest in style" 
Dainty feet dancing 
With the "latest in steps" 
The "latest in Buds." 








Page Eighiy-tihie 




TlALCYO^ 



CHARLES GORDON HODGE K S 
321 S. 46th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

ECONOMICS 

So many men cannot wear a hat; that is, 
wear it correctly — and with the proper tilt 
and an air of fashionable sophistication. But 
"Mooney" Hodge wears all of his with a 
certain gusto that is the envy of every Col- 
lege man. It makes not a mite of difference 
what kind of head covering is used, for the 
humblest and least artistic creation will be 
a dream upon the rotund peak of "Mooney." 
He has wotn everything from the flaming 
dink to the latest "iron man," exclusively 
for town wear, not forgetting the favored 
grey fez, used extensively for library trips. 
All of these lend an unusual distinction that 
has heightened a blooming personality. 



V 



EMLYN MAGILL HODGE X fi 
502 Gardenia Avenue, Royal Oak, Mich. 

ENGLISH 

In Lynnie's scout hand-book we find some- 
thing about the ingredients of education for 
the young scouts. She teaches those in het 
patrol — by example. Her "service for others 
and fellowship" we note immediately. She 
has a large coterie of friends, and, versatile 
as she is, delights them all; foolish with the 
Freshmen, sensible with the Sophomores, 
joking with the Juniors, and serious with the 
Seniors. As for her "Skill and Handicraft," 
we see that in the way she "manages" the 
girls' basketball team. We can vouch for 
her "character and intelligence," for she is 
straight as a die, and can procure high grades 
with little apparent effort. "Lynnie" is one 
of the affable, smiling Parrishiennes who 
keeps Parrish in a good humor by being ever 
a good scout. 






^CiL 



-^ 



Page Ninety 



*^Tr " 



4K^ 



w 



/ 



MARY ELIZABETH HOPPER n B * 
67 W. Johnson Street, Germantown, Pa. 

ENGLISH 

Our friend Betty, or Hopper as she is 
commonly called, is a committee of one to 
uphold the social standing of Swarthmore in 
the great outside world. Her favorite in- 
door sport is that of arranging the forty-eight 
hours of her week-ends so as not, to slight a 
single party, tea, bridge or what-not that she 
is supposed to attend. Besides Betty's "Sas- 
siety" duties, however, she upholds the fam^ 
ily honor as a Student (ask her why sometime 
before exams), as an Athlete (being the 
champion long-distance runner to the Tele- 
phone on the hall), and as a Public Speaker 
(in explaining how she keeps her lovely 
wave) . While anyone should feel proud of 
such a string of accomplishments, we feel it 
our duty to add that the Halcyon has it on 
good authority (viz., Betty's roommate) that 
Hopper is the girl whose disposition is more 
like the far-famed California weather than 
is California weather itself. 



HERBERT SAGE HOSKING, Jr. 
534 S. 48th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE HONORS 

Herb is a fellow who has attached his 
destiny to a literary star, and it certainly has 
shone brightly on him. He handles prose 
with a deft pen and poetry with a ready 
eraser. Herb succeeded in carrying off the 
big end of the prize offered by The Port- 
jolio last year. He also gained a handsome 
reward for the best collection of books 
owned by a student, and, to show his real 
intellectual interest, he spent it for more 
books. He destroyed the general impression 
that he was a professor by appearing in the 
Hamburg Show. 



t 



--i^K 



A 






Tir^ 



Page Ninc-ty-one 



TiALCYOl^ 





LAWRENCE ALEXANDER HUNT Wharton Club 
56 Davis Avenue, White Plains, N. Y. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Here, ladies and gentlemen, you have a 
rare species of the Mechanicus Engineeri- 
phia. This rare genus is very short-lived, 
seldom existing for mote than a semester or 
two. This one, however, has survived the 
especial hardships of this locality due to his 
peculiarly adapted supraaesophagal peri- 
cranium. 

Upon entering Larry's room, you might 
think you were back stage in a large theatre. 
No, not because of the pictures on the walls, 
for Larry isn't that kind of a boy, but because 
thete are so many ropes and pulleys that it 
looks like some scenery changing apparatus. 
Those who toom near him complain that 
they are unceremoniously awakened at seven 
forty-five when Larry's alarm-clock goes off, 
his window^ closes with a bang, his blankets 
are pulled .off, and the radiator starts that 
bumping for which 'Wharton radiators are 








EVERETT U. IRISH 9 S n 
28 Cottage Avenue, South Orange, N. J. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Florida, Cuba, and even Camden boasted 
of hurricanes last year, so Swarthmore, not 
to be outdone, is advertising one of its own. 
Have you noticed it? — rushing from Collec- 
tion where it tickles the keys, whitling down 
to the Phoenix office where it rustles about 
among innumerable papers, whistling into 
the gym where it frantically chases basket- 
balls, and then over to 'Wharton where it 
blows incessantly atound the bottom floor of 
"D" section. Yes, it's Patsy; he of the many 
and varied sapient observations; he of the 
unbiased adoration of college women; he of 
the account book, wonderfully neat and 
earnestly kept. Some think Patsy can be 
compared to a bantam rooster; that is, in size, 
crowing ability and indomitable spiiit; but 
those that know him well, step right up and 
call him Speedy. 



Vage . Nincfj-ttro 








ALICE SPENCER JEMISON * M 
4654 Locust Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



ELISABETH ALICE JENKINS K A 6 
Gwynedd, Pa. 



Dark wavy hair — 

Eyes of deepest blue 

That, sparkle with humor 

Or comfort in sympathy. 

Pretty, white hands 

With slender fingers 

Meant to play sweet music 

In solos or in accompaniments, 

Or write of classical mysteries. 

A slender, trim figure 

With laces and frills 

Of softest voile or rustling silk. 

The spirit of all that is feminine 

Is our Alice. 




Well-a, you see, I think it will be all right. 
Don't bother, I'll do it; I can iind time — 
really it's all right, I understand perfectly. 
Telephone.' — tell him, just ten minutes, 
please! Oh, dear! I've just been up on the 
dome learning my part for one act play — 
Oh! yes indeed, it's quite inspiring and 
quiet there. Yes? Surely, I'd love to help 
you any time, just drop in my room any min- 
ute, I'm always there. What? — you were in 
three times yesterday and I wasn't there? 
Humph — oh, dear! that's funny. Oh! I re- 
member there was a hockey game and then 



Halcyon. 



tell him I'll be there in 







Page Ninety-three 




^ALCYON 





FRANCES FRENCH JOHNSON 
24 E. 6th Street, Emporium, Pa. 

BIOLOGY 

This, our transfer from Temple, is inter- 
ested in all things medical and embryological. 
Witness her tender ministrations to the young 
chickens (Nee chicklets) which Dr. Palmer 
thoughtfully provides. And in case you 
should be tempted to call her Frannie, just 
remember that she is 

F-ond of candy 

A-iming to please 

N-etting an aveiage 

N-othing but B's (and A's, but that 
doesn't rhyme) 

I-n college activities 

E-veryone sees 

that all these make FANNIE 
A girl that will please. 



GERTRUDE MARY JOLLS K K r 
4913 Cedar Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 




i.'^^. 






EDUCATION 



Where's Gert — what a question! 
She might be there, she might be here. 
Or just have gone to Eaglesmere. 
She might be out on a windy day 
Hitting the ball in a clever way. 
She might be dancing in the gym 
Or putting all the baskets in. 
Perhaps she's fussing in the hall. 
She's doing one of these, or all. 
Who's Gert — that's the question! 
She's the girl so full of fun. 
Who never fails to get things done. 
With blowing curls and laughing eyes. 
She couldn't hope to e'er disguise 
Her personality and poise; 
Admired alike by girls and boys. 




ALBERT DIETZ KELLER 
520 W. King Street, York, Pa. 



ECONOMICS 



This face is Al Keller's. He has three 
times been voted the neatest dressed man in 
Wharton, and his taste in cravattes is un- 
paralleled. When some bold brute insinu- 
ated that he didn't wear garters, Al broke out 
in a rash all over. 

It was Al who was obliged to pay for four 
admissions when he and Arenander brought 
girls to the Western Maryland game, and it 
was Al who borrowed an electric automobile 
to take a girl to a show. 

Kellei has eaten more early dinners and 
fewer breakfasts than Rus Harris and Al 
Cliff together. 

His devoutness, serenity, and poise have 
earned him the nickname of "Pope." He is 
the most supeibly impervious man in this 
here college, but we shall never forget the 
time he got caught in his underwear in the 
corridor. 



ANNE KENNEDY K A 
104 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE HONORS 

Sir Halcyon: 

Of those who join your ranks each year, 
from the Order of Juniors, are men and 
women of varying degrees of fame. Before 
your tablets are closed then, be it hereby 
known that the above named, Anne 
Kennedy, has risen from the rank of private 
life to a captaincy well-earned. Her nominal 
captaincy ranges from a squad of eleven girls 
on the hockey field to a supervision of the 
art work found upon your tablets. Academi- 
call)^ she leads in the ranks of those who 
march in Honors Students' files. 

If merely a captain's name wete ;'to be; 
published, we might-close h.er'e,T5tit we^iajg. 
found a young-girl-captain, strong in eaetgy 
and sympathy; a tactful captain, brilliant 
witty and wise. Not only, then, a captain's 
name do we proclaim, unless that mean a 
captain who can lead a host of friends to- 
gether, and win, botli for herself and them^- 
renowa.— J- " 





HALCYON 



RUTH EDITH KERN 
929 N. 43rd Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



MATHEMATICS 



A college man and a girl with a hat 

On opposite sides of a table sat. 

'Twas at the Harvard, and (what do you 
know) 

She spoke of riding horseback and of swim- 
ming just so. 

They mused and talked at a comfortable tate 
Til the hands of the clock had almost 
reached eight. 

And still the man and the maid did chat. 
(Now I wasn't there, I simply state 

What was told to me by a tearoom plate.) 

Involved they were, and I wondered how 
They discoursed so long without a row. 
The candles flickered but did not fade 
She mentioned mathematics and the engi- 
neering trade. 
They- were; loath to return at a very swift 

(But the cuckoo clock's hands were^b? 
^yyits face.- 

S6 each then rose and made a bov 
(Don't fancy I exaggerate, - 



J got my news from that Harvard plat^X 






ROY JAMES KERSEY K 2 
120 \V. 4th Street, Palmyra, N. J. 

BIOLOGY 

Running from 'Wharton to Parrish or to 
the Biology building. Running in to Philly 
on odd afternoons for "lab." Running 
around over the week-ends. Is it any won- 
der that Roy won a track letter last year, is 
it strange that he gets good marks in all his 
classes, or do we marvel at his popularity 
with the ladies.' 

Roy was awatded an open scholarship to 
Swarthmore for what he did in high school. 
For three years he has lived up to his repu- 
tation, and since some open scholars don't, 
we can promise him success in after-life. 



"<. 



Page Nhiely-s/x 



TiALCYO^ 





RUTH ANNA KERWIN 
West Chester, Pa. 



MARY FRANCES LANGFORD 
Croton-on-Hudson, New York 



There is a voung lady named Ruth 

A French Honor Student forsooth. 

She talked it so well 

That the "froggies" all fell 

And thought her a French girl in truth. 

Each day she comes out on the train 

And although of course she may feign, 

Her good disposition 

Disperses suspicion, 

The reason for liking hers plain. 



She studies all the history. 

Of Romans, Greeks and Crates; 

A book-worm? I should say not, 
She's a friend to all she meets. 

She's lovable and lots of fun; 

And if she is a sign 
Of what a classic student's like. 

The classics must be fine. 




fmAhCYm^ 





ORA KATHARINE LEWIS * JI 
848 N. 65th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

HISTORY 

Clothes, new and lots of 'em, did you 
say? Just see Ora Lewis, 4th east, for that's 
where the supply of latest Paris creations 
hangs out. But this isn't the most salient 
feature of Ora, for she's not at all the high 
hat sort o' person that this suggests; she's 
the friendliest of friends and has to shove 
'em out in droves from her room when she 
wants to study, for her room is the "salon " 
for all the gatherings and bull sessions on 
fourth. 

Blessed with a great curiosity on all sub- 
jeas, Ora has become a great delver into 
ancient lore and has joined that famous 
group of history majors of which Dr. 
Manning boasts. But history doesn't claim 
too much of her attention, for the tea-room, 
\heatreS; week-ends home and all the big 
^ Penn proms claim her also as an ardent 
] [enthusiast. Just the one to go to when a 
fi I "feller needs a friend" is Ora, for she's ai- 
rways sympathetic, and knows just how to 
/put us in a jovial mood. -"St^^i 



CAROLINE BIDDLE LIPPINCOTT K A 9 
Riverton, N. J. 

HISTORY 

There was a little girl, 
And she never had a curl. 
And she often thought it really wasn't fair. 

But she had a lovely smile. 
And she used it all the while 
So it never really mattered 'bout her hair. 

Now perhaps you can't conceive 
Of how Kitty could relieve 
A manager of hockey's busy chair; 

Or take Portfolio in hand, 
A business deal to land 
'With the Lippincott efficiency so rare. 

She can dance with lively step, 
Her whole nature's full of pep 
And we're one of many people who will say. 

In one way she is unique. 
Any hour, day, or week, 
She can always scare the Swarthmore Blues 
away. 




HALCYON 




^5 ^j85^ f**' 





RICHARD S. LIPPINCOTT * K * 
Riverton, N. J. 



ECONOMICS 



Writing Dick's life and accomplishments 
in a hundred words is like confining the 
Dean to two minutes — it just can't be done. 
Dick is a great golf player — his endurance 
and stamina are remarkable. He plays all 
nineteen holes equally well. From country 
club to ranch is no small step, but Dick is 
both the debutantes' rage and the cowboys' 
idol. 'With regard to riding broncoes he has 
such an edge on the market that he collects 
a royalty from every picture Tom Mix pro- 
duces. 

What Dick can't accomplish any other way 
he accomplishes with his smile. Everyone 
laughs with him here at college. So we will 
say for Dick, "If to be happy means I must 
be king — go fetch my crown." 



MARY MILLER LIVEZY 
Norristown, Pa. 

BIOLOGY 

"Pop Livezy," say all the Freshmen even 
if it isn't Pop Night, "She's so jolly and 
good-natured, you won't be a bit afraid of 
her." 

"Pop Livezy," said all the Sophomores, 
when she ran the Cracker room — and the 
crackers weren't the only attraction. 

"Pop Livezy," say the Juniors who are 
just starting riding lessons, "She knows all 
there is to know about horses and is just 
the kind of a person you like to ride with." 

"Pop Livezy," say all the Seniors, "if you 
want some fun — that twinkle in her eye 
isn't there for nothing!" 




^ALCYO^ 






MARGUERITE LUKENS 
Lansdowne Ave. and Cedar Lane, Upper Darby, Pa. 

BIOLOGY 

Another blond? Quire rrue 

Deep dark blue eyes too. 

And a "Dutch Boy" cut. Character? Listen — 

Blondes are fickle they say 

This one has never had a fickle day 

Yes, she is different. Marguerite's her 

name. 
Quiet listeners are hard to find 
Lukie is a friend of just that kind. 
Is she unselfish? Anyone who knows her 

will tell you. 
One of these athletes, too. 
She's a member of that famed 
Junior hockey team, acclaimed 

Champion! 
In basketball too she's always on hand. 
Spring finds her one of the band 
That runs atound the track. But 
After all, she ought to know 
How to make her muscles go 
ijcJi^nsileW an/ A number one Biology major 



ALEXANDER DUNCAN MacDOUGALL * S K 
Summit, N. J. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE HONORS 

Like Alexander of old who sighed for 
other worlds to conquer, our hero proved 
himself a versatile man by his success in 
various fields of endeavor at college. We 
might omit to say that he is manager of ten- 
nis, and that in debating his fame is great 
while as class treasurer he handled a diffi- 
cult job well. But there is one thing we 
must not leave out — he is feature editor of 
this famous volume. If you read with pleas- 
ure the pages of alleged funny stories and 
howl over pictures such as that of the foot- 
ball captain at the age of two and a half 
taking a bath, give the credit to Mac. 





HOLBROOK MANN MacNEILLE A T 
140 Mountain Avenue, Summit, N. J. 



MATHEMATICS 



Holbrook, better known as "Brookie," is 
a lad who hails from Summit, New Jersey. 
Brookie landed here in his Freshman year 
with a love of work and a shyness for the 
weaker-minded sex. Since then our fair hero 
has kept up to his reputation, and has not 
yet missed a football practice. 

Brookie has a generous heart, and for two 
years has handed out instruction in arithme- 
tic gratis to all comers, including Freshmen. 
Brookie is always accomplishing something 
worth while, and, if anyone ever filled the 
unforgiving moment, it is certainly the red- 
blooded custodian of A-1-4. 

His one failing is a weakness for a little 
bit of good clean fun at cards, and in this 
department Brookie is a tip-top player. 



WILLIAM CAMERON McCOOK A T 
24 Carpenter Lane, Mount Airy, Pa. 

ECONOMICS 

When Bill first came 

Into out midst, not so 

Long ago, he was 

Like the proverbial lamb. But 

In a short time many 

A change may occur. And now you 

Might call him a lion — certainly not a lamb. 

Curly hair. 

Manly build — 

Certainly he's a social light at 

College and as for baseball. 

On second base and in every other way he's 







J Fi !r''i \ 



"halcyon 



EDWARD CAREY McFEELY K S 
76 Br\-n Mawr Avenue, Lansdowne, Pa. 

ECONOMICS 

In the autumn of 1925 the boys jumped 
off the Ocean City express — maybe it was a 
boat or an airplane. Somebody said, 
"Where's Ed? Didn't he come?" But Ed 
had fooled them. He was already in col- 
lege and planning activities for the Freshman 
of '29. Then Ed tried to be harsh and he 
didn't really do so badly. 

Now the vigilant Sophomore has blos- 
somed into such a popular Junior that the 
meekest Freshman could not imagine him as 
a tormenter. In furrher official capacities 
he has advanced to Student Government 
where he is a big reason that the Swarth- 
more system is a success. 



GRACE ELLIS McHENRY K K r 
93 S. Lansdowne Avenue, Lansdowne, Pa. 

FRENCH 

"Where' d you get that lisp, 

"Where' d you get that lisp, 

"Where" d you get those dimples, Gracie, 

"Where'd you get those jokes so crazy? 

Such pep, such life, such sweet good cheer, 

"We'll have you here just one more year. 

Halcyon business staff, 

Cercle Francais too; 

"Where'd you get that 3 point average, 

In the gay life of our college? 

Please make us happy and tell us this — 

Where'd you get that cute little lisp? 



aM. 



"my--^ 



iT 



Piige One HiniiI)L'd and Two 



HALCYO^ 





--*-" 




MARGARET EMMA MACKEY * M 
3524 13th Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 



CHARLES THOBURN MAXWELL * K * 
46th and Millersvilie Road, Indianapolis, Ind. 



ECONOMICS 



ONE-ACT PLAY 

Ambitious Sophomore Trying Out For 
Halcyon (sticking head in at door of room 
on 4th East) : Psst! Is Mackey around? 

Chorus — No, she's down at the Libs. 

A. S. T. O. F. H. (sliding cautiously into 
the room) : What's her most distinguishing 
characteristic? 

Chorus — She's the funniest girl in Col- 
lege! 

First girl — Ever seen her play baseball? 

Soph (dubiously) — No, can't say I have. 

Chorus — "Well, you ought to! 

Second girl — Ever heard her play the 
piano? 

Soph — No, can't say I have. 

Chorus — "Well, you ought to! 

Third girl — Ever seen her dance, or make 
fudge, or shush the Hall, or, gosh! Here 
she comes! Put that bag of peanuts away 
quick. (confidentially) She's counting 
calories again, you know. 

(Enter the heroine of the play) 

Mackey — I knew I smelled peanuts! And 
you needn't look at me like that, Isabelle 
Bennet, I can eat as many as I want, I 
cut lunch today! 

(Exit the peanuts) 
Curtain 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



And my DEAR, I think he's simply the 
most RA'Vishing thing. Of course, E'Very- 
body's CRAZY about him. I mean they 
PRACtically ALL call him the college 
FAVorite and E'Verything, and HONestly 
he has the DUCKiest way of RUNning and 
you wouldn't THINK he'd ever WIN like 
he DOES because he's sort of BULGY— that 
is not FAT, but YOU know what I MEAN, 
and HAVE you ever noticed the way he sort 
of SMILES at you as if YOU were the 
ONLY person in the WORLD, that is 
ACTually HAVE you? And then, of 
COURSE, he plays football and DANCES, 
and SOMETIMES you can absoLUTELY tell 
the dilTerence I mean-yc^u ACTt;aily-eantg 




^alcyon' 





G. STANSBURY MILLER A T 
429 W. Price Street, Germantown, Pa. 



JAMES RUSSELL MILLER * S K 
403 Pembroke Road, Cvnwvd, Pa. 



ECONOMICS 



If you're looking for "Studie," you won't 
have any trouble finding him. He certainly 
takes up his share of the campus. But every- 
body is entitled to his share and he manages 
his portion in a capable manner. In spite 
of his corpulence, he gets around well 
enough to hold down a regular position on 
the soccer team. 

"Studie" has another great achievement. 
Any time between noon and three o'clock, 
any day of the week, any week of the year 
you can find him in bed. And when he gets 
that big blonde head of his buried in a pil- 
low there's no disturbing him. So if you 
can't find "Studie," use this as a sure clue to 
his whereabouts. 



ECONOMICS 



Exhibit M is the "Big Boy" who is pugi- 
listically inclined. If some innocent Fresh- 
man is talking quietly to a friend, and some- 
one comes up unexpectedly and tosses him 
half-way down the hall, the victim knows at 
once that his tormenter is Jim Miller. 
That's the lad. Nature has endowed him 
with so much energy that even such enervat- 
ing tasks as a cheer leader's duties and a 
"base" (the other kind, too) in the Glee 
Club, cannot hold him down. Then, Jim 
works out some more by hauling scenery 
from the Little Theater to Collection and 
back again. But still he is ready for all 
comers and has yet to meet his match. 




TIALCYON 





ELIZABETH BENDER MOFFITT X Q 
6941 Hegerman Street, Tacony, Pa. 

ENGLISH 

Little Miss Moffitt 

Said, "Gee, it is tough! it 

Seems to me that I wotk night and day. 
Fof if Phoenix it's not, 
Then it's Honots I've got. 

And my marcel is turning quite gray!" 

But little Miss Moffitt 
Thought not a thing of it. 

She went west and was there very gay. 
She wears beautiful clothes 
To tea rooms she goes 

For I've spied 'er there many a day. 



THOMAS MOORE A T 
1128 Fillmore Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

ECONOMICS 

Let's give a cheer for Tommy Moore. 
His likes we've never seen before. 
A little chap but ne'ertheless 
At college he's a big success. 

He captains Swarthmore's soccer team; 
And represents the co-ed's dream. 
Upon his tenor voice so high 
The Glee Club also does rely. 

He in dramatics does his bit; 
His wise cracks always make a hit. 
An all-round man in Tom we find, 
A scholar, but he's not a grind. 







.^^a 



TiALCYO^ 





L. DONALD MOVER 
101 Richmond Street, Fleetwood, Pa. 

ENGLISH 

From up with the "flying Dutchmen," 
where pretzels are wont to grow, came 
L. Donald Moyer to grace the aged and ivied 
towers of Swarthmore. But his days were 
not long for the land of "Oxford in Amer- 
ica," as at the end of his Freshman year the 
domain of Hosenpfeffer called for its own. 

But back again for the 1926 session, 
Moyer can now and then be seen nurtuiing 
and rearing three Freshmen in the paths of 
righteousness over in Woolman House. 
From all reports he seems to be succeeding. 
Don is at his best, however, in the dining 
room. How he can eatl Ask any student 
waiterl 



JAMES NICHOL MUIR * 2 K 
132 E. Broad Street, Bethlehem, Pa. 




mk^m. 



ECONOMICS 



Dear Joe, 

Just a line to let you know that Fm still 
at Swarthmore. Might)' fine place here, 
m'lad. Lots of study and much diversion. 
Yes, we divert quite often. Co-eds here are 
of quite high qualit)', although other affairs 
keep me from giving them the attention I 
should. In odd moments the Pic business 
flourishes, and believe it or not, Joe, I 
haven't once used that gag about the lady 
who hung my picture in the room to keep 
the mice away. High-caliber athletics here. 
Been playing some soccer and basketball, and 
will probably sign again with the Travellers 
for the spring season. Just got a hot record 
in Chester. Have to take it down and 
play it. 

Remember me to the family. 

Yours of the fez, 

Jim. 



CSSfl 




DOUGLASS WINNETT ORR A T 
2701 Sheridan Boulevard, Lincoln, Neb. 



ENGLISH HONORS 



Doug is one of our best advertisements 
for honors courses; he came all the way from 
Nebraska to take a fling at honors work. Not 
content with that, he writes letters back to 
Nebraska telling of the joys of Swarthmore 
life and he goes to student conferences to 
talk up honors work. To remind himself 
that he came from the West, Doug keeps, 
it is rumored, a buffalo's thigh bone on his 
desk for an ink-stand. This bone has been 
bleached white by the fierce rays of a blazing 
desert sun. Truly this young man came from 
the West, but now he has all the advantages 
of the Woolman environment, of which he 
is ptoud. 






j^ALCYON 





LUTE LEE OWREY 2 n 
Swarthmore, Pa. 

ECONOMICS 

Lute got off to a bad start in commencing 
his college career. His first love was the 
University of Pittsburgh, but after a year 
of picking cinders out of his eyes, he realized 
his error and enrolled at the little college 
back in the old home town. 

Being a day student, Lute usually spends 
no more time than necessary around • the 
campus, except in the spring afternoons, 
when this sandy-haired lad may be observed 
on Alumni Field, gobbling up hot grounders 
with great relish. 

As a little side line, Owrey acts as a self- 
appointed censor for all Chester shows and 
if dtje is in quest of an evening's entertain- 
rnen^ he need only tell Lute the type of 
production preferred, and he will be directed 
to the theatre which has the performance 
^desired. 



HENRY THOMAS PAISTE, Jr. A T 
6715 Emlen Street, Gerraantown, Pa. 





r<. 






ECONOMICS 



Possession of a nonchalance, envied even 
by the most austere, has proven no handi- 
cap to Henry Paiste. His friends claim his 
indifference is superb. "Sticky," by which 
he soon became known, made an appropriate 
designation, because, when you need him, 
he's there. 

When it comes down to significant things, 
"Sticky" can uphold his part in any bull 
session, is a past master at bridge, and plays 
on the golf team. Besides these invaluable 
assets he wears knickers with a professional 
touch that no one in college can even hope 
to approach. 'What more could one want? 



^^ZcYO^ 





JOSEPH EUGENE PAPPANO 
500 W. 3rd Street, Chester, Pa. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

"Where do you worka, Joe?" 
"At college, if you must know." 
"What do you worka, Joe?" 
"I throw, I throw, I throw." 
"What do you throwa, Joe?" 
"I throw, I throwa da bull." 
"And why do you throwa da bull?" 
"To get with the teachers some pull, some 
pull, 

"To get with the teachets some pull." 

Dear reader, please remember Joe is a 
Political Science Major, and that being able 
to talk about anything and everything when 
it comes to legal and social problems is 
highly commendable. Perhaps this little 
patody will serve as an inspiration in his 
future profession. 



MALCOLM BRUCE PETRIKIN * 2 K 
78 W. 8th Street, Chester, Pa. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE HONORS 

"Mac" is one of those rare combinations 
of the athlete and the scholar. He e.xcels in 
both lines of endeavor, and also finds time 
to manage the business end of the Halcyon, 
attend to certain engrossing social obliga- 
tions, and pursue his duties as a Bible sales- 
man. If you've never heard "Mac" give his 
line, you have missed a gem in the ait of 
salesmanship. He makes you feel that life 
is not worth living without possessing three 
or four of his best Bibles. After listening a 
shoft while to Petrikin one is convinced that 
he could easily sell a foot warmer to his 
Satanic Majesty. , 




^\LCYO^ 



m 



±di 



til ( 



Nsw- 



ANNE HILLBORN PHILIPS K A 9 
1803 Monroe Street, Wilmington, Del. 



JEANNETTE REGENA POORE * M 
5148 N. Sydenham Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



On Maye Daye came a smylynge quene, 
With servantes and leydyes grete to be 
seene. 
A lovelee attendaunt with his hadde she, 
That walked behynde with dygnatee. 
Clept Anne, she is talle and faite of face 
With longe golde lockes that falle with 
gieyce. 

And eek she pleyes on the hockeye squadde, 
To vottes of Executyve gives hit nodde 
Ful nete of dresse and habytes alle wayes. 
The Lords and Ladies are filled withe amaze 
Whan on this ilke Anne theye gaze. 



If you see a darling twinkle 
Always lurking in the eyes 

Of a modest little student 
Very bright and very wise — 
That's Dickey. 

If you see a nifty diesset 

Flitting up and down the hall 

Evet peppy; ever happy, 

Hoping so»ie day to be tall. 
That's Dickey. 

If you hear a merry giggle 
Rippling forth most any time 

None other like it in the world. 
Unique, unmatched, sublime, 
That's Dickey. 



Page One Hundred and Ten 






FRANCES PORTER 
319 S. Chester Road, Swarthniore, Pa. 



MARION BALDWIN PRATT K K T 
305 North High Street, West Chester, Pa. 



EDUCATION 



Nize Franke, ate opp all de pep. Sooch 
a sneppy goil! mitt oi oi vat cloz — nix on 
de boggain stoof like at Snellenburger's. 
Vent to Patee, sootch a vickation, sootch de 
haxpeerience vat she got! ! So de pickstuz 
she got off she mit de sailor frends — seemply 
gudjous. Da Pureau loooks like de hysteri- 
cal mausoleum. I didn't told you yot a heff 
from it. Sootch grate phonings vat she does 
mitt de tephelone, mitt sootch dollink dings 
vot she seys. Frankie duss social services 
woik mitt de slums in de wops — tiching 
doomb pipple. Nize Frankie — so smat — 
hhonoring in hedurcation. Sootch a goil! ! 



FRENCH HONORS 



It's only what I was telling you the other 
day about Pratty — remember.' We decided 
she would make one of the best managers 
of any sport or activity in College. Yes, 
because she can manage her own private 
sports and activities better than any of the 
rest of us. 

No, I don't know, either, where she first 
learned to get her work done so that when 
the rest of us were beginning, Pratty had 
hers finished. But she did, from early 
freshman year. No, and it wasn't because 
she didn't play on the hockey team, enjoy 
swimming and work on committees and 
Y. W.. She does. No, and it isn't because 
she slights her lessons; hardly, my =dear, 
when she tempts a three pointer to come out 
of its hole and then reads for Honors. 

Well,-yes, that's it, too. She has time to 
walk( when she feels in a walking mo^d, 
time '^Q_-rfead when she has^ 
time^t^'^^rpleasant as weH' 




I^ALCTO^ 





RUTH MARIAN PURVIS 
252 N. 13th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

FRENCH 

Do you like gypsies, Ruth, as much as the 
rest of us do? We've been thinking how 
deftly you can swim and handle a canoe. 
How instinctively your body moves to 
rhythm; how impulsive your rich alto voice 
seems to sing. How often have we seen you 
thrilled at an oriental costume or was it the 
sight of an oriental ring? Whose tongue 
is it that can flash back impersonations or 
quick repartee? Because of these we think 
a gypsy spirit hovers over you. 



FRANCES WALKER RAMSEY K K r 
Big Stone Gap, Va. 

BIOLOGY 

Shuah I'se dat lonesome — sistah — ah. can' 
sca'cely perambulate. Doan' yuh know — 
hon'y, mah Babe has gwine up yonder wid 
de white folks up no'th an' lef her ole 
Uncle Remus foh prettah nigh ontuh th'ee 
yeahs? Why — I'se jes' sta'vin ter defT ter 
heah mah li'l yellah-haired Baby come laffin 
along, caperin' an' dancin' an' jokin'. 
Lawdy! and kin that chile sing whal' she's 
workin'? 

'Pon mah soul I low when I mak' in- 
quiahments 'bout her Ah might jes' as well 
uh know'd she's most cleahed up de hole 
state of Pennsylvaniah. Her Mammy say 
she's raisin' money fer de school buildin'. 
Law — I spec she's sleepin' out nites herself 
habin' a gay ole time whil' she works. Ah 
shuah hopes she doan foahget dat de ole 
folks down home lub her de powahful same 
as de fellahs in de no'th. Ramsey dat's de 
las' name — yez suh, ob cose, honey she's 
mah "Baby" foaheber, de same as youahs. 




Ihalcyo^ 





EDNA MARIE RATTEY X 5! 
90 Morningsidc Drive, New York, N. Y. 



MATHEMATICS 



Miss Edna came to Swarthmore 

From little old New Yawk, 
You can tell it by her accent 
And her clever table talk. 
But please don't get excited, or you'll find 

yourself misled, 
For Edna came ro School with Mathematics 
in her head. 

She's travelled much abroad, you know; 

Is rather versatile; 
She's very fond of figures 

And dresses right in style. 
She likes all kinds of classes, but especially 

poetry 
And for a hobby, often walks to Media for 
tea. 



KATHARINE EDNA RITTENHOUSE n B $ 
6025 Jefferson Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

ENGLISH 

"Tell me, do you think — ?" and then 
Kitty asks your advice on some serious prob- 
lem; Somerville, or Phoenix or Pan-Hellenic 
or any of the numerous things with which 
she is always busied. And you find yourself 
looking at her, deep into her brown, brown 
eyes that flash as she talks, and at her dark, 
dark hair which falls so softly over her face, 
and such a perfect complexion, "Tell me, 
honestly what do you think — ?" Good 
Heavens where have you been? Why 
dreaming about Kitty! And then Kitty 
walks off and does the thing for which she 
wanted your advice just beautifully without 
any of your help at all. Kitty is like that — 
she always gets the jobs, which is good; and 
she always gets them done, which is better;' 
and she always does thetn w^ll, Whicti ^ 
best! _ ^jJ=^^_^5=^^j^ 





One Hundred and Thirteen 




t~ 



i^\LCYO^ 





MARY LOUISE ROBISON X Q 
17 E. Stratford Avenue, Lansdowne, Pa. 

FRENCH 

Everyone has heard the new song "Mary 
Lou". Everyone is singing it, and we all 
know for whom it was written. Our Mary 
Lou is just the girl to be the inspiration for 
a song. 

Mary Lou, Mary Lou 

Cross our hearts, we love you. 

A diminutive, clever, serene, little girl, 

Blue eyes a-laughing, you set our hearts 
awhirl, and just 

Fof you, Mary Lou, 

Won't you smile for us — please do! 

When you're looking 'round for knowl- 
edge 

Or for "Mac" out at college 
i^e all point to you, Mary Lou. 



NELL ANDERSON RUBINS * II 
606 Alabama Street, Bristol, Tenn. 

ENGLISH 

Nell has been — 

The leading lady in many a play. 
Nell might be — 

the heroine of many a novel according to 

experiences she has had with folks ftom 

the Tennessee mountains and points north 

or elsewhere. 

But we deal now with what 
Nell is— 

So list ye then to 

The southern rhythm in her voice. 

Sincerity and color in her actions, 

Variety and wit in her words 

Made delightful by a lyric beauty in her 
thoughts of life. 

And you will know that Nell has the fea- 
tures expression, voice and personal- 
ity of a modern poem; 

Essentially free and real. 




SmALCYO^ 




— 5 




ELISABETH WINIFRED RUMBLE 
Rudedge, Pa. 

ENGLISH 

"You can't judge a book by its title" — 
right! Take "Winnie" for instance — to look 
at those down-cast eyes and that sweet, shy 
smile, to watch that quiet, unassuming man- 
ner; to hear that low voice and those soft 
footsteps as she comes down the hall — you'd 
never think her name was Rumble! But 
then it's always the still water that runs 
deep. 



CHARLOTTE SUSAN SALMON A r 
Dysard Hill, Ashland, Ky. 

ENGLISH 

If you want a girl who's snappy. 

One who's always looking happy. 

Try Cherry! 

If you crave athletic glory 

We must tell you the same story, 

Try Cherry! 

If the Phoenix wants a worker. 

One who never is a shirker. 

Try Cherry! 

Or if a responsible person you need 

The Honor Committee will tell you with 

speed, 
Try Cherry! 
And last but not least if a room-mate worth 

while 
And a voice from th'e- saSthlancJ willfS^fve 

to beguile, ;/ j^ 

Try Cherry! 




^p^LCYO^ 





GERTRUDE BERLINER SANDERS 
1460 Columbia Road, Washington, D. C. 

BIOLOGY 

Not — Gertrude Ederle, conqueror of the 
Channel 

Not — Gertrude Atherton, the novehst 
Not — Gertrude Olmstead of movieland 
But — Gertrude Sanders, an all round 
Swarthmore girl. She hasn't swum the 
Channel yet, but she's getting good practice 
managing Swarthmore's swimming team. 
She hasn't written a novel, but you should 
see some of her biology write-ups. She isn't 
a star of the silver screen, but as an Honor 
Student or a hostess does she star.' We'll 
say she does! 








ED^WARD SELLERS 
Swarthmore, Pa. 

MATHEMATICS HONORS 

Ed is probably the smartest fellow in the 
Junior class, although he usually disclaims 
this role, and almost succeeds in making us 
think he doesn't do any work. After prov- 
ing he was the best engineer in his class, he 
changed to Mathematics Honors, which he 
enjoys hugely. 

He is the nucleus of any bridge game, and 
his mere countenance incites the boys to play 
their hardest. He certainly apoears the 
laziest and most shiftless member of his 
class. To see him shambling around, one 
would not think him the speedy swimmer 
he is. 

He is one of God's chosen few, who never 
seem to have a trouble or a care in the 
world. Always grinning, always ready for 
anything nonsensical, he certainly is the gay 
deceiver. For in his mind he threshes out 
the problems of the world. Perhaps his 
best trait is his insusceptibility to the co- 
eds, or even to good-looking women. 



jlmALCYO^ 




FLORENCE GARRETT SELLERS K K r 
227 McKinley Avenue, New Haven, Conn. 

ENGLISH 

I thought I saw a picture 
Of a maid of long ago, 

With (darkest eyes and tresses 
And her gown arranged just so. 

She looked so calm and quiet 
With poise and dignity, 

I wondered if, in my day 
Such a girl would ever be. 

I rubbed my eyes and marveled 
For lo! She was quite real 

They say her name is Flossie. 
Found at last — my quaint ideal. 




ESTHER SHALLCROSS K A B 
Middletown, Del. 

ENGLISH 

"And Esther obtained favour in the sight 
of all them that looked upon her," said the 
prophet aforetime. 

Thus shall it be recorded that another 
maiden, tall of stature and comely of face, 
arose from a nearby land and entered into 
certain gates of learning. And wheresoever 
the maiden sojourned she obtained favour, 
for she was kindly of action and waited with 
a cheerful countenance upon those in joy or 
in affliction. 

As aforetime she passed by with maidenly 
dignity, clothed in apparel of royal and 
softened hues. Moreover, she showed wis- 
dom in all her work and rejoiced exceedingly 
in the beauties of the land wherein she so- 
journed. 

Thus is it pleasing to the people, from 
henceforth, to cherish the name of Esther. 
For the virtues of Esther are queenly and 
she hath obtained favour in our sight.^^,,^- ,^ 




|mA.LCYO^ 




RUTH SHELLMAN K K r 
727 Elmwood Avenue, Wilmerte, HI. 

ENGLISH 

Swarthmore's "Shelley" has not the im- 
prudence or impraaicality of her namesake 
from Sussex, England. In faa, the first 
thing that impresses you about our Shelley 
is her unassertive efficiency. It is seldom 
that you find anyone so efficient and clever 
who does not continually tell you about it. 
But our Shelley lets actions do their own 
talking, while in those big blue eyes of 
hers and dusky hair we catch glimpses of 
the poet. 

And of course The English Club found 
that they needed a "Shelley" so they asked 
her to join. The Little Theatre Club liked 
the way Shelley manages things and they 
chose her as a member. Swarthmore College 
wanted this Shelley from Chicago so it ac- 
ce:pted her and since has been very glad. 






±A 







EDNA M. SHOEMAKER K A 6 
904 DeKalb Street, Norristown, Pa. 



ENGUSH HONORS 



Edna Shoemaker, Latest edition— Frice: 
Weight in gold. 

A sparkling comedy centering about the 
life of a 20th century honors student. 
What the critics say: 

The children — "We love the chapter 
where Edna tells the story about Maria and 
the stranger." (One of the high spots in 
this fascinating volume.) 

An old friend — "I recommend Edna 
Shoemaker because of the admirable splashes 
of social color and clever discussions of the 
best modern music, plays, and fiaion. Of 
unusual interest to all ages." 

Any boy — "I find Edna Shoemaker an in- 
teresting companion on any occasion. You 
never tire of her conversation at dances or 
elsewhere. She herself is an indefatigable 
character." 

All of us — "If you are not familiar with 
Edna Shoemaker, you have missed an ac- 
quaintance with one of our leading char- 



of th' 



e year. 



Hundred and Eighteen 






RUEY MAY SIEGER A T 
546 \V. Walnut Lane, Lancaster, Pa. 

ENGLISH 

One Point: Ruey's age, of which we are 
all jealous. She tries to disguise it under 
her height, but confidentially she is the 
youngest member of '28. 

Two Point: Ruey's activities, take your 
choice! Physical or Psychical? She balances 
her basketball ability with her debating 
prowess, and incidentally plays on both such 
teams in one day — if necessary. She may 
be aiming to be a "Financial Statistician" 
but in the meantime, she works on Halcyon 
and sits down with the class orchestra as 
our musician — or gains high tennis honors 
in the spring. 

Three Point; Ruey's average, another 
thing of which we are all jealous because 
we never see her plugging away or hesita- 
ting to go to Penn State when she has an 
exam Monday morning. And so, in addi- 
tion to a three point average which Ruey 
gained from the Faculty, the class of '28 be- 
queaths to her credit 3 additional A's, — 



ROBERT SILBER 
631 Langdon Street, Madison, Wise. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE HONORS 

This distinguished personage has recently 
honored our fair college with his presence. 
After spending the first two years of his col- 
legiate career at the University of Wisconsin, 
he realized our need for a genius, and 
promptly enrolled as a Swarthmore honors 
student. 'While his studies occupy the major 
portion of his time and interest, Bob man- 
ages to find time for a little dabbling in 
radio, stamp collecting, and swimming. 

But, sad to relate, even the best of us has 
his glaring faults and Bob is no exception. 
He has a weakness which, if not carefully 
guarded, may have serious results. I hesi- 
tate to mention so delicate a subject, but the 
truth must out, so if you'll come a little 
closer I'll whisper it to you. Sh-h-h. He 
plays a clarinet. Any Woolmanite will agree 
that this is a terrible shortcoming. How- 
ever, those who know Bob well can overlook 
his weakness for clarinet-playing, and we 
must admit, in the words of the immortal 
Shakespeare,:;^ 'He's a jolly good fell 




^ALCYOTN 





WILLIAM LINCOLN SIMMONS, Jr. * A 
121 Greenwood Avenue, Jenkintown, Pa. 



HENRY ALBERT SMITH 9 2 n 
Rutlcdge, Pa. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Gilda Grey and Bebe Daniels, as far as we 
know, never graced Swarthmore with their 
presence. But before they so heartily en- 
dorsed the Velvet Joe ads, they must have 
seen Bill Simmons, the most famous devotee 
of the briar in College. Maybe it was in 
Hollywood. Anyhow, while the fair stars 
endorse, Bill smokes. Wisps still hang in 
the Whittier Place trees where Bill once 
made his mark on the way from Woolman. 
That pipe's only rival is a decrepit "can" 
which appears now and then to make the air 
even denser. None other than Dean 
Walters, usually one to frown at all cars, is 
still grateful to Bill; all in loving remem- 
brance of the night a Ford snatched him 
from, the fury of the storm. 



FRENCH HONORS 



Ladies and gentlemen, you have before 
you this evening the one and only original 
bridge fiend. The "Governor" is posi- 
tively the only one of his kind in captivity. 
He walks, he talks, and he looks just like an 
ordinary human being, but listen folks; 
would you believe it, if I didn't tell you, the 
creature before you is not an ordinary person 
like you and me, but, by some quirk of na- 
ture, there are combined in him two most 
diverse oddities which make him one of the 
most interesting freaks in our show. Ladies 
and gentlemen, this man is not only a bridge 
expert but he is also one of those rare beings 
known as "honors students." Step right 
into the big tent, folks, and see this wonder 
of the world give an astonishing exhibition 
of bridge playing and preparing for to- 
morrow's seminar at one and the same time. 




^HALCYO^ 






ment! 




NEWLIN B. SMITH A T 
Swarthmote, Pa. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE HONORS 

"Y-0-0 there! What ho!" The corridor 
fairly rings with these deep-toned words. 
There is a shufBe of feet and a loud rattle 
of the door knob, as though a frenzied mob 
were eagerly seeking entrance. Suddenly 
the door of the Phoenix office swings wide, 
and in walks the cause of all the commotion. 
With his coat in one hand and a brief case 
in the other, he walks deliberately over to a 
typewriter standing on a corner table. Swing- 
ing his coat over the back of the chair, he 
leafs hurriedly through a great stack of 
papers in the brief case, and begins typing 
frantically. 

It is 9: 45 and Smitty must finish the 
account of his travels through Europe before 
ten o'clock. 



TiALCYO^ 





MARGARET SOMERVILLE n B * 
5600 16th Street, N.W., Washington, D. C. 

ENGLISH 

There's only one Maggie around this college 

Who's not a washlady, but out for knowl- 
edge. 

Yet we can all see how Mag won her name, 

She can work and be ladylike just the same. 

She works around college and makes every- 
thing go, 

Last fall she ran almost the whole Hamburg 
Show. 

Since coming to Swarthmore she's on student 
exec, 

We have to be good when we're with her, 
by heck! 

She's been an officer in our class, twenty- 
eight — 

She's in the Y. W., runs their charity fete. 

Once a week she teaches children, down in 
the slums 

How to sew with their fingers instead of 
their thumbs. 

She works well for Swarthmore wherever 

she goes, 
-And she gets all around because she's got 
r 



MARY THOMSON SULLIVAN K A 9 
8134 Cedar Road, Elkins Park, Pa. 

ENGLISH 

]h7imy, the Night Watchman says, Sully 
ought to be President of Women's Student 
Government. 

Visitors say, Mary Sullivan? Oh yes, the 
girl with the powder puff ears who took the 
President's part so well in the Hamburg 
Show last fall! 

Ellis says, Sully's right there when it 
comes to writing Featutes for the Halcyon. 

Prexy says, Mary doesn't eat enough 
breakfast. 

The Gang says, How' re you ever gonna 
get on half a page the facts about the most 
original manager of dances, birthday parties, 
teas, youth movements, Phoenix, House 
parties, Protest Committees, fun and devil- 
try that Swarthmore has yet seen? 

W^e say, Sully's write-up's only half done. 
For Further information see "Sully's" diary. 







GERTRUDE NAOMI TAYLOR 
West Chester, Pa. 



MARY HAYDEN TERRELLS 
343 N. Dartmouth Avenue, Swarthmore, Pa. 



MATHEMATICS 



Gertrude is one of the few who does the 
serious and the difficult. She is a math, 
major, a function involving the two angles 
of intellect and courage. 

When at leisure she enjoys riding her 
favorite horse over the meadows of West 
Chester. In the saddle Gertrude is as pro- 
ficient as elsewhere. 

She has numerous appointments in town 
of such an interesting nature that they oc- 
cupy much of her spare time. 

In all that she attempts, Gertrude is per- 
severing and hardworking, and the envied 
of indolent victrola players. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



"Yes, this room is a mess. As soon as 
I get these chairs painted and the floor var- 
nished and that cretonne bought I guess 
things will look better. You think pink 
cretonne would be better? Oh yes, but I 
like green. Oh who's got the blues now.' 
Come over here and I'll talk you out of 
them. — Do you feel more cheerful now.' 
Here I'll do that for you." — Mary enlive- 
ning the Day Student's Room. 

"Now arch a little more. That one you 
did last time wasn't so very bad — you just 
went a little flat. Get a little more spring. 
Go on — you can do it. Throw up your 
feet. That's better. Here grab this." — 
Mary teaching swimming. ~ - 

"I'm awfully sorry I can't stay and talk 
longer but I must be taking my daily hike 
down the asphaltum. If I can help you 
again just say the word." — Mary, the Day 
Student. V ^ii .>^ //V^!^>^- 




TlALGYOT^ 





ANN ENTWISLE THOMPSON K K r 
343 Freeport Road, New Kensington, Pa. 

ENGLISH 

For sale! One flaxen haired doll. Has 
brown eyes and rosy complexion. Eyes open 
and close as naturally as a real child's. 
When wound up this lovely doll will sing 
a first soptano. She can also do all the 
latest dance steps and answers to the name 
of Ann. Along with this remarkable doll 
we oflfer a complete wardrobe of clothes 
fashioned after the latest Paris models, 
chosen to bring out her golden hair and 
natural coloring. We guarantee that you 
will never tire of this unusual doll for the 
longer you have her the more attached to her 
you will become. If interested please call 
Parrish 2-W as we are sure that this excep- 
tional offer will be appreciated by many 



CHARLES EDWARD TILTON * A 9 
89 Greenacres Avenue, Scaisdale, N. Y. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE HONORS 

A literary gem from "College Daze," that 
great novel treating of the American Youth. 

Chapter VI. Page 6. — A Considerable 
Height 

"Charley Tilton was loath to close his 
book and go outside. It was so cool and 
pleasant in the library that May afternoon. 
But the fresh blood of Spring was in his 
veins. So, he tore himself away to go and 
frolic on the athletic field. The track coach 
was overjoyed at the sight of the youth, and 
called him. 'My boy, there is a place for you 
here. Just slip over to the pit and replace 
the bar when the pole-vaulter knocks it off.' 

Thus, Charley started, in this humble way, 
his illustrious college career." 




^ALCYO^ 



RAYMOND ALBERT TOWNLEY K : 
222 N. 9th Street, Newark, N. J. 



ECONOMICS 



Behold, the only logical successor to 
Rudolph Valentino. What feminine heart 
wouldn't flutter on beholding the classic 
features of Ray Townley on the screen. If 
the motion picture directors haven't discov- 
ered him yet someone had better tip them 
off to the biggest potential box office attrac- 
tion of the age, Raymond (rarely Himself) 
Townley. 

Meanwhile, Ray is limiting his sheiking 
to Newark and Swarthmore. Even here the 
girls are not insensible to his attractions and 
this specimen of masculine pulchritude is al- 
ways dated up for the girls' frat dances about 
a year in advance. On almost any evening 
of the week, at the end of fussing hour, 
Townley may be seen emerging from one of 
the Parrish classrooms with a fair co-ed at 
his side, peering down into her eyes with his 
famous "dying-duck" expression. 



HENRY LISTER TOWNSEND 
Wallingford, Pa. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Henry has been around college for the 
past three years, entertaining the Boys in 
some of 'Wharton's greatest Bull Sessions. 
In his smoke-filled room, he can get off some 
fine arguments, but we attribute a great deal 
of this to the influence of his pipe. He is 
never himself without it. 

■With a headful of red hair like Henry's, 
it is a man-sized job to keep under control, 
but usually "Reds" is pretty successful. Ac- 
cidents always happen — last year Henry took 
a crowd of fellows to town in his station 
wagon, and they let him out and came home 
without him. His red hair got the best of 
him then, and he never quite g^H.over it. 



J 



w. 



re 



Inn 



m 












Page One Hundred and Tifenly-fire 



//halcyon 






SELDEN Y. TRIMBLE, Jr. * A 9 
1210 S. Main Street, Hopkinsville, Ky. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE HONORS 

Si is the Democrat at Swarthmore; natu- 
rally he's a political science major. When 
he starts on free-love or whatever the Demo- 
crats profess to believe in, the test of us just 
give up the ghost. It has been said that if 
you saw "Seldom" and a stone in the middle 
of a big field, the only way you could tell 
the two apart would be to watch them for a 
long time. Perhaps, if you detected a slight 
movement on the part of one of them, you'd 
know that the other was Si. 

However, when it comes to Honors work 
and Hamburg Shows, Si rates a flat 2.75. 
Besides these minor diversions he is on the 
best of terms with Drs. Creighton and Mat- 
riot, not to mention the rest of the Absence 
Committee. 



^ 





-^dJ 



J0q3Q- 



ELIZABETH VAN BRAKLE A r 
3141 19th Street, N.W., Washington, D. C. 

FRENCH 

In Parrish, a Man! 
Coon coat and bowler hat 
Red cheeks 
Jolly looking 
Jaunty 

Eyes twinkle too roguishly 
Relief! 
It's only 'Van! 



^ALCYO^ 





PAUL MILLER VANWEGEN 
7018 Guilford Road, Upper Darby, Pa. 



ECONOMICS 



Impressions 
Paul, of Upper Darby. 
A day student. 
Understanding eyes. 
Ladies' man. 

Van Wegen, due at eight in the morning. 

At every college dance. 

Not far from George. 

Wishing for summer and the shop. 

Economics major. 

Going to the library. 

Excelling in lessons. 

Not in love — yet. 



ELIZABETH LIPPINCOTT VAUGHAN X fi 
201 Lippincort Ave., Riverton, N.J. 

MATHEMATICS 

Well, yesterday Mr. Eisman introduced 
me to another blond by the name of Betty. 
Mr. Eisman said she is just the kind of girl 
he wants me to be. I don't usually like these 
sweet things he wants me to be like, but 
she's all right — I mean she seems hke a good 
sort. She must have Rockefeller on the 
string, because her clothes make the ones 
Mr. Eisman gives me look like a South St. 
department store. 

This other blonde Betty and me are both 
girls that have fate in their lives I guess. 
She is on that wonderful hockey team at 
Swarthmore College. I am not athletic; I 
am dramatic, but I mean we are both 
talented. " .i^ 

We got along well. I'll get Mr. Eisnjkn 
to take me to Swarthmore Collegegometime; 
I mean, I'd like to see her again.y 




SmALCYO>r 





ELLA VIRGINIA WALKER 
1331 DeKalb Street, Norristown, Pa. 

ENGLISH HONORS 

Monday — Walker to seminar, lunchless and 

frenzied. 
Tuesday — Walker in Crum Woods, poetical 

and dreamy. 
Wednesday — Walker to Philosophy, breath- 
less and excited. 
Thursday — Walker to the village, for fun 

and food. 
Friday — Walker to the library, ambitious 

and studious. 
Saturday — Walker to the train, homeward 

and smiling. 
Sunday — Walker to meeting, thoughtful and 

earnest. 



MARIETTA WATSON K A 9 
Convent, N. J. 

ENGLISH HONORS 

Lives of great men all remind us, and 
Totsie reminds us of Edison, because she 
sleeps about five hours out of the twenty- 
four; of a bass drum, because she gets a 
lot of work done even if she does make a 
lot of noise; of Harold Lloyd, because she 
can keep us laughing and get away with it; 
of Coca Cola, because she is delicious and 
refreshing; of Camels, because 'most any- 
body would walk a mile to be with her; and 
of a once-popular song, because everything 
is Hotsy-Totsy now. 




Hhalcyon 





ROBERT KEYSER WHITTEN * A 6 
2604 W. 17th Street, Wilmington, Del. 



CHEMISTRY 



"Why is Bob Whitten in his room on the 
books instead of being out in the glorious 
autumn air?" asked the ignorant Freshman, 
as he respectfully doffed his cap. 

"That comes from knowing all about the 
division of labor, my boy," replied the Wise 
Guy, "and he didn't learn it by studying 
economics, for he's the Junior chemistry 
major. After a whole summer of thrills 
while making paints (not for co-eds) in 
Wilmington, Bob comes back and attends 
classes diligently, until he is inspired to cut. 
Then Doc Alleman just chuckles, for he has 
an extra hour to devote to his research 
work." 



THEODORE WIDING K 2 
1014 S. 51st Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

ECONOMICS 

Tanned, from the sunlit beach he comes. 

Education seeking here; 

Daring the rival's line before amazed alums. 

With fixed eye and plenteous speech 
In Wharton Hall he wends his way. 
Daring Freshmen wish to reach 
If they can, the goal he sets today. 
Now, all is still. The boys each 
Guess he's in the silo, hitting the hay. 




^alcyotFT 





ALBERT FRANCIS WIESSLER K : 
Lansdowne, Pa. 



ECONOMICS 



From our neighboring town of soft speech 
and a few beautiful women there came to us 
a young man in search of a different type of 
beauty than Lansdowne and U. of P. could 
jointly produce. We can't understand why 
he wasn't satisfied, but still we don't blame 
him, as no doubt he found what he wanted. 

Still Lansdowne must have something in 
its favor as every night Pete must go home, 
so he says, to see why father really needs the 
old homestead. However, some things man- 
age to get along even when Pete is not 
around and so he has taken time to show 
us that he has an apt hand for basket ball 
and — , well, basket ball really keeps the old 
legs in good trim, eh Pete? 

Time, it seems, can not wipe out all the 
lingering memories of Penn. And so at 
times out comes the old "blazer" and bear 
ijt we must until Pete's attack is over. 'We 
lijhcerely hope that these attacks will not 
?prove fatal to Pete. 



4/ 



Ail 




HELEN PRISCILLA WILLIAMS 

110 Moreland Avenue, Chestnut Hill, Pa. 

BIOLOGY 

"Well thee sees I haven't been back for 
a long time. Things have changed since I 
taught here, but I do believe the girls are 
just the same. They were dignified and 
quiet then but they knew when to be jolly 
and — what is it thee calls it? — peppy. They 
played good hockey and danced well, too. 
One of the things they were proud of was 
their sticking to a thing they believed in. 
I remember so well the gorgeous hair they 
piled softly above the fairest of skins, and 
the lovely clothes they wore. They were 
of fine old Quaker families and refinement 
and ladylikeness just shone from them. I 
wish I could show thee — why there — thee 
sees — they were just like that." 

I turned to look at Pris! 









MARGARET BOUGHTON WILLIAMS A r 
430 S. 42nd Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

EDUCATION 

Looking for ten people to handle a big job? 

Get Peg! 
Looking for a jack of all trades — from driv- 
ing hockey balls to handling accounts and 
giggling? 

Get Peg! 
Looking for a queen to take to that dance — 
someone who will dress well and really 
dance? 

Get Peg! 
Looking for a king to reign over a bridge 
tournament — to show the rest of the 
players how to play good bridge? 
Get Peg! 
Looking for an ace — some one who will 
be a real friend? 
Get Peg! 
Looking for Honors in any suit — Get Peg! 



ANNE ELIZABETH WILLIS * M 
North Wales, Pa. 

ENGLISH 

If you knew Anne, I'm sure your impres- 
sion, like ours, would be synonymous with 
the word "daintiness. " We can't quite pic- 
ture Anne behind a teacher's desk confront- 
ing little children from a nearby state, with 
the proverbial rod. But Anne did do that 
very thing, just last year. The way we can 
account for her success is that the children 
must have thought her rod a wand from the 
way she looked and spoke to them. But 
dainty people are always surprising us with 
their ability — that's one of the beauties of 
them. Anne is like that, too. Narrative 
Writing, Philosophy, and One Act Plays are 
only a few of the subjects into which she 
delves eagerly. Yet these and any of the 
other big and little things Anne does around 
college, cannot obscure a distinctly pleasant, 
a distinctly Anne daintiness — of dress and 
voice and manner. 








ESTHER HAMILTON WILSON 
Toughkenamon, Pa. 



n B* 



When Esther was a freshman, she flashed a 

merry streak. 
She had no time to study for she had eight 

dates a week. 
But she had a pair of eyes that made it easy 

as can be 
To vamp the mathematics prof, until she 

drew a B. 
Why when she needed any help, ten men 

jumped to the chance 
One kept her English note-book up, to take 

her to a dance. 
And when she asked if she would pass, 

here's what the profs would say, 
"If your attendance is kept up, I think per- 
haps you may." 
This Junior from Toughkenamon has 

friends and friends galore 
At work, in fun, in school, at home, she's 

made them by the score. 
Her eyes so bright, her teeth so white, her 

cheery disposition ^ ^ 

Are too well-known for us to try ^ Q^wt^'m 

composition — -'^tlS^i^'^: 

No wonder then as she goes byPime^Qiys*4, 

their hats will doff 
For the nicest thing about her is the smile 



that^-won't come off.-^ 



y^^^r" 11 



MARY WRIGHT 
52 E. Elm Street, Norristovvn, Pa. 

MATHEMATICS 



Mary 



Brains 

~r 

Honors Work 
in Math. 



Talent 



Energy 

Young Friend's 
Movement 



Artistic 



Dramatic 



r 



One Act Plavs 



Posters Halcyon 




lomore Officers 

First Semester 

Howard J. Wood President 

Catharine H. Emhardt Vice-President 

Elizabeth M. Ogden Secretary . . 

Thomas M. Brown Treasm-er 



Second Semester 
H. Thomas Hallowell, Jr. 
Elizabeth Clack 
Anne S. Lefever 
James B. Burr 




J^ALCYON 



Members of the Class of 192.9 

Christian Bert Adelman, a T, Mech. Engineering 3709 Military Road, Washington, D. C. 

Mary Kathryn Anders, French 1118 W. Airy St., Norristown, Pa. 

David John Anderson, History Morton, Pa. 

Herman Barton Anderson, fw^/M/:) 241 W. Union St., West Chester, Pa. 

Mary Anderson, a v. Mathematics 2013 N. 7th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Milton Job Atkinson, * S K, English 116 Buttonwood St., Mt. Holly, N. J. 

Barbara Y. Baker, n b *, English R. F. D. No. 3, Trenton, N. J. 

Howard Alison Baker, £««o?»?w 18 N. Rigby Ave., Lansdowne, Pa. 

Curtis Lyon Barnes, * K *, Economics 6680 Lincoln Drive, Mt. Airy, Pa. 

Ira Winslow Barnes, <t> K *, Economics 6680 Lincoln Drive, Mt. Airy, Pa. 

Donald Webster Baxter, * Z K, Political Science 1020 Parker St., Chester, Pa. 

Mercy Rebecca Bicknell, Mathematics Oxford, Pa. 

Albert Engles Blackburn, K 2, English .... 3813 Powelton Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Philip Conklin Blackburn, English 434 Central Park West, New York, N. Y. 

Rebecca Kirk Blackburn, K K r, English ....... 415 E. Penn Ave., Bedford, Pa. 

Julie Merrill Blaine, K K r, English 209 Market St., Pocomoke, Md. 

Roberta Boak, K K T, Latin 1111 Pennsylvania Ave., Oakmont, Pa. 

J. Russell 'Qom< , Biology 715 Washington St., Reading, Pa. 

Marion Lillian Bonner, a T, French 303 Highland Ave., Kutztown, Pa. 

Elinor Brecht, £k^/m/j 539 George St., Norristown, Pa. 

Mary Margaret Brown, Mathematics 305 E. State St., Pendleton, Ind. 

Thomas McPherson Brown, * K *, Economics . 1622 29th St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 

Linda Ann Bufpington, a r. Education Rising Sun, Md. 

John Augustus Bullard, * a e. Elect. Engineering . 2200 North Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Eleanor Stewart Burch, English 5208 Drexel Road, Philadelphia, Pa. 

James Burgett Burr, K ^, Political Science 402 Linden Ave., Riverton, N. J. 

Joseph Dukes Calhoun, * K *, Political Science .... 500 Mohawk Ave., Norwood, Pa. 

Elizabeth Casselberry, K a e, Biology Wallingford, Pa. 

Howard Benjamin Cates, at, Economics 4018 Berry Ave., Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Linda Alice Chandler, S. Q, Mathematics 1008 Juniata Ave., Allentown, Pa. 

William Cresson Cheeseman, Economics 99 W. LaCrosse Ave., Lansdowne, Pa. 

Elizabeth Clack, K A e, Hw/«7 320 First Ave., Havre, Mont. 

Myer Cohen, Jr., £«^/w^ 1868 Columbia Road, Washington, D. C. 

Philip Elie Coleman, III, e 2 n. Physics Swarthmore, Pa. 

Walter Barton Coleman, £fo«o»zi« 22 E. 89th St., New York, N. Y. 

Henry Walton Coles, a T, Economics 224 E. Main St., Moorestown, N. J. 

Oliver Hammond Coles, * 2 K, Economics 25 Bowen Ave., Woodstown, N.J. 

Marion Hannah Collins, K K r, English . . Sleepy Hollow Farm, Merchantville, N. J. 

Horace Fenelon Darlington, * a e. Biology Pocopson, Pa. 

Robert Gates Dawes, * K *, English .... 5014 Penn St., Frankford, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Jack Dbacq-n, Engineering . 237 Mohawk Ave., Norwood, Pa. 

William Wesley Delaney, * A 6, Engineering 601 W. Lockhart St., Sayre, Pa. 

Dalny Elma Doughman, * M, Biology Grampian, Pa. 

Howard Mortimer Drake, * 2 K, Political Science 223 Elm St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Louise V. Eaton, £««i:/j 218 Briggs St., Harrisburg, Pa. 



Page One Hundred and Thirty-six 



Halcyon 



James D. Egleson, e S n, Engineering Ridley Park, Pa. 

Catherine Higley Emhardt, n B *, Trench .... 51 Westview Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Alice Entrekin, F««i:/:> 218 Rutgers Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Olive Osgood Filer, ffij-/«3' 1900 Pacific Ave., Atlantic City, N. J. 

Robert Earl Fix, K S, Economics Twin Falls, Ida. 

Anna Carolyn Forstner, K K r, French 918 Fillmore St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Sara-Chace Franklin, n b *, English . 440 Mt. Stephen Ave., Montreal, Quebec, Canada 

WiLMER Krusen Gallager, e 2 w, Biology 504 W. 7th St., Chester, Pa. 

Raymond Sanford Garber, a T, Economics 2806 Cathedral Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 

Constance Sarah Gaskill, Erench 12 Oak Park Road, Asheville, N. C. 

Mary Elizabeth George, a r, Erench Amesbury Road, Haverhill, Mass. 

Ralph Andrew Gram, * 2 K, English 433 Ludington Ave., Menominee, Mich. 

Jane Perry Griest, a r, English Barnesboro, Pa. 

Marion Millicent Hall, X n, £»^/ij-A .... 6006 33rd St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 
Howard Thomas Hallowell, Jr., a T, Economics ... 300 Summit Ave., Jenkintown, Pa. 

Donald Myers Hamilton, e 2 n. Biology 213 Trites Ave., Norwood, Pa. 

Marion Comly Harris, K a e, English Moylan-Rose Valley, Pa. 

Grace Dawson Heritage, Mathematics Swedesboro, N. J. 

■Joseph William Hertle, Po//V/frf/i"cif«« 940 N. 5th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mary Elizabeth HiLLES, * M, F»-«»c/^ 21 Jacoby St., Norristown, Pa. 

Malcolm Hodge, K 2, Ptftofrf/ i'aVwf 321 S. 46th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Agnes Lawson Hood, K A e, Hm?o):> 147 Sumac St., Wissahickon, Pa. 

Elizabeth Ingram Hoopes, n B *, Mathematics Avondale, Pa. 

Anna Walton Hull, £^afrf/M« 3510 Duvall Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Bertha Broomell Hull, £w^/w/^ 2603 Lyndhurst Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Alice Hutchinson, £»^/i.f/:' 154 Westervelt Ave., Plainfield, N. J. 

Paul Marshall James, * 2 K, Biology ...'.. 4823 Warrington Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

George Hay Kain, * a e, Political Science 45 Springettsbury Place, York, Pa. 

Leroy Rudolph Kaltreider, e 2 n. Economics 202 W. Broadway, Red Lion, Pa. 

Julia Ann Kehew, K A e. History Bradford Woods, Pa. 

Parker Powell King, £«5i«wi«^ 714 Second Ave., Williamsport, Pa. 

Louis Laubach Kumpf, * 2 K, Political Science 30 Union St., Mt. Holly, N.J. 

Helen Vilona Larzelere, * M, Erench 25 Harwood Ave., Upper Darby, Pa. 

William Edwin Lednum, Jr., Economics Easton, Md. 

Morris Matthews Lee, Jr., * 2 K, English, College and Princeton Aves., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Anne SwENEY Lefever, K K r, £k^/m/3 317 S. 46th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Amy C. Loftin, n ^ ■i>. Economics 752 Vine St., Chattanooga, Tenn. 

John Francis McBride, K 2, Economics 66 Hartley Road, Lansdowne, Pa. 

Wilbur Morris McFeely, K 2, £<:<?«««/« .... 5834 Florence Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Horace McGuiRE, ^ t , Economics 513 N. William St., Dayton, Ohio 

Will McLain, III, ■!> A e. Economics 5860 Harriett St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Allison Saybolt McMiLLiN, £»^/ij-/j . . . 2238 Park Ave., Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Mary Martin Magruder, n B *, Mathematics, 6202 Walnut Lane, Cedarcroft, Baltimore, Md. 

Mat^y Mh^GA^TiT: M.A-LOTT, Political Science 345. S. First St., Globe, Ariz. 

Frank Harrison Martin, Jr., K 2, English . . . 5307 Woodbine Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Louise Mather, £««c/3 116 S. 19th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

James Albert Michener, * a e, English 81 N. Clinton St., Doylestown, Pa. 

Florence Antoinette Miller, Chemistry 6009 N. 11th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Ralph Molyneux Mitchell, Jr., K 2, Chemical Engineering, Fort Kamehameha, Honolulu, T. H. 

Thomas Richard Moore, * S K, Engineering 417 Linden Ave., Riverton, N. J. 

Hallie Isabel Morgan, Biology Knightstown, Ind. 

Walter Allen Muir, * S K, Economics 137 E. Broad St., Bethlehem, Pa. 

EvARiSTO Montalva Murray, English 50 Barrow St., New York, N. Y. 

Alice Roberta Norton, Latin 1420 Washington Ave., Chester, Pa. 

Elizabeth Morton Ogden, n b *, English 1003 Park Ave., Plainfield, N. J. 

Cora Elizabeth Palmenberg, K K r, English Spring Valley, N. Y. 

Gertrude Hervey Paxson, n B *, English .... 302 S. Walnut St., West Chester, Pa. 

Mary Elizabeth Pearson, English 209 N. 50th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Eleanor Frost Powell, n B *, English 42-23 165th St., Flushing, N. Y. 

Fred Jackson Powell, Engineering 42'1'5 165th St., Flushing, N. Y. 

Elizabeth White Reynolds, Biology 234 E. Third St., Media, Pa. 

William M. Rice, English 1313 S. Boston Ave., Tulsa, Okla. 

Charles Thorne Ricker, a T, Biology 46 Fairview Place, Phillipsburg, N. J. 

Helen Caroline Robison, X n, French 404 High St., Bethlehem, Pa. 

Albion Ross, English . 117 Allegheny St., Hollidaysburg, Pa. 

Agnes Louise Russell, X Q, English Glenside, Pa. 

Henry Bowman Seaman, Jr., Economics 363 Grand Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Walter Raymond Seibert, K Z, Mathematics 445 S. 51st St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ralph Stryker Selover, * a e. Engineering . . . 1165 St. John's Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Victor Russell Selover, * a e. Engineering . . . 1165 St. John's Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Thomas Philip Sharpless, a T, Economics 510 Forest Road, Roland Park, Md. 

Dorothy Shoemaker, a r. Political Science 82 Eastern Ave., Takoma, D. C. 

Daniel Fox Smith, £«^/zj-/j 19 N. Main St., Medford, N. J. 

Harold Edward Snyder, * a e, Econotnics . . 2352 W. McMicken St., Cincinnati, Ohio 
Harold Elam Snyder, Z n, Education .... 536 Chew St., Olney, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Donovan Boucher Spangler, * a O, Engineering Swarthmore, Pa. 

Martha Jeanette Stauffer, * M, Mathematics . . . 1516 N. Second St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Sophie Mathilde Stervi, English 1524 N. 16th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Shaler Stidham, a t, Political Science . . . . 3322 Newark St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 

Fred Rothwell Taylor, K S, Economics 209 Yale Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Betty Louise Thompson, n B *, English Woodside Farm, Kennett Square, Pa. 

Lily Tily, n B *, French 113 Edgehill Road, Bala, Pa. 

Richard Van Kleeck, 6 2 n, English 208 Creswell St., Ridley Park, Pa. 

Wanda May Veasey, a r, French Pocomoke City, Md. 

Winona Von Ammon, Biology 3920 Northampton St., Washington, D. C. 

Margaret Brosius Walton, k k r, English George School, Pa. 

Mary Walton, n B *, French Swarthmore, Pa. 

Frederick George Weigand, e 2 n, C/seOTzW £«^/«f«7«^, 4025 Comly St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Francis Fisher White, * K *, Political Science, 138 N. Harrisburg Ave., Atlantic City, N. J. 
JosiAH White, Jr., * K *, Engineering . . 138 N. Harrisburg Ave., Atlantic City, N. J. 

William Baldwin Wickersham, Engineering 125 St. Paul's Road, Ardmore, Pa. 

Mary Alice Williams, Mathematics 921 Fayette Ave., Conshohocken, Pa. 

Sylvia Chalfont Windle, K a e, French Dellwyn, West Chester, Pa. 

Howard John Wood, * K *, Engineering Edgemoor, Del. 

Margaret Worth, K a e, English Claymont, Del. 



?mA.LCYO^ 




S^ALCYON 



Members of the Class of 1930 

Theodora Gladys Abbott, * M, Mathematics . . 3206 W. Dauphin St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dorothy Agnes Ackart, K K r, History 2310 W. 17th St., Wilmington, Del. 

Francis Carter Alden, a r. Engineering . . . . ^ . . 334 S. 43rd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Alice Calista Atkinson, English 9 Glenwood Ave., E. Northfield, Mass. 

Betty Loynd Bamberger, * M, English, History . . .2436 W. 18th St., Wilmington, Del. 

Frances A. Bates, K a *, French Mountain Lakes, N. J. 

Anna Elizabeth Bennett, X 12, English 52 E. 84th St., New York City 

Helen Cecile Bessemer, English 1608 H. St., Washington, D. C. 

Anna L. Biddle, K a e. Mathematics Riverton, N. J. 

Robert Forsythe Bishop, <J> K *, Political Science . . 736 Harvard Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Adaline Blackburn, English 232 E. Penn St., Bedford, Pa. 

William Anton Boone, * a 6, Economics 209 Oakwood Ave., Ottumwa, Iowa 

Robert Lippincott Booth, AT, Economics 975 Cedar Brook Road, Plainfield, N.J. 

Howard Eavenson Boyer, * S K, Economics 714 N. 5th St., Reading, Pa. 

Sarah Wood Brecht, English 539 George St., Norristown, Pa. 

Louis Sloan Bringhurst, * Z K, Biology Felton, Del. 

Howard Francis Brown, K 2, Economics 122 N. Ogden Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Donald Everett Buckwell, * S K, Economics .... 874 Greene Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Helen Pauline Calhoun, X S2, History 500 Mohawk Ave., Norwood, Pa. 

Barton Calvert, Afflied Science 323 S. Chester Road, Swarthmore, Pa. 

Harold Frederick Carter, Economics 121 Chestnut St., Port Monmouth, N.J. 

Alice Casey, n b *, Fretich 405 Harvard Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Rebecca Schoch Castle, n B *, English Wayne, Pa. 

Carroll Bunting Chipley, English 121 E. Linn St., Bellefonte, Pa. 

RusTH Blackburn Cleaver, AT 205 President Ave., Rutledge, Pa. 

Henry B. Coles, Jr., at. Political Science 224 E. Main St., Moorestown, N. J. 

Marvin Roberts Coles, English 30 E. Oak Ave., Bronxville, N. J. 

Marian Lillian Colson, Latin R.F.D., No. 3, Woodstown, N.J. 

Garret Edward Conklin, <j> 2 K, Economics 1 Gard Ave., Bronxville, N.J. 

JuLiEN Davies Cornell, * K *, English 43 Willow St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Robert Currier DaCosta, English . . 8419 Anderson St., Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Nancy Deane, X SJ, English 100 Poplar St., Ridley Park, Pa. 

C. Edward DePuy, Political Science 105 S. 8th St., Stroudsburg, Pa. 

William Downton, Engineering 236 Dickinson Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Frances E. Eaton, X Q, History 105 South St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Franklin Cornell Eden, e 2 n. Political Science, 4915 Monument Road, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Robert Shaw Eikenberry, F/r'j'j-ia ........ 204 Analomink St., E. Stroudsburg, Pa. 

Edgar Isadore Eisenstaedt, Chemistry . . 616 Crescent St., Highland Park, Chicago, 111. 

Jean Tench Fahringer, K K r, English Audenried, Pa. 

Virginia Burrough Fell, X Q, French 611 Swede St., Norristown, Pa. 

Haines Ball Felter, Econotnics 4511 Groveland Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Jack Howard Fergus, Electrical Engineering 331 E. State St., Media, Pa. 

Barton Burdy Ferris, * K *, Political Science . . . 340 Irving Ave., Port Chester, N. Y. 

Sarah Fisher, K K r, English Arlington, Vt. 

Eleanor Flexner, Social Science 150 E. 72nd St., New York City 

Catherine Marguerite Foster, X n, English .... 107 W. Penn St., Germantown, Pa. 

Ada Palmer Fuller, n B *, English 305 Elm Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Warner Wallace Gardner, e 2 n. Chemistry . ... 72 Barrow St., New York, City 
Cecilia Alma Garrigues, French 2 Forley St., Elmhurst, N. Y. 



Marian West Geare, K K r, English 310 Elm Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Robert Lisle Gould, * S K, Mathematics Locust Valley, Towson, Md. 

WiLLARD WiNCHELL Grant, *Ae 627 Library Place, Evanston, 111. 

Merida Grey, n B *, Biology 712 Wynnewood Road, W. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Margaret Gurney, M^?/w«^?/« 1217 Gallatin St., N. \V., Washington, D. C. 

Helen Rebecca Hadley, K K T, English 320 W. Lansaster Ave., Wayne, Pa. 

Charles Bertram Hammell, K 2, Economics Absecon, N.J. 

Marian Hamming, K K r, English 35 Heights Terrace, Ridgewood, N. J. 

Anna Livingston Hanan, n B *, Latin .... 1222 Albemarle Road, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Elizabeth Keiser Harbold, <!> JI, History 343 College Ave., Lancaster, Pa. 

Helen Lanius Harry, * M, English Pylesville, Md. 

David Charles Haskell, Engineering Warrensburg, N. Y. 

Emma Catherine Hatfield, K a e, English 5540 Blackstone Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Benjamin Carpenter Haviland, * S K, Economics .... 515 E. Oak St., Millville, N.J. 

Helen Blanche Heacock Bedford, Pa. 

Helen Margaret Headley, £«^/z'j/5 350 Main St., Madison, N. J. 

Charles Enos Hepford, Jr., Engineering 100 N. Chester Road, Glenalden, Pa. 

Eloise Eveline Strecker Hettinger, Latin . . . 1325 Mineral Spring Road, Reading, Pa. 

Harry Heward, Jr., K Z, Economics 6146 Columbia Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Eldridge Milton Hiller, * a e. Engineering 679 Broadway, Flushing, L. I. 

George Burnham Hoadley, * a e. Engineering . . . 518 Walnut Lane, Swarthmore, Pa. 

Ray Perkins Hunt, * 2 K, Engineering 30 Pennington Ave., Morton, Pa. 

Charles Coombs Huston, a T, Engineering, 

620 Beechwood Drive, Beechwood Park, Upper Darby, Pa. 
Ruth Wilson Jackson, K A 6, French .... 6445 Greene St., Mt. Airy, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ellis Lewis Jacob, Engineering Moylan, Pa. 

Eleanor Janney, French Bridge St., New Hope, Pa. 

Eleanor Foulke Jenkins, K a O, English Gwynedd, Pa. 

Howard Cooper Johnson, Jr., a T, Economics . 101 W. Mermaid Lane, Chestnut Hill, Pa. 
Richard Morgan Kain, * a e. Political Science ... 45 Springettsburg Place, York, Pa. 
Yuri Alberta Kawakami, * M, Political Science . . 1906 Biltmore St., Washington, D. C. 

Nox McCain Kehew, e 2 n. Economics Bradford Woods, Pa. 

Horace Dietz Keller, Jr., Engineering 807 S. George St., York, Pa. 

Edward Morgan Lapham, Jr., * a e. Economics . . Port Washington, Long Island, N. Y. 

Jane Romine Large, History 2825 W. Somerset St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lois Day Larzelere, * M, French 25 Harwood Ave., Upper Darby, Pa. 

Walter Kirkbride La Tour, Engineering Mount Holly, N. J. 

John Russell LeCron, K 2, Economics 3133 Huey Ave., Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Philip Leigh, K 2, Economics 105 N. Delancey Place, Atlantic City, N. J. 

Edward Needles Lippincott, * k *, Political Science, 

145 S. North Carolina Ave., Atlantic City, N. J. 
Malcolm Rettew Longshore, a T, Economics .... 8203 Cedar Road, Elkins Pa^rk, Pa. 
Alexander James McCloskey, Jr., * 2 K, Political Science, 600 W. Ninth St., Chester, Pa. 
Norman Hugh McDiarmid, a T, Economics, 1824 Belmont Road, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Mary Emma McKenzie, Mtf?/jfOT^/-/'cj- 824 N. 63rd St., W. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Douglas A. MacMurchy, £«_g/«f«7»^ 504 Harrison St., Ridley Park, Pa. 

Margaret McCurley Maltbie, Mathematics 2030 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 

Kenneth Alexander Meiklejohn, * 2 n. Philosophy . . 2113 Adams St., Madison, Wis. 

Eugene Harold Mercer, a T, Biology 241 N. Union St., Kennett Square, Pa. 

Morton Aubrey Milne, * 2 n, Economics Fox Chase, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lewis R. Minster, Mathematics Buck Hill Falls, Pa. 

Mildred Gibson Muir, English 128 Drexel Road, Ardmore, Pa. 



7/halcyon 



Thomas Shyrock Nicely, * K *, Engineering 424 S. 47th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mary Ann Ogden, K K r, English .... 3332 N. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Henry Lippincott Parrish, * K *, Economics Riverton, N. J. 

Edward Martindale Passmore, * K *, Econotnics . . . 629 W. Granite St., Butte, Mont. 

William Poole, * a e. Political Science 1311 Clayton St., Wilmington, Del. 

Sarah Hopper Powell, KAB 130 E. 20th St., New York City 

Margaret Dexter Read, K K r. Mathematics . . . 5108 Chester Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Robert Brittain Redman, * a G, Engineering 608 W. LockhartSt., Sayre, Pa. 

Marion Smedley Reynolds, X n, English Woodland Ave., Malvern, Pa. 

Anna Margaret Rickards, IIB* 810 Prospect Ave. , Moore, Pa. 

Edward John Roth, Engineering 4400 Cathedral Ave., Washington, D. C. 

Laurence Myers Russell, a T, Education 632 Euclid Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Eva Louise Scarlett, n b *, English 142 W. Market St., West Chester, Pa. 

Frederick C. Schreiber, K 2, Biology 1361 S. W. 7th St., Miami, Fla. 

George Cecil Sherman, * 2 K, Political Science .... 6 S. Argyle Ave., Margate, N. J. 

Katherine Smedley, K a 0, French Cornwall, N. Y. 

J. Stewart' Smith, Political Scietice Swarthmore, Pa. 

Paul Cecil Smith, K 2, Engineering 317 Warwick Road, Haddonfield, N. J. 

Margaret Elizabeth Spencer, * il, English .... 810 W. 25th St., Wilmington, Del. 

Helen Georgia Stafford, Mathematics 151 E. James St., Lancaster, Pa. 

Marion Staley, n b *, English 205 W. Garden St., Rome, N. Y. 

John Hinchman Stokes, Jr., a T, Biology 201 Elm Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Virginia Barnes Stratton, a r. Mathematics 402 E. Hickory St., Neosho, Mo. 

Paul Theodore Strong, * 2 K, Biology 815 Peach St., Vineland, N. J. 

Eloise C. Suhrie, Social Science 5 Wendover Road, Montclair, N. J. 

Joseph Thomas Sullivan, a T, Economics 8134 Cedar Road, Elkins Park, Pa. 

Henry George Swain, Mathematics 13 Everett St., E. Orange, N. J. 

Clara Bond Taylor, Biology 530 Riverview Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Jackson Taylor, K 2, Economics 209 Yale Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Mary Beaumont Temple, n B *, Mathematics . . 307 S. Chester Road, Swarthmore, Pa. 

DwiGHT Turner Thompson, Engineering Warren, Pa. 

Ferris Thomsen, a T, Economics 4 Midvale Road, Baltimore, Md. 

Harold Brown Thomson, * a O, Political Science Basking Ridge, N. J. 

Ralph Winfield Tipping, K 2, Chemistry 1347 S. 54th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

osephine Maria Tremain, X fi, English .... 8 Bryant St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Mary Perkins Trimble, K a e, English R. R. 7, Hopkinsville, Ky. 

Howard Haines Turner, * K ■*■, Political Science . . 28 Munroe Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Selina Elizabeth Turner, * M, French 710 E. 20th St., Chester, Pa. 

Mildred L. Underwood, K K r, English 609 Mahontonga St., Pottsville, Pa. 

Myra Frances Vickery, French 330 Spruce St., Steel ton. Pa. 

Harold E. Wagner, $ K *, Economics Greenwich, Conn. 

Abner Goodwin Walter, K 2 , Economics 436 Center St., Ashland, Pa. 

William Wallace Welsh, Biology Rockville, Md. 

Stanley Irving Winde, * A e. Engineering 215 James St., Waukesha, Wis. 

Dorothy Frances Wolf, * M, Latin Providence Road, Media, Pa. 

Orville Reisler Wright, K 2, Engineering 3401 Clifton Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Elizabeth Hickcox Yard, X a. Social Science Wallace Lodge, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Louise K. Yerkes, k a e, English 4852 Kenwood Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Ralph Wickersham Yoder, Economics . 8411 106th St., Richmond Hill, Long Island, N. Y. 




m 



Campus 



Page One Hundred and Forty-five 



Commencement 



CHILL winds, unseasonable weather and rain, which fell intermittently 
throughout the whole of commencement week, enhanced rather than 
detracted from the dignity and solemnity of the ceremonies which marked 
the passing of another class, that of Nineteen Hundred Twenty Six, from the 
halls of S^varthmore College. 

Class Day dawned rainy and dull. It was not long, however, before the 
address of Class President Shuster, the class history, written by Robert 
Graham, the class poem, written by George Clothier, the class will, written 
by Dorothy Merrill and the humorous gifts presented to each member of the 
class by Edward Bartlett had made the day a great success. Clear skies 
warranted the fine performance of the Senior Play, "Prunella," in the twi- 
light of the Magill auditorium. 

On Alumni Day the class of '16, depicting Dr. Miller's Sumatra Ex- 
pedition, won the prize for the best costumed class as well as the prize for 
the class with the greatest proportion of its members back. A 7-3 victory 
over Haverford in baseball gave the returning Alumni an opportunity to see 
another contest between the old Quaker rivals. The Alumni Banquet, pre- 
sided over by Joseph H. Willits, '11, brought the eventful day to a close. 

Dr. Stephen S. Wise, Rabbi of the Free Synagogue and President of the 
Jewish Institute of Religion, delivered the Baccalaureate Address on Sunday 
in the Meeting House. The topic of his inspiring sermon was, "What Men 
Live By . " As a climax to the services of the day Richard M. Perdew delivered 
the Ivy Oration after the class ivy had been planted. 

The commencement exercises of the fifty-fourth Senior Class of Swarth- 
more College were held in Collection Hall. One hundred and eight students, 
of whom twenty-four were honors students, received degrees. The Com- 
mencement Address was delivered by Sir Robert Falconer, President of the 
University of Toronto, on "College Aristocrats." Various honorary awards 
and scholarships were announced by President Aydelotte and the diplomas 
given to the graduating class. The Ivy Medal was given to Richard M. 
Perdew while Lydia Roberts was the recipient of the Oak Leaf Medal. As 
the strains of Alma Mater rose and died away in the halls of Parrish, another 
chapter in the annals of Swarthmore College was concluded. 



^ALCYON 



Founders' Day 

THE fifty-seventh anniversary of the founding of Sv^^arthmore College 
proved an event which will be long remembered by all who participated 
in it. For the second consecutive year the untimely presence of Jupiter 
Pluvius necessitated the holding of the events of the afternoon in Collection 
Hall rather than, as was planned, in the Magill Outdoor Auditorium. 

Although the inclemency of the weather made the customary outside 
academic procession impossible, yet the warmth of the celebration within 
seemed to be not one whit lessened. There were few vacant chairs in Collec- 
tion Hall when the junior class, resplendent in blue coats and white trousers 
or skirts, marched down the aisles, completing the academic procession led 
by Dr. W. R. Wright who was followed by the faculty, the Board of Mana- 
gers, and the senior class in cap and gown. 

Following the singing of "America," Howard Cooper Johnson, '96, a 
member of the Board of Managers, read the one hundred and eleventh 
psalm. President Frank Aydelotte spoke of the financial standing of the 
college, mentioning in particular the donation of Clement M. Biddle, Jr., 
ex '96 of $70,000 for a library of Quaker literature. He also discussed the new 
system adopted of holding only two required collections each week. Wilson 
M. Powell, president of the Board of Managers, spoke briefly concerning 
Swarthmore scholarship and her selective method of admitting freshmen. 

Roscoe Pound, Dean of the Harvard Law School, and a member of the 
Swarthmore Friends' Meeting was introduced as the principal speaker of the 
afternoon. Dean Pound delivered a convincing address on the subject of 
' 'Individualism and the Individual Life. ' ' He showed the growing tendency of 
our law-making bodies to treat each individual case as if there never had been 
anything like it before and could never be anything like it in the future. 
At the close of his address, alumni, friends and students of the college united 
in singing "Alma Mater." 

The strains of "Alma Mater" had scarcely died out in Collection Hall 
when a cheer was heard on Swarthmore Field as the Garnet eleven ran out 
prepared to meet Ursinus in a football game. The game played on a muddy 
field resulted in a victory for Swarthmore by the narrow margin of six to three. 

While the football game was being played, the faculty of the college 
held an informal reception for alumni and friends of the college in the Mana- 
gers' Parlors. 

The closing feature of Founders Day was an address entitled "Patriotism 
Here and Elsewhere" by Dr. Jesse H. Holmes, head of the department of 
philosophy. Dr. Holmes showed clearly the foolishness of narrow patriotism 
which, seeing no fault in itself, judges other races by its own standards. 



Cooper Foundation 



THE Cooper Foundation is a fund which was established by William J. 
Cooper for the purpose of bringing to the College speakers of intellectual 
reputation. The committee in charge of administering this fund has been 
especially successful this year. Its speakers have been as varied in their 
personalities as in the points of view which they have offered to Swarth- 
more. Half of the money is used in obtaining a few persons of unusual 
importance or interest to speak to the students as a whole and to friends 
of the college. The rest enables the different departmental and social clubs 
to secure speakers along their particular lines which they would otherwise 
be unable to have. 

Under the direct auspices of the Cooper Foundation, Miss Margaret 
Deneke gave a delightful piano lecture recital on Dance Forms, on December 
third. Donald MacMillan, the famous arctic explorer, entertained the college 
with a splendid illustrated lecture of "Arctic Explorations," on February 
eleventh. On March twenty-second, Lorado Taft gave a lecture demon- 
stration on "How Statues are Made." On April fifteenth, Thomas Whitney 
Surette came to the college with the famous Russian String Quartette in a 
very beautiful Brahms lecture-concert. Also, it was through the Cooper 
Foundation that Dean Roscoe Pound of Harvard spoke to the college on 
Founders' Day. 

During the past year several shorter lectures in Collection have been made, 
including those by Dr. S. Rhadakrishna, a philosopher of India, Miss Lucy 
Gardner, Dr. Leon M. Pearson, Mr. W. LeRoy Anspach, and Bliss Carman, 
the well-known poet. 

Among the speakers to the student clubs who were obtained with the 
generosity of the Cooper Foundation are many well-known persons. Dr. 
Joseph S. Ames, and Dr. Arthur L. Day, Director of the Geological Labora- 
tory of the Carnegie Institute, spoke at meetings of Sigma Xi . Evans Woolens 
talked to the Swarthmore chapter of Phi Beta Kappa. An event worthy of 
note was the exhibition of Russian folk dancing, by Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
Timbres, brought about by the efforts of the Somerville Forum. The Bettis 
Academy Glee Club performed before a meeting of the Y.M.C.A. and the 
Y.W.C.A. of the college. Professor A. T. Murray, of Hamilton College, 
spoke to the members of the Classical Club. Under the auspices of the Forum, 
Kenneth Lindsay, and Harry W. Laidler came to Swarthmore. 




e Hundred and Forty-eight 



TiALCYO^ 



Women's Student Building 

THE campaign for the Women's Student Building at Swarthmore has been 
progressing now for two years. Although this drive is being carried on 
by the Alumnae and ex-students of Swarthmore College, the undergraduates 
wished to show their interest in this project. One thousand dollars was 
decided as the goal toward which the college women would work. 

There have been many ways in which money has been raised. Last 
spring a bridge tournament was held. Practically the whole college turned 
out for this and the returns accordingly were great. The undergraduates 
made pledges before leaving college which were to extend over the summer 
since the women themselves felt that it would be easier to save at this time 
than during the college year, while others would work and thereby earn 
money which they could give. In the late fall of last year a drive was made. 
A large percentage of the women students made pledges which amounted 
to about $60. 

Half the returns of this year's Hamburg Show, amounting to $132, was 
turned over to the Women's Student Building Fund. On March 10th the 
Players Club of Swarthmore presented Penrod, a comedy by Booth Tarkington, 
for the benefit of the fund. Both Alumnae and undergraduates worked to 
sell tickets for this. 

At the end of last year almost a third of the required amount for the 
Women's Student Building was subscribed. This year the work has progressed 
rapidly and the Policy Committee, whose chairman is Lydia Williams 
Roberts, '97, has raised almost the entire amount. Ground will be broken 
for the Women's Student Building this spring. 




jl^ALCYO^ 



Gifts to the College 

SWARTHMORE IS indeed happy in having such actively interested alumni 
and friends. The past year has been an especially fortunate one, as it 
has seen the realization of many hopes for the college. 

First of all, Morris L. Clothier, '90, supplied the finishing touch needed 
to complete the Alumni Field for w^hich he has already done so much. 
Through his generosity a large steel and concrete grand-stand, seating nearly 
two thousand, was erected, and dedicated at the first football game. 

It was not many weeks later that Clement M. Biddle, ex. '96, donated 
$70,000 to be used for a new library and reading room, as a memorial to his 
father, Clement M. Biddle, a member of the Board of Managers from 1869 to 
1894. The new library will run parallel to the present one and will be con- 
nected with it by the new reading room which will form the cross-piece of 
the H-shaped building. The Friends' Historical library will be moved to 
this new building and the records of many Friends' meetings will also be 
kept there, making possible much valuable research work. This addition 
to the library will nearly double the space where students may study. 

And last came the gift of Mrs. Isaac H. Clothier as a memorial to her 
husband who has been such a prominent figure in Swarthmore history. This 
gift of $100,000 has since been increased by other members of the family, 
and will be used for an auditorium to take the place of the inadequate Collec- 
tion Hall. Architects have been consulted and different sites are being con- 
sidered for the new structure. 




Page One Hundred and 





Interfraternity Council 



p. BuRDETTE Lewis, '27 



KAPPA SIGMA 



Harold S. Berry, '2S 



John K. DeGroot, '27 



PHI KAPPA PSI 



Theodore H. Fetter, '28 



A. Sidney Johnson, '27 



DELTA UPSILON 



Arthur G. Baker, '28 



Walter S. Studdiford, '27 



PHI SIGMA KAPPA 



Theodore Smithers, '28 



Robert L. Lindahl, '27 



PHI DELTA THETA 



George A. Hay, '28 



Henry C. Ford, '27 



THETA SIGMA PI 



Everett U. Irish, '28 



'Theodore K. Suckow, '27 



WHARTON CLUB 



J. James Coughlin, '28 




Hundred and Fifty 





Pan-Hellenic Council 



KAPPA ALPHA THETA 
Leah W. Shreiner, '27 Mary T. Sullivan, '28 



PI BETA PHI 



Lois Thompson, '27 



Katherine E. Rittenhouse, '28 



KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 
Marion E. Palmenberg, '27 Frances E. Fogg, '28 

DELTA GAMMA 
R. Esther Howard, '27 ' Charlotte S. Salmon, '28 

CHI OMEGA 

Louise M. Parkhurst, '27 Gertrude H. Bowers, '28 

PHI MU 

Frances D. Mc Cafferty, '27 Nell A. Rubins, '28 




One Hundred and Fij, 






Kappa Sigma 

PI CHAPTER 



Founded 1869 



Thomas Greenwood Best 
Albert Cairns Cliff 
Russell Robert Harris 
Robert Fetter Lee 
Parker Burdette Lewis 



Established 1888 



ACTIVE CHAPTER 
Seniors 



Richard Harding McFeely 
James Roland Pennock 
Pierce Leon Richards 
William John Rust 
David Franklin Silver 



Theodore George Van Hart 



Harold Silver Berry 
Vanleer III Bond 
Abner Lincoln Castle 
Charles Gordon Hodge, Jr. 



Juniors 



Roy James Kersey 
Edward Cary McFeely 
Raymond Albert Townley 
Theodore Widing 



Albert Francis Wiessler 



Albert Engles Blackburn, Jr. 

James Burgett Burr 

Robert Earl Fix 

Malcolm Hodge 

Frank Harrison Martin, Jr. 



Howard Brown 
Charles Bertram Hammell 
Harry Heward, Jr. 
John LeCron 
Philip Leigh 



Sophomores 



Freshmen 



John Francis McBride 
Wilbur Morris McFeely 
Ralph Molyneux Mitchell 
Walter Raymond Seibert 
Fred Rothwell Taylor 



Frederick Shreiber 
Paul Charles Smith 
Jackson Taylor 
Ralph Winfield Tipping 
Abner Goodwin Walter 



Orville Reisler Wright 



ImALCYO^ 





imALCYO^ 




Phi Kappa Psi 

PENNSYLVANIA KAPPA CHAPTER 



Founded 1852 



Ellwood Richard Burdsall 
Robert Baird Clothier 
John Keed Degroot 
John Haines Lippincott, Jr. 



Seniors 



Established 1889 



ACTA'E CHAPTER 



Horace Harrison Smith 
Stephen Bromley Tily, Jr. 
Jacob Paxton Unger 
Robert Allen Ward 



Ellis Graham Bishop 
Vincent Gilpin Bush 
Louis Ketterlinus Clothier 



J" 



James Hamilton Colket, Jr. 
Theodore Henry Fetter 
Richard Lippincott 



Charles Thoburn Maxwell 



Curtis Lyon Barnes 
Ira Winslow Barnes, Jr. 
Thomas McPherson Brown 
Joseph Dukes Calhoun 



Sophomores 



Robert Gates Dawes 
Francis Fisher White 
JosiAH White, Jr. 
Howard John Wood 



Fresh) 



Robert Forsythe Bishop 
JuLiEN Davies Cornell 
Barton Purdy Ferris 
Edward Needles Lippincott 



Thomas Shryock Nicely 
Henry Lippincott Parrish 
Edward Passmore 
Howard Haines Turner 



Harold Edmund Wagner 




^ALCYO^ 




Delta Upsilon 

SWARTHMORE CHAPTER 



Founded 1834 



Established 1893 



ACTIVE CHAPTER 



George Martin Booth 
Albert Sidney Johnson, Jr. 
Robert Emerson Lamb Johnson 
Robert White Lafore 



Arthur Gorham Baker 
John Walton Dutton 
William Andrew Gowdy 
Holbrook Mann MacNeille 
William Cameron McCook 



Christian Bert Adelman 
Howard Benjamin Cates 
Henry Walton Coles 
Raymond Sanford Garber 



Seniors 



Juniors 



So-phomores 



Samuel Copeland Palmer, Jr. 
William Clendenin Pickett 
Girard Bliss Ruddick 
Herbert Knight Taylor, Jr. 



Griffith Stansbury Miller 
Thomas Moore, Jr. 
Douglass Winnett Orr 
Henry Thomas Paiste, Jr. 
Newlin Russell Smith 



Howard Thomas Hallowell, Jr. 
Horace McGuire 
Charles Thorne Ricker 
Thomas Philip Sharples 



Shaler Stidham 



Freshmen 



Francis Carter Alden 
Robert Lippincott Booth 
Henry Braid Coles, Jr. 
Charles Huston 
Howard Cooper Johnson, Jr. 
Malcolm Longshore 



Hugh McDiarmid 
Harold Mercer 
Lawrence Myers Russell 
John Hinchman Stokes 
Joseph Thomas Sullivan, II 
Ferris Thomsen 



^mALCYO^ 



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TiALCYO^ 




Phi Sigma Kappa 

PHI CHAPTER 



Founded 1873 



Established 1906 



ACTIVE CHAPTER 



Senion 



William Turner Clack 
Paul Milton Kistler 
Edward Frederic Lang 
George Wilson McKeag 
Samuel Robert Means Reynolds 



Charles Frazer Hadley, Jr. 
Alexander Duncan MacDougall 
James Russell Miller 



Juniors 



Charles Edwin Rickards 
Jack Comly Shoemaker 
Robert Miller Stabler 
Walter Speer Studdiford 
Jack Thompson 



James Nicol Muir, Jr. 
Theodore Egbert Nickles, Jr. 
Malcolm Bruce Petrikin 




Theodore Smithers 



Milton Job Atkinson 
Donald Webster Baxter 
Oliver Hammond Coles 
Howard Mortimer Drake 
Ralph Andrew Gram 



Sophomores 



Freshi 



Howard Eavenson Boyer 
Louis Sloan Bringhurst 
Donald Buckwell 
Garrett Edward Conklin 
Robert Lisle Gould 



Paul Marshall James 
Louis Laubach Kumpf 
Morris Matthews Lee, Jr. 
Thomas Richard Moore 
Walter Allen Muir 



Benjamin Haviland 
Ray Perkins Hunt 
Alexander McCloskey, Jr. 
George Sherman 
Paul Theodore Strong 



jmAlXYO^ 




Phi Delta Theta 



PENNSYLVANIA KAPPA CHAPTER 



Fcimded 1848 



Established 1918 



ACTIVE CHAPTER 



Seniors 



Leroy Gilbert Baum 
James Wright Chapman 
Albert Nicholson Garrett, Jr. 
Edward Cope Jenkins 



John Bradley Leypoldt 
Robert Leslie Lindahl 
James Heffner Sellers 
Charles Anthony Spangler 



Norman Henry Winde 



William Thomas Branen 
George Andrews Hay 
William Lincoln Simmons, Jr. 



John Augustus Bullard 
Horace Fenelon Darlington 
William Wesley Delaney' 
George Hay Kain, Jr. 
Will McLain, III 



Juniors 



So-phomores 



Charles Edward Tilton 
Selden Y. Trimble 
Robert Keyser Whitten 



James Albert Michener 
Ralph Stryker Selover 
Victor Russell Selover 
Harold Edward Sny'der 
Donovan Boucher Spangler 



Freshmen 



Charles Brooks Blaisdell 
William Anton Boone 
William Winchell Grant 
Eldredge Milton Hiller 
Richard Morgan Kain 



Edward Lapham 
William Poole 
Robert Redman 
Harold Brown Thomson 
Stanley Irving Winde 



'HALCYON 



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j^ALCYO^ 







Founded 1924 



Theta Sigma Pi 



Local Fraternity 



ACTIVE CHAPTER 



Seniors 



Henry Crawford Ford 
George Kelsey Gillette, Jr. 
Friend Davis Hunter 
Nolan Levi Kaltreider 



Thomas Culver Lightfoot 
Minter Holmes Norton 
Walter Oswald Simon 
Laurence Josiah Test 



Elmer Delaney Wilt, Jr. 

Juniors 
Thomas H. Latimer Foster Everett Underhill Irish 

Henry G. Albert Smith 



Philip Elie Coleman, III 
James Downey Egleson 
Wilmer Krusen Gallager 
Donald Myers Hamilton 



Sophc 



Leroy' Rudolph Kaltreider 
Harold Elam Snyder 
Richard Van Kleeck 
Frederick George Weigand 



Franklin Carnell Eden 
Warner Winslow Gardner 



Freshmen 



Morton Milne 



Nox McCain Kehew 
Kenneth A. Meiklejohn 





Founded 1870 



Kappa Alpha Theta 

ALPHA BETA CHAPTER 



Established 1891 



ACTIVE CHAPTER 



Margaret Stone Jameson 
Elizabeth Selby McCabe 



Caroline Cooper Biddle 
Alice Elizabeth Folwell 
Elisabeth Alice Jenkins 
Anne Kennedy 
Caroline Biddle Lippincott 



Elizabeth Casselberry 
Elizabeth Clack 
Marion Comly Harris 



Seniors 



Juniors 



Sophomores 



Amelia Catherine Miller 
Leah Wolfenden Shreiner 



Anne Hillborn Philips 
Esther Shallcross 
Edna Margaret Shoemaker 
Mary Thomson Sullivan 
Marietta Watson 



Agnes Lawson Hood 

Julia Ann Kehew 

Sylvia Chalfonte Windle 



Margaret Worth 



Frances Adelle Bates 
Anna Lippincott Biddle 
Emma Catharine Hatfield 
Ruth Wilson Jackson 



Freshmen 



Eleanor Foulke Jenkins 
Sarah Hopper Powell 
Katherine Smedley 
Mary Perkins Trimble 



Louise Kinsey Yerkes 



"halcyon 



Pi Beta Phi 



PENNSYLVANIA ALPHA CHAPTER 



Founded 1867 



Established 1892 



ACTR^E CHAPTER 



Seniors 



Carolyn Hearne 

Mary Josephine Hornaday 

Elizabeth Huey 

Ruth Longacre 

Ruth McCauley 

Anna Rebecca Meloney 



Mary Eleanor Meyer 

Lillian Pace 

Sarah Elizabeth Percy 

Lois Thompson 

Lydia Parry Turner 

Lucy Gertrude Whetzel 



Dorothy Wainwright Brown 
Phyllis Fearey Harper 
Mary Elizabeth Hopper 



Katherine Edna Rittenhouse 
Margaret Somerville 
Esther Hamilton Wilson 



Sophc 



Barbara Baker 

Catherine Higley Emhardt 

Sara-Chace Franklin 

Elizabeth Ingram Hoopes 

Amy Loftin 

Mary Martin Magruder 



Elizabeth Morton Ogden 
Gertrude Kervey Paxson 
Eleanor Frost Powell 
Elizabeth Louise Thompson 
Lily Tily 
Mary Walton 



Alice Casey 
Rebecca Castle 
Ada Palmer Fuller 
Merida Grey 



Freshmen 



Mary Temple 



Anna Hanan 

Anna Margaret Richards 

Eva Scarlett 

Marion Staley 



Page One Hundred and Sixly-eight 







One Hundred and Sixty-nine 




TIalcyonu 




Kappa Kappa Gamma 

BETA IOTA CHAPTER 



Founded 1870 



Established 1893 



ACTIVE CHAPTER 



Seniors 



Elizabeth Miller 
Marion Elsa PALME>fBERG 
Mary Marcia Perry 
Sarah Darlington Pratt 



Elizabeth Kline Pugh 
HiLAH Rounds 
Elizabeth West Viskniskki 
Anna Rose Williams 



Elizabeth Helen Winchester 



Mary Kenderdine Andrews 
Frances Eyster Dowdy 
Frances Elizabeth Fogg 
Gertrude Mary Jolls 
Grace Ellis McHenry 



Rebecca Kirk Blackburn 

Roberta Boak 

Marion Hannah Collins 



Juniors 



Sophomores 



Marian Baldwin Pratt 
Frances Walker Ramsey 
Florence Garrett Sellers 
Ruth Shellman 
Ann Entwisle Thompson 



Anne Carolyn Forstner 
Anne Sweeney Lefever 
Cora Elizabeth Palmenberg 



Margaret Brosius Walton 



Freshmen 



Dorothy Agnes Ackart 
Jean T. Fahringer 
Sally Fisher 
Marion W. Geare 
Helen Rebecca Hadley 



Marion Hamming 
Georgena Frances Keith 
Mary Ann Ogden 
Margaret D. Read 
Mildred L. Underwood 



ImALCYON 






Hundred and Se 




i^ALCYO^ 




Delta Gamma 



Founded 1873 



ALPHA BETA CHAPTER 



Established 1911 



ACTIVE CHAPTER 



Marjorie Fish 
Rhoda Esther Howard 
Virginia Ann Melick 
Katherine Reed 



Seniors 



Alberta Emilie Sauter 
Helen Dukes Scott 
Harriet Shepard Townsend 
Christine Myers Yoder 



Edna Gertrude Beach 
Julie VanderVeer Chapman 
Esther Cathryne Felter 
Gertrude Gilmore 



Juniors 



Anna Ruth Herrman 
Charlotte Susan Salmon 
Ruey May Sieger 
Elizabeth VanBrakle 



Margaret Boughton Williams 



Mary Anderson 
Marion Bonner 
Linda Ann Buffington 



Sofhomores 

Mary Elizabeth George 
Jane Perry Griest 
Dorothy Shoemaker 
Wanda May Veasey 



Ruth Blackburn Cleaver 



Fresh 



Virginia Barnes Stratton 



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Chi Omega 



GAMMA ALPHA CHAPTER 



Fomided 1895 



Established 1919 



Cecile Amedee Brochereux 
Carolyn Cook Buckwell 
Helen Frances Fletcher 



ACTIVE CHAPTER 



Seniors 



Louise Maxine Parkhurst 
Katharine Josephine Snyder 
Anne Jeanette Stetzer 



Helen Evelyn Zendt 



Josephine Scull Bornet 
Gertrude Hamilton Bowers 
Alice Gertrude Burling 
Olive Virginia Deane 
Martha Gibbons 



Emlyn Magill Hodge 
Elizabeth Bender Moffitt 
Edna Marie Rattey 
Mary Louise Robison 
Elizabeth Lippincott Vaughan 



Linda Alice Chandler 



Sophomores 

Helen Caroline Robison 
Agnes Louise Russell 



Freshman 

Anna Elizabeth Bennett 

Helen Pauline Calhoun 

Nancy Deane 

Dorothy Elizabeth Carolyn Ditter 

Frances Elisabeth Eaton 



Virginia Burrough Fell 
Catherine Marguerite Foster 
Marian Smedley Reynolds 
Josephine Maria Tremain 
Elizabeth Hickcox Yard 




e Hundred and Se 




^HALCYON 



Phi Mu 



Founded 1852 



BETA EPSILON CHAPTER 
ACTR'E CHAPTER 



EstabUshed 1919 



Rebecca Mary Hathaway 
Alice Mowry Jenkinson 
Frances Dorothy McCafferty 



Se?i!orj 



Ruth Marion Service 
Esther Mary Thomson 
Natalie Elsa Tonn 



Margaret Wirtz 



J« 



Isabelle May Bennett 
Margaret Louise DeLaney 
Alice Spencer Jemison 
Ora Katherine Lewis 



Dalny Elma Doughman 
Mary Elizabeth Hilles 



Sophomores 



Margaret Emma Mackey 
Jeannette Regena Poore 
Nell Anderson Rubins 
Anna Elizabeth Willis 



Helen \ ilona Larzelere 

Martha Jeannette Stauffer 



Theodora Gladys Abbott 
Betty Loynd Bamberger 
Elizabeth Keiser Harbold 
Helen Lanius Harry 



Freshmen 



Yuri Alberta Kawakami 
Lois Day Larzelere 
Margaret Elizabeth Spencer 
Selina Elizabeth Turner 



Dorothy Frances Wolf 



Page One Hundred and Seienty-six 



mA.LCYON 



The Wharton Club 

THE Wharton Club, although a comparatively young organization here 
at Swarthmore, exists for a very definite and noble purpose. It affords 
an opportunitv for everv man not affiliated with a fraternity to develop con- 
genial friendships which may be life-long. It has opened a new channel of 
thought in giving the undergraduates a chance to discuss college problems, 
and has encouraged its members to participate in athletics and other outside 
activities here in college. It engenders in all its members love and due 
respect for old Alma Mater. To be sure one of its greatest accomplishments 
is the entertaining of non-fraternitv alumni who visit Swarthmore. 

The Torch is the emblem of the Club, but only those members who 
have performed real services to the organization and who have obtained a 
certain scholastic standing are qualified to wear the emblem. Pins are 
bestowed upon the potential members who show interest in the organization. 

Wearers of the Pin and Torch 



John Underwood Ayres, '27 
Philip Conklin Blackburn, '29 
Meyer Cohen, Jr., '29 
Anthony Mead Fairbanks, '28 
Edmund Usina Fairbanks, '27 
Charles Lawrence Haines, '28 
William Scott Hall, '27 
Lawrence Alexander Hunt, '28 



William Edwin Lednum, '29 
Ed'wIn Lewis Palmer, Jr., '27 
Henry Bowman Seaman, '29 
Daniel Fox Smith, '29 
Timothy Edward Smith, '27 
Theodore Scott Suckow, '27 
William Preston Tollinger, '27 
Frank Huber Waltz, '27 



Page One Hundred and Seventy-eight 



^ALCYON 



Phi Beta Kapp 



a 



OFFICERS 

Presidait Hugh F. Denworth, '16 

Vice-President Roland J. Kent, '95 

Secretary-Treasurer Hilda A. Lang, '17 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



John Russell Hayes, '88 
Abby Mary Hall Roberts, '90 
Mary Wolverton Green, '92 



Helen Smith Brinton, 
Elizabeth Frorer, '19 
Drew Pearson, '19 



'95 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Frank Aydelotte (Indiana University Chapter) 

Lydia Baer (Oberlin College Chapter) 

Charles R. Bagley (Duke College Chapter) 

Frank C. Baxter (University of Pennsylvania Chapter) 

Brand Blanshard (University of Michigan Chapter) 

Frances B. Blanshard (Smith College Chapter) 

Ethel Hampson Brewster (Swarthmore College Chapter) 

Isabelle Bronk (Swarthmore College Chapter) 

Robert Clarkson Brooks (Indiana University Chapter) 

Harold Clarke Goddard (Amherst College Chapter) 

John Russell Hayes (Swarthmore College Chapter) 

Jesse Herman Holmes (Nebraska University Chapter) 

William Isaac Hull (Swarthmore College Chapter) 

Mac Edward Leach (University of Illinois Chapter) 

Frederic J. Manning (Yale University Chapter) 

Henrietta Josephine Meeteer (Indiana University Chapter) 

John Anthony Miller (Indiana University Chapter) 

Clara Price Newport (Swarthmore College Chapter) 

Richard M. Perdew (Swarthmore College Chapter) 

Will Carson Ryan, Jr. (Harvard University Chapter) 

Raymond Walters (Lehigh University Chapter) 

Emma T. R. Williams (Swarthmore College Chapter) 

HONORARY MEMBERS 
Joseph Swain Franklin Spencer Edmonds 




Audrey Shaw Bond 
Lucille Jeannette Buchanan 
George B. Clothier 
Elizabeth Paxson Colket 



Sigma Xi 



Founded at Cornell University in 1886 

The purpose of Sigma Xi is the fostering of original investigation and research in science, 
and the society offers to the student encouragement and inspiration during the years of prepar- 
ation by the associate membership. When unusual talent for independent thinking has been 
demonstrated by the student he will be taken into full membership. 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 



Gellert Alleman 

Isaac L. Battin (Associate) 

Francis H. Case 

Henry J. M. Creighton 

Errol Weber Doebler 

Weston Earle Fuller 

Lewis Fussell 

George Arthur Hoadley 

Edward H. Lange 



Ross Walter Marriot 
Dean B. McLaughlin 
John Anthony Miller 
Samuel Copeland Palmer 
John Himes Pitman 
Andrew Simpson 
Charles G. Thatcher 
Spencer Trotter 
Winthrop Robins Wright 



James Wright Chapman, '27 
Edmund Usina Fairbanks, '27 
Dorothea Agatha Kern, '27 
MiNTER Holmes Norton, '27 



UNDERGRADUATE ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 

Ayres Cromwell Seaman, '27 
Walter Oswald Simon, '27 
Valeska Urdahl, '27 
Norman Henry Winde, '27 



Charles Edwin Rickards, '27 



Johanna Gesina Zuydhoek, '27 



Sigma Tau 



Founded at the University of Nebraska, February 14, 1904 

Majors in Engineering who have displayed marked ability in scholarship are eligible 

after their Sophomore year. 

FACULTY MEMBERS 

Lewis Fussell, '02 Weston E. Fuller 

Charles G. Thatcher, '12 Errol W. Doebler 

Andrew Sim.-scn, '19 Howard M. Jenkins, '20 

El ward Lange 

UNDERGRADUATE MEMBERS 

Robert B. Clothier, '27 Robert L. Lindahl, '27 

Norman H. Winde, '27 

JAMES W. Chapman, '27 Robert W. Lafore, '27 

Ayres C. Seaman, '27 



Page One Hundred and Eighty-one 



'HALCYON 



Delta Sigma Rho 



"An organization to encourage effective and sincere public speaking." Students who 
have represented the college in an Inter-collegiate Debate or Oratorical Contest, and who 
have shown active interest in forensic affairs for three years are eligible for membership at 
the end of their Junior year. 

President Albert Sidney Johnson, Jr. 

Vice-President Robert Fetter Lee 

Secretary-Treasurer Gertrude Whetzel 



George Andrews Hay, '28 
Albert Sidney Johnson, Jr., '27 
Robert Fetter Lee, '27 
Alexander MacDougall, '28 



Marion E. Palmenberg, '27 
RuEY May Sieger, '28 
Edna Shoemaker, '28 
Gertrude Whetzel, '27 



Omicron Omega 



The purpose of this honorary fraternity is to increase interest in the Musical Clubs and 
to attract the best material in College to try out each year; to improve the quality of the 
clubs; to create a feeling of fellowship growing out of the contact of the members; and to 
provide a reward for work on behalf of the clubs. 

Any member who has served for two years and shown the proper qualifications and 
effort is eligible for election. 



Ellwood R. Burdsall, '27 
Charles Frazer Hadley, Jr., '28 
Friend D. Hunter, '27 
Everett Underbill Irish, '28 
Paul M. Kistler, '27 



Robert F. Lee, '27 
Edward Carey McFeely, '28 
James Russel Miller, '28 
Samuel R. M. Reynolds, '27 
Walter S. Studdiford, '27 




I^ALCYO^ 



Pi Delta Epsilon 

Founded by Syracuse University in 1909 

Students who have rendered distinguished service on college publications over a period 
of two years are eligible for Membership. 



FACULTY MEMBER* 
Raymond Walters 



UNDERGRADUATE MEMBERS 



Robert B. Clothier, '27 
Friend D. Hunter, '27 
Edward C. Jenkins, '27 
George W. McKeag, '27 
Girard B. Ruddick, '27 
Harold Silver Berry, '28 



Louis Ketterlinus Clothier, '28 
James Hamilton Colket, '28 
Theodore Henry Fetter, '28 
Everett Underhill Irish, '28 
James Russell Miller, '28 
Malcolm Bruce Petrikin, '28 



♦Honorary 



Newlin Smith, '28 



Delta Iota Delta 

Founded at Swarthmore College 1926 

HONORARY JOURNALISTIC SOCIETY FOR WOMEN 

Frances McCafferty, '27 
Elizabeth Miller, '27 
Sarah Pratt, '27 
Katharine Snyder, '27 




Hundred and 




TmALCYOlSi 



\ 



Mortar Board 



Founded February 20, 19 IS 



The Honorary Socictv for Senior women whose purpose is the furthering of students' 
responsibility toward the best interests of the college. The members are chosen for distinction 
in leadership, scholarship and service to Swarthmore. 



Alice Jenkinson Gertrude Price 

Katherine Snyder Margaret Jameson 

Frances McCafperty 



HALCYON 




Kw^ink 



Arthur Gorham Baker 
Harold Silver Berry 
Ellis Graham Bishop 
James Hamilton Colket, Jr. 
Richard Lippincott 



Charles Edmund Mears 
Thomas Moore, Jr. 
Theodore Smithers 
Charles Edward Tilton 
Theodore Widing 




^mALCYO^ 



^^1: 

w 




Book and Key Senior Society 



Parker Burdette Lewis Samuel Copeland Palmer, Jr. 

George Wilson McKeag Pierce Leon Richards 

Richard Harding McFeely Girard Bliss Ruddick 

Norman Henry Winde 



HALCYON 



The Swarthmore Phoenix 




G" 



connected with it. 



REAT changes have taken place during the past 
year in the field of "Phcenix work" although the 
form and content of the paper have remained much 
what they were when the present staff took charge. 
This is because it was felt that there was much more 
room for improvement in the mechanics of handling the 
paper than in its editorial and business policies. 

The chief purpose of the present administration 
has been to make the work more instructive, and 
consequently more interesting for the underclassmen 
To this end responsibility, which heretofore rested 
on the shoulders of one man, the editor, has been distributed, with the 
result of a few unnecessary technical errors, balanced off on the other 
hand by a great many advantages. The editor's senior year has been marked 
by a much less amount of drudgery, and the work of the juniors and even 
the sophomores has been lightened by adding to it a touch of the executive 
side of the publication. The practical advantages of the new system have 
been remarkable, and a marked increase in the interest of the candidates in 
the paper for itself rather than as an activity in the abstract has been manifest. 
As for the actual work in "putting out" an issue of the Phoenix, the 
time required has been lessened materially through the regular use of a 
"dummy." Thus much that was objectionable about the work, such as 
late hours on weekday nights and entire days spent in Chester, has been 
eliminated. A gratifying improvement in the grades of those who devote 
the most time to Phoenix work has given ample proof of the value of this 
step. Likewise the atmosphere in the office has undergone a change, which 
may be due in part to the new fixtures which have been obtained, but on the 
whole could be better accounted for by a change in the attitude of the scribes 
to their work. Where formerly a grim and hurried 
air characterized the office on "busy" nights, there 
is now an air of good-fellowship and co-operation 
which, far from decreasing the efficiency of the staff, 
has instead added to it considerably. 

From the reader's point of view the best indication 
of the state of the paper at present is, perhaps, to be 
found in the number of urgent letters and phone calls 
which come in whenever the post office department 
has failed to deliver it on time. 




ij^AhCYO^ 




The Sw^arthmore Phoenix Staff 



Editor-in-Chief 

Business Manager .... 

Associate Editors 

Neivs Editors 

Sporting Editor . ... . . 

Feature Editor 

Intercollegiate Editor . . . 
Alumni Editor 

Assistant Editors .... 

Circulation Manager ... 
Assistant Business Managers 
Chairman Phoenix Board 



GiRARD B. RuDDICK, '27 

Robert B. Clothier, '27 
Friend D. Hunter, '27 
Sarah D. Pratt, '27 
Edward C. Jenkins, '27 
Mary J. Hornaday, '27 
Paul M. Kistler, '27 
Lydia p. Turner, '27 
May G. Brown, '27 
Caroline A. Lukens, '98 
James Chapman, '27 
Ruth Longacre, '27 
Marcia Perry, '27 
Elizabeth Miller, '27 
Harold S. Berry, '28 
James H. Colket, '28 
S. Copeland Palmer, Jr., 



'27 



LOCAL EDITORS 

Everett U. Irish, '28 Katharine E. Rittenhouse, '28 

Diane Follwell, '28 Charlotte S. Salmon, '28 

Elizabeth B. Moffitt, '28 Newlin R. Smith, '28 

Mary Thomson Sullivan, '28 



^^^lcyon" 




B' 



The 19x8 Halcyon 

(UiLDiNG a year-book is indeed one of the most 
typical and delightful of college activities. It is 
like building a college career. Here we have the same 
wealth of opportunity, the same necessity for selection, 
the same spirit of helpfulness and co-operation, that 
confront each undergraduate. It brings alike the tedium 
^^ -^ and the novelty, the discouragement and the triumphs, 

ll^^k wlL^ ^^'^^ work and the play that make up the life of a college. 

^^^^ *lBB|||k. Moreover, the completed book must portray accurately, 
EDITOR and fondly, that life as it appears to the student body. 

It must be, to Swarthmore, a Halcyon; not a college annual. 

Clearly, the changes made by each succeeding Halcyon staff cannot 
be far-reaching. Many interests must be included in every book; others 
must be omitted. The task of compilation, therefore, resolves itself into a 
reproportioning of the contents and a vigilance toward the improvement of 
detail. In this, the forty-third Halcyon, we have attempted to give prom- 
inence to those features of Swarthmore which are most worthy of respect and 
endurance, and to subordinate or omit the more frivolous elements. Perhaps 
we may be forgiven if a slight prejudice appears for our own class and class- 
mates. 

Further, we have made definite, if not striking, improvements in the 
workmanship of the book. A superior binding, better stock, and the utmost 
in photographic, engraving, and printing excellence have contributed. 

In this, our autobiography for the year 1927, the staff 
has endeavored to catch the spirit that is Swarthmore. 
If we have failed, let our error be attributed to the en- 
thusiasm and near-sightedness of the undergraduate mem- 
bers, rather than to any misconception or small intent. 
Yet, as the book proceeds to its final court of appeal, we 
have the utmost confidence in our effort. It is an inter- 
esting and encouraging fact that the 1928 Halcyon has 
already been selected as the finest edition yet published. 
The board of judges appears on the opposite page. a. 




BUSINESS MANAGER 




The Halcyon Staff 

Editor-iH-Chief Ellis G. Bishop 

Bus mess Manager Malcolm B. Petrikin 

. [Grace E. McHenry 

Asststants JL^^^^ j. Clothier 

. . ^,. (Anne H. Phillips 

Assoaate Editors (vincent G. Bush 

Junior Editors JElisabeth A. Jenkins 

\ViNCENT G. Bush 

Assistant , Ruey M. Sieger 

r- T- I- (Mary T. Sullivan 

teature hditors <» T-^AT■^^ 

^Alexander D. MacDougal 

, ,, . T,,. [Gertrude M. Tolls 

Athletic Editors < t- u t -c 

[IhOMAS H. L. fOSTER 

Assistant Mary M. Livezy 

Art Editor Anne Kennedy 

Assistatit Mary Wright 

„, ^, . -rj- [MyRA ConOVER 

rbotovralibic Editors < -r cm t 

* ^ (Iheodore h. NiCKLES, Jr. 

Assistant William C. McCook 



J^alcyon' 



The Portfolio 




t: 



iHE Portfolio is a Literary Quarterly published by the 
students of Swarthmore College. The need for such 
a publication was manifested two years ago by a group 
of enthusiasts who believed that literary talent existed 
among the undergraduates here at college. All former 
attempts at publication had proved unsuccessful, but 
this energetic group saw "land ahead" and created 
enough interest among the students to elect a staff. 
Parents and friends of the college gave liberally, thus 
providing a financial backing for the Quarterly. 
Since then however, a strictly independent policy has been pursued and 
the paper is at the present time, absolutely self-supporting. To be sure the 
Portfolio has received many criticisms of every conceivable nature, but the 
staff has acted most democratically in all respects, profiting by constructive 
criticisms and strengthening itself against destructive ones. 

Last year it was deemed advisable to obtain an office for this magazine, 
but so far none has been secured. The meetings of the 
staff are set aside for thorough discussion groups, and a 
suitable place is all to be desired. 

The Portfolio has a real place here at Swarthmore. 
It is an enterprize which can become a success only 
through the help and support of every student. Those 
who contribute to the columns feel they have an indi- 
vidual responsibility of producing something of a real 
literary value, while those who subscribe add the finish- 
ing touches of real appreciation and good faith. 




BUSINESS M.\N.\GER 



f^AJLCYO^ 




The Portfolio Staff 

Editor-in-Chief Theodore H. Fetter, '28 

Business Manager Ann E. Thompson, '28 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



Ellis G. Bishop, '28 
Diane A. Follwell, '28 
Margaret Worth, '29 



Bertha B. Hull, '29 
EvERisTO M. Murray, '29 
Marian M. Hall, '29, Art Editor 



BUSINESS BOARD 

Caroline B. Lippincott, '28 Helen Larzelere, '29 

Parker King, '29 



JmALCYON 





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Young Women's Christian Association 

Organised February, 1911 

President Katharine Josephine Snyder, '27 

Vice-President Marion Elsa Palmenberg, '27 

Secretary Linda Alice Chandler, '29 

Treasurer Marion Pratt, '28 

Under-Graduate Representative Margaret Somerville, '28 

CABINET 

Chairman Religious Committee Marion Elsa Palmenberg, '27 

Chairman Social Committee Ruth Elizabeth Cornell, '27 

Chairman Publicity Committee Amelia Catherine Miller, '27 

Chairman Social Service Committee Marjorie Fish, '27 

Chairman Finance Committee Marion Pratt, '28 




Y. M. C A. and Y. W. C A. Conferences 



FOR the first time the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. conferences were held 
together at Eaglesmere. In the opening meeting Bruce Curry spoke on 
the Spirit of Comradeship between Men and Women which he hoped would 
be exemplified there. And in the days that followed, there was plenty of 
social interest as well as the more serious business of the conference. 

In the mornings there were many interesting talks. J. Stitt Wilson spoke 
on the Creative Personality, Juliette Derricotte on the Race Question, and 
there were discussions on Law Enforcement, War, Industry, and the Church. 
Perhaps one of the most enlightening of these events was a three-hour talk 
by Dr. Edith Swift on the Problems of Young People. These lectures were 
followed by separate groups for discussion. There were also interest groups 
which planned programs for carrying on "Y" work during the winter. 

The afternoons were occupied with tennis, bridge, canoeing, and long 
walks through the woods. One afternoon in the pouring rain the eds 
and co-eds of Swarthmore were disastrously defeated in a baseball game 
by the representatives from Penn State. However, with the aid of a Penn 
State star, the Swarthmore men overcame U. of P. by a score of 11 to 4. 

Two tea dances were given, as well as stunt night, when the Swarthmore 
group entertained with the old college classic of the automobile ride. This 
was followed by a dance for all those attending the conference. 

The Swarthmore representatives were, for the girls, Marian Palmenberg, 
Katherine Snyder, Lois Thompson of the class of '27, and Margaret Somer- 
ville and Gertrude Jolls of the class of '28. The boys were represented by 
Richard McFeely, Robert Clothier, Sidney Johnson, Walter Simon, Nolan 
Kaltreider, of the class of '27 and Edward McFeely of the class of '28. 



^ALCYO^ 





Musical Clubs 



Manager Ellwood R. Burdsall, '27 

Assistant Manager Thomas Moore, Jr., '28 

Librarian James H. Colket, Jr., '28 

GLEE CLUB 

Director Carl Nocka 

Accomfaniste Miss Catherine Emhardt, '29. 



First Tenors 

Everett U. Irish, '28 
James A. Miller, '28 
Samuel R. M. Reynolds, '27 
Thomas Sharples, '29 
Walter S. Studdiford, '27 
Stephen B. Tily, Jr., '27 
Donald Moyer, '28 
Thomas Nicely, '30 
Edward E. Boyer, '30 

Second Tenors 
Joseph D. Calhoun, '29 
Donald M. Hamilton, '29 
Nox M. Kehew, '30 
Albert D. Keller, '28 
Parker King, '29 
William E. Lednum, '29 
Kenneth A. Meiklejohn, '30 
Thomas Moore, Jr., '28 



First Basses 

Carl Arenander, '28 
J. Russell Bohn, '29 
Thomas Brown, '29 
James M. Chapman, '27 
John J. Coughlin, '28 
Horace F. Darlington, '29 
Ralph A. Gram, '29 
Edward C. McFeely, '28 
Harold Snyder, '29 

Seco7id Basses 
Ira W. Barnes, Jr. '29 
Ellwood R. Burdsall, '27 
Garrett E. Conklin, '30 
Robert G. Dawes, '29 
Morton A. Milne, '30 
Thomas K. Rathmell, '27 
William B. Wickersham, '29 
Howard J. Wood, '29 



BAND 
Director Paul M. Kistler, '27 



Saxophones 
Joseph D. Calhoun, '29 
Albert D. Keller, '28 
James M. Muir, '28 



Trumpets 

Robert L. Booth, '30 
Eldridge M. Hiller, '30 
John R. LeCron, '30 
Samuel R. M. Reynolds, '27 



Trombone 

Morton A. Milne, '30 

Clarinet 

Robert Silber, '28 

Horn 

Walter A. Muir, '29 



Cytnbals 

Robert G. Dawes, '29 

Drums 
James R. Miller, '28 

Flute 
C. Thorne Ricker, '29 




Page Two Hiind. 





t t t ,t 

i f i f 






I f . f f 



r ■ f I 



r f f f 




Musical Clubs 

WITH the close of another very successful season the Swarthmore Musical 
Clubs have mounted another rung in the ladder to perfection. The 
Band under the able direction of Paul M. Kistler, '27, made a very favorable 
impression upon every audience, adding strength and volume to the concerts. 

The opening concerts were held in January at the Chalfonte-Haddon Hall, 
Atlantic City, and on one occasion the Clubs broadcast over Station WPG 
This effort met with the highest approval of many alumni and friends of the 
College, for letters of appreciation and congratulations were received from all 
parts of the countrv. The next concert was presented to a very appreciative 
audience at West Chester and on February 21st the Clubs gave their most 
distinguished performance before a home audience. The harmony and blend- 
ing of voices were particularly commented upon in Swarthmore 's old favorite, 
"Lassie o' Mine." 

Probably the most outstanding event of the season was the Baltimore- 
Washington trip. The concert at Baltimore was presented to a fair audience 
in the Friends' School, the most popular numbers being those rendered by 
the male quartet which included Walter S. Studdiford, '27, Ralph A. Gram, 
'29, Thomas M. Brown, '29, Morton Milne, '30. 

The Washington concert was given at the Raleigh Hotel. The College 
Songs under the leadership of Manager Burdsall, '27, brought hearty 




applause from the audience and displayed the enthusiasm of every man. 

While in the Capitol City it was the pleasure of the Clubs to be photo- 
graphed with President Calvin Coolidge. The White House served as a 
fitting background for the picture which will be a pleasant souvenir of the 
Washington trip. 

On Friday, March 11th, the Clubs journeyed to Elizabeth, New Jersey, 
where a performance was given under the auspices of the American Business 
Men's Association. The following evening the final concert of the season 
took place in the Grand Ball Room of the Plaza Hotel, New York City. 
Every man co-operated whole-heartedly with Mr. Nocka and for that reason 
in particular the concert was first class. To be sure the profusely decorated 
room and lighting facilities added a touch of refinement. 

The Musical Clubs owe much credit to Mr. Carl Nocka, the Glee Club 
leader, and to Miss Catherine Emhardt, '29, accompaniste. Special credit is 
due Paul M. Kistler, '27, band leader, and Elwood R. Burdsall, '27, who 
worked consistently for a successful year. 



hi 



?*- -*,« •"<( 



■^'^ 



m 



Page Tiro Hundred and Tu> 



imALCYO^ 




The Little Theatre Club 

THE Little Theatre Club, an organization designed to promote interest in 
dramatics and to encourage the production of the best of modern plays 
with the pick of the talent in the undergraduate body, completed another 
successful year with the presentation of two plays, one as a Founders' Day 
feature, and the other the regular spring production. 

Membership in the club is based on worthy performance in major roles of 
at least two productions or ability in stage management and lighting effects. 

OFFICERS 

President Paul M. Kistler, '27 

Secretary .' Olive V. Deane, '28 

Treasurer Helen E. Zendt, '27 



*Philip M. Hicks, '05 
Albert E. Blackburn, Jr., 
Gertrude H. Bowers, '28 
Carolyn C. Buckwell, '27 
Olive V. Deane, '28 
Theodore H. Fetter, '28 
Elisabeth A. Jenkins, '28 
Paul M. Kistler, '27 
Virginia Melick, '27 

* Honorary 



MEMBERSHIP 



29 




Elizabeth Miller, '27 
James R. Miller, '28 
William Pickett, '27 
H. Caroline Robison, '2! 
Ruth Shellman, '28 
Horace H. Smith, '27 
Robert M. Stabler, '27 
George VanHart, '27 
Helen E. Zendt, '27 




"The Goose Hangs High" 

THE Little Theatre Club chose as its first play this year a delightful comedy 
by Lewis Beach, entitled "The Goose Hangs High." Under the direction 
of Edward T. Bartlett, '26, the student players, of whom several had proved 
their ability in former productions, gave an excellent performance. 

The play deals with modern home life, and reveals the college students' 
attitude toward the older generation. Bernard Ingals, portrayed by Paul 
Strong, '30, and his wife Eunice, Gertrude Jolls, '28, make untold sacrifices 
to send their children to college. At the opening of the first act the three 
children, Bradley, Theodore Fetter, '28, Lois, Caroline Robison, '29, and 
Hugh, George VanHart, '27, all come home for the Christmas vacation. 
They find that their father, who has sacrificed the work that he loves in 
order to give his children every advantage, has lost his position. After a 
realization of this has come to the college students, they aid their father in 
his political difficulties, and the curtain falls on a household whose problem 
of conflict between the two generations has been happily adjusted. 

Josephine Tremain, '30, took the part of Mrs. Bradley, grandmother of 
the young people. The part of Julia Murdock, the old aunt was taken by 
Virginia Melick, '27, and Willard Grant, '30, played the part of her son, 
Roland. Noel Berby, an old family friend, was played by Ralph Gram, '30. 
William Pickett, '27 was the councilman, Leo Day. The role of Dagmar 
Carroll, Hugh's fiancee, was taken by Dorothy Shoemaker, '29. Robert 
Stabler, '27, played the part of Elliott Kimberley, a politician and enemy of 
Bernard Ingals. 




7/halcyon 



One- Act Plays 

THIS year when Mr. Hicks let down the barrier of the prerequisite of Speech 
Training, battalions of students marched into his course in greater numbers 
than ever before. Correspondingly more coaches reported to direct the aspir- 
ing actors. As before, two competitive casts worked on the same play, and 
at a tryout at the end of several weeks practice, the better actors were chosen 
to present their interpretation at one of the triannual public performances of 
the One-Act Plays. 

Just before the spring vacation last year, three original One-Act Plavs, 
written bv Swarthmore students, were produced bv the members of the One- 
Act play course and members of the Little Theatre Club. Horace Smith, 
Betty Miller, Henry McAllister and Esther Thompson acted in "The Cross- 
roads," bv Edith Hull. Ross Fink directed it. "Mirage" was plaved by 
Gertrude Jolls, Alice Dickey, William Howard, and William C. Pickett under 
the direction of Florence Hoskinson, the author. This play, though perhaps 
not superior in technique, acted better than "The Crossroads." "Auntie 
Up" written bv Theodore Fetter, was directed bv Virginia Melick. Marietta 
Watson, Charles Mears, Thoburn Maxwell, Ruth Longacre, Donald Dudley 
and Leah Shreiner took the parts of college students, Carolyn Hearne the part 
of Aunt Jane, and Theodore Fetter the chauffeur. Approaching technical 
perfection, and offering some interesting and luminous philosophy on the 
younger and older generations, this play took the first Curtain Theatre Prize. 
Last Mav, the plav course presented a special three act play, George 
Bernard Shaw's "Candida" for the benefit of the Women's Student Building 
Fund. Robert Stabler, Esther Howard, Eugene Gedney, Robert E. Eiche, 
supported Polly Smith as "Candida" and Ted Fetter as the young hero poet. 
Polly Smith's acting did much to augment the play's success. 

At a scheduled performance of the One-Act Play course, on December 10, 
1926, four one-act plays were produced. "The Rector" by Rachel Crothers, 
with the scene laid in a small wintrv Pennsvlvanian town durine the 
"eighties," was directed by Helen D. Scott. It is a farce about narrow- 
minded, sentimental women who take a jealous, foolish delight in laying 
plans for the rector's future. The cast consisted of: Marion Harris, Albert 
J. Blackburn, Rebecca Hathaway, Julie Chapman, Sara Franklin, Elizabeth 
Jenkins and Diane E. Follwell. Julie Chapman distinguished herself in her 
vivid characterization of Miss Trimble. Next on the bill was "The Robberv" 

by Clare Kummer in which Betty Lou 
Thompson, Thomas Moore, Joseph D. 
Calhoun, Nell Rubens took part. This 
play is pure comedv mvsterv, and the 
character study of the father Mr. Upton 
was excellently portraved by Joseph 
Calhoun. William C. Pickett directed 
the production. "Op-o'-Me Thumb" bv 
Fenn and Pryce, a play laid in a London 
laundry, was cast by Sara Pratt, Esther 
White, Edna Shoemaker, Winifred 




T^ALCYO^ 




Rumble, Marian Hall, and Stephen B. 
Tily, under Esther Howard's and Frances 
McCafferty's direction. Marian Hall, 
who took the part of "Amanda" in- 
terpreted her part delightfully. Edna 
Shoemaker also made a good character 
study. The last play, George Ade's 
"The Mayor and the Manicure," which 
was directed by Robert M. Stabler, 
proved the most finished production of 
the evening. Ralph A. Gram as the 
Mavor and Sylvia Windle as the 
Manicure played excellently. Howard 
Morcimcr Drake and Jcancttc Poore supported them. 

The last play on the bill was "Double Demon" by A. B. Herbert. Here 
there is a jury consisting of ten jurywomen and one juryman. Alexander 
MacDougall took the part of the juryman. Maretta King was the forewoman. 
Helen Scott, Mary Passmore, Helen Zendt, Marian Foberg, Adelaide Israel, 
Harriet Townsend, Gertrude Whetzel, Catharine Carl, Ruth Ennes and 
Frances McCafferty played the jurywomen. 

On March 18, 1927, four more plays were presented in Collection Hall. 
Diane E. Follwell, Anna Rose Williams and Winifred Rumble, under Carolyn 
Hearne's direction, acted "For Distinguished Service." This play is about 
an attractive woman who proves herself conventional, by refusing to captivate 
another woman's husband. Esther Howard and Theodore Fetter directed 
"Everybody's Husband" by Gilbert Cannon. Betty Lou Thompson took the 
part of the girl. Kitty Rittenhouse, Esther Shallcross, Esther Felter and 
Marian Hall impersonated the spirit's motherly ancestors, and Theodore 
Fetter was everybody's husband. It is an enchanting sketch where, in spite 
of her dream, that everyone's husband is the same, the girl wakes on the 
morning of her wedding day believing her husband will be different. Marian 
Hall played the great-grandmother's part with the smoothness and under- 
standing of an accomplished actress. Betty Lou Thompson's interpretation 
was delightful. "The Land of Heart's Desire," is a typical Yeats creation, 
dealing with Irish superstition. A sensitive dreamy Irish girl pines away for 
an imaginary fairyland far from her harsh homefolk and lethargic husband. 
Sara Pratt, Jack Leypoldt, Thoburn Maxwell, Elisabeth Jenkins, Milton 
Atkinson and Caroline Robison acted under Gertrude Whetzel's coaching. 
Elisabeth Jenkins as the girl was excellent in her portrayal, of the Irish 
dreamer, and Caroline Robison improvised a dance and song as the whirling 
fairy. "The Dear Departed" by Stanley Houghton, is a farce saturated with 
ludicrous, ridiculous lines of a crude and poorly educated family. Frances 
Porter, Joseph Calhoun, and Mortimer Drake did their parts outstandingly 
well. James Miller, Jeanette Poore and Charlotte Salmon complete the cast. 
Helen Scott was the coach. 



HALCYON 



,; 

111 



Commencement Play 

THE class of 1926 delved into the fantastic for its commencement play 
which closed the Class Day exercises in the chilly twilight of early 
summer. The production was a "Barrie-like" delight, "Prunella" by Gran- 
ville Barker and A. E. Houseman, which took place amid the appropriate 
woodland charm of the Magill Outdoor Auditorium. Despite the cold and 
dampness of the June evening a certain warmth, prompted by the merit 
of the play, permeated the atmosphere of the amphitheater. It was meet 
that "Prunella" should have this outdoor setting which, coupled with an 
excellent cast, so well displayed the allegorical fantasy to the best advantage. 

Prunella, played with great understanding and feeling by Anna Maude 
Smith, is really the well-known heroine, Pierrette, who once bore the former 
name as the properly brought-up niece of three maiden aunts, Prim, Prude, 
Privacy, characterized as such persons should be by Ruth Lillian Ennis, 
Dorothy Dunn Bowers, and Mary Catelle Passmore. As the night follows 
the day, so Pierrot follows Pierrette. In this instance it was Robert Whit- 
more Graham, who, by a finished interpretation added this lover's part 
to his long list of meritorious dramatic portrayals. Then, there is Boy, 
one of the most charming and well acted parts, taken with convincing 
masculinity by Marretta Powell King. 

When Prunella is torn by a desire to follow Pierrot, Love, played by 
Florence Shock Kennedy, unto this time a statue, comes to life and urges 
the girl to go with her lover. Yet, to Pierrot there is another side in Scaramel, 
his darker character, portrayed by Donald Goodnow Dudley, always an 
actor well suited to such a role. The plot demands that Pierrot awake and 
finally realize his selfishness. When Prunella, now a beggar girl, falls asleep 
at the foot of the statue, to be soon found by the impetuous youth, there 
comes the dawning of the realization of true love. 

Other talented members of the class completed a cast as nearly perfect 
as could be desired for the presentation of this bit of fantasy, extremely 
charming though void of much substantial plot. Yet in its place there is an 
enchantment that carries the spectator into realms where the highly-developed 
imagination can play with the greatest ease. Particularly true was this in 
the Senior production, given adequate and intelligent direction by Allan 
Jocelyn, of the Hedgerow Theater, a capable coach whose work gave "Pru- 
nella" the finesse of professionalism. 

A play committee under the chairmanship of Arthur Haines Evans super- 
vised the practical work of the production. 



Page Two Hundred and Eight 



J^^xcYO^ 




DEBATE 





Men's Debate 

Manager A. Sidney Johnson, Jr., '27 

Assistant Manager Alexander D. MacDougall, '28 

Coach Everett L. Hunt 

INTERCOLLEGIATE DEBATERS 



Harold S. Berry, '28 
Joseph D. Calhoun, '29 
George A. Hay, '28 
A. Sidney Johnson, '27 
George H. Kain, '29 




Robert F. Lee, '27 
Alexander D. MacDougall, '28 
Joseph E. Pappano, '28 
Albion Ross, '28 
Horace H. Smith, '27 



MEN IN FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE DEBATE 



Joseph D. Calhoun, '29 
Richard M. Kain, '30 



William Poole, '30 
Albion Ross, '29 



Two Hundr, 



'HALCYON 



The Debate Season 

THE debate season is unique this year in that, as the book goes to press, 
three important meetings with Philadelphia societies remain on the 
schedule. All forensic activities are usually concluded when the first signs 
of spring appear. 

After an interesting underclass tilt, the intercollegiate season opened 
with two debates on February 18th. One was a dual contest with George 
Washington University. Two men travelled to Washington to argue the 
question of extraterritoriality, while three men debated before a Swarthmore 
audience. In both places split teams were used. The other was a straight 
team debate upon the Eighteenth Amendment with Girard College at the 
citv institution. 

The pertinent question of intervention in Latin America was the subject 
of the annual debate between Swarthmore and Duke University. 

An open forum debate with Western Reserve University followed. The 
phase of the prohibition question regarding suggested amendment was 
argued. 

THE SCHEDULE 

Swarthmore with George Washington University ^Extraterritoriality in China') 

Swarthmore, February 18, 1927. Decision by audience in favor of affirmative. QSplit 
teams) 

Swarthmore with George Washington University ^Extraterritoriality in China^ 

Washington, D. C, February 18, 1927. Decision by audience in favor of affirmative. 
QSplit teams) 

Swarthmore with Girard College (^Eighteenth Amendment) 

Philadelphia, Pa., February 18, 1927. Decision by audience in favor of negative, upheld 
by Girard. 

S\\'arthmore with Duke University' (Intervention in Latin America) 

Swarthmore, March 4, 1927. Decision by the audience in favor of affirmative. (Split 
teams) 

Swarthmore with Western Reserve University (Light Wines and Beer) 

Swarthmore, March 17, 1927. Decision by the audience in favor of affirmative. (Split 
teams) 



Two Hundred and Eleven 



Women's Debate 

Manager Marion Palmenberg 

Assistant Manager Elisabeth Jenkins 

Coach Everett L. Hunt 

INTERCOLLEGIATE DEBATE TEAM 
Marion Palmenberg, '27 Ruey May Sieger, '28 

Frances Fogg, '28 Mary Wright, '28 

Edna Shoemaker, '28 Frances Eton, '30 

FRESHMAN DEBATE TEAM 
Frances Eton, '30 
Mary Temple, '30 
Dorothy Wolf, '30 



Page Two Hundred and Tueli'e 




Women's Debate Season 

THE 1927 season, although not so full as last year's, proved to be as satis- 
factory. There were five debates in all, three of which took place away, 
and the other two at home. As usual, except in the debate with Juniata 
College, the open forum style, with audience decision, was used. 

The season's most interesting debate was held with Wesleyan University, 
who sent a team of men to Swarthmore to debate on the question of Co- 
education. This was the hrst time the women's team had debated a men's 
college. Ruey Sieger and Mary Wright upheld the affirmative side of the 
question successfully. In the debate with Juniata College, Marietta Watson 
and Frances Eaton supported the negative on the question of cancelling the 
Allied War Debts. In the next debate with the University of Pittsburgh, 
on the Introduction of the Practical into Liberal Colleges, the teams were 
split — Marion Palmenberg upholding the affirmative, and Frances Fogg the 
negative. The debate with Temple University also concerned the War 
Debts. The team consisted of Edna Shoemaker and Ruey Sieger. In the 
annual Freshmen debate with George School, Dorothy Wolf, Frances Eaton 
and Mary Temple represented the Swarthmore Freshmen. 



THE SCHEDULE 

Swarthmore with Wesleyan University (Co-educatioii) 

Decision in favor of the affirmative, upheld by Swarthmore. 

Swarthmore with Juniata College (War Debts) 

Decision in favor of the affirmative, upheld by Juniata College. 

Swarthmore with the University of Pittsburgh (Introduction of the Practical into Liberal 
Colleges) 
Decision in favor of the negative. (Split teams) 

Swarthmore with Temple University (War Debts) 

Decision in favor of the negative, upheld by Swarthmore. 

Swarthmore Freshmen with George School (War Debts) 

Decision in favor of the affirmative, upheld by George School. 




S^varthmore Forum 

Organized 1925 

THE Swarthmore Forum is the outgrowth of a combination of the Debate 
Board and the Polity Club, which, individually, were poorly supported. 
The aim of the new organization is to stimulate the thought and discussion 
of the problems of modern civilization, and to connect the students" edu- 
cation with these problems. The Forum co-operates with other organizations 
in college as much as possible in furthering this aim. 

Among the outstanding speakers of the year were; Kenneth Lindsav, 
Social Worker and Lecturer from London, who gave an impressive talk upon 
the significance of the recent British general strike; Dr. Harry W. Laidler, 
who gave a thorough account of the events which lead to our extremely 
tense relations with Mexico over their recent land laws and our interference 
in Nicaraugua. A practical result of the Nicarauguan and Mexican discussion 
was the petition which was circulated by the Forum and sent to President 
Coolidge. Paul C. Ming, executive secretary of the Chinese Christian Asso- 
ciation stimulated thought on our relations with the awakening races of the 
Far East. 

EXECUTHT BOARD 

President Horace H. Smith, '27 

Vice-President Erma P. Goldsmith, '27 

Secretary Alexander D. MacDougall, '28 

Women's Debate Manager Marion E. Palmenberg, '27 

Men's Debate Manager A. Sidney Johnson, Jr., '27 



jmALCYON^ 




English Club 

OFFICERS 

President Margaret S. Jameson, '27 

Secretary Virginia Melick, '27 

Treasurer Frances D. McCafferty, '27 

MEMBERS 

Margaret S. Jameson, '27 Nell A. Rubins, '28 

Virginia Melick, '27 Ruth Shellman, '28 

Frances D. McCafferty, '27 Sara-Chace Franklin, '29 

Esther C. Felter, '28 Elizabeth M. Ogden, '29 

Elizabeth B. Moffitt, '28 Margaret Worth, '29 



^ALCYO^ 




Le Cercle Francais 



OFFICERS 

President Cecile A. Brochereux, '27 

Secretary-Treasurer ■ Adelaide Israel, '27 



MEMBERS 

Ruth Kerwyn, '28 Mary Louise Robinson, '28 

Grace McHenry, '28 Marion Pratt, '28 

Ruth Purvis, '28 Lois Thompson, '27 

Nicholson Garrett, Jr., '27, Honorary 



J^ALCYON" 




Classical Club 

OFFICERS 

President Alice S. Jemison, '28 

Vice-President Mary Frances Langford, '28 

Secretary-Treasurer Elsie Battin, '28 



MEMBERS 



Cicely C. Browne, '27 

Elizabeth D. Hormann, '27 

Elsie Battin, '28 

Emma P. Engle, '28 

Alice S. Jemison, '28 

Mary Frances Langford, '28 

Roberta J. Boak, '29 



A. Roberta Norton, '29 
Alice C. Atkinson, '30 
Marion L. Colson, '30 
Dorothy E. Ditter, '30 
Cecilia A. Garrigues, '30 
Eloise Hettinger, '30 
Lois D. Larzelere, '30 



Dorothy F. Wolf, '30 




Tu'o Hundred and Eighteen 





Athletics 



Page Two Hundred and Nineteen 



^ALCYO^ 



Thomas G. Best 
A. Lincoln Castle 
W. Turner Clack 
H. Walton Coles 
John K. Degroot 
John W. Dutton 



Winners of the "S" 

FOOTBALL 
Pierce L. Richards, Captain 
George W. McKeag, Manager 
Raymond S. Garber 
H. Thomas Hallo well 
Edward F. Lang 
Horace McGuire 
Richard McFeely 
Wilbur M. McFeely 



Theodore Widing 



S. Copeland Palmer 
Malcolm B. Petrikin 
Charles E. Rickards 
Joseph J. Tomlin 
J. Paxton Unger 
Robert A. Ward 
Norman H. Winde 



BASKETBALL 



Charles E. Rickards, Manager 
Leroy G. Baum Pierce L. Richards 

Howard B. Cates Ralph W. Tipping 

John H. Lippincott, Jr. Norman H. Winde 

BASEBALL 
Carroll E. Ogden, Captain 
F. Maxwell Shuster, Manager 
C. Bert Adelman John H. Lippincott, Jr. 

Edward T. Bartlett Horace McGuire 

Leroy G. Baum John W. Neely 

Howard B. Cates Malcolm B. Petrikin 

Samuel G. Eckerd Pierce L. Richards 

Clifford E. Fix William H. Sill 

TRACK 
P. BuRDETTE Lewis, Captain 
Frederick L. Redefer, Manager 
Arthur G. Baker Roy J. Kersey 

Albert C. Cliff C. Thoburn Maxwell 

Russell E. Clift Minter H. Norton 

Louis K. Clothier Richard M. Perdew 

John W. Dutton Francis M. Rumble 

Edmund Q. Wilcox 

LACROSSE 
William F. Howard, Captain 
TowNLEY, Manager 

Richard H. McFeely 
William F. Ogden 



Frederick S 
Ellis G. Bishop 
Avery F. Blake 
Vincent G. Bush 
John K. Degroot 
Henry C. Ford 
Morgan C. Koehnline 
Edward F. Lang 



S. Copeland Palmer, Jr. 
Charles E. Rickards 
Horace Roberts, Jr. 
John H. Swope 
J. Paxton Unger 



Page Two Hundred and Twenty 



SmAXCYO^ 




The Varsity Club 

THE purpose of this club is "to hold the interest of Varsity Club alumni 
in Swarthmore athletics, to encourage students to go out more for athletic 
honors, to discourage athletes from breaking training, and to strive for high 
standards of sportsmanship in all Swarthmore athletics." 

Only Juniors and Seniors are eligible to active membership. Sophomore 
letter men are eligible to associate membership, while Freshmen may attend 
meetings after they have won a letter. Members of this club may be recog- 
nized bv the oblong garnet and white button worn on the coat lapel. Dia- 
grams of a football and a baseball field, a basketball floor, a track, and 
lacrosse sticks on the button serve to indicate the sport in which the letter 
was won. 

OFFICERS 1926-1927 

President Richard H. McFeely, '27 

Vice-President Edward F. Lang, '27 

Secretary C. Thoburn Maxwell, '28 

Treasurer Arthur G. Baker, '28 



Sw^arthmore College Athletic Association 

Organt'K_ed November 14, 1877 
Motto: "Metis sana hi cor fore sano." 

OFFICERS 1926-1927 

President Edward F. Lang, '27 

Vice-President Charles E. Rickards, '27 

Secretary Robert B. Clothier, '27 

Graduate Matiager Samuel C. Palmer, '93 

Assistant Graduate Manager Charles G. Thatcher, 11 

ATHLETIC COUNCIL 

President A. A Edward F. Lang, '27 

Secretary A. A Robert B. Clothier, '27 

Physical Director E. Leroy Mercer 

Graduate Manager Samuel C. Palmer, '95 

Football Captain Pierce L. Richards, '27 

Basketball Captain Robert A. Ward, '27 

Baseball Captain John H. Lippincott, Jr., '27 

Track Captain P. Burdette Lewis, '27 

Lacrosse Captain Richard H. McFeely, '27 

Soccer Captain John H. Lippincott, Jr., '27 

Sivimming Captain Jack Thompson, '27 

Tennis Captain Robert E. L. Johnson, '27 

Football Manager George W. McKeag, '27 

Basketball Manager ; Charles E. Rickards, '27 

Baseball Manager Ellwood R. Burdsall, '27 

Track Matiager Thomas K. Rathmell, '27 

Lacrosse Manager Samuel R. M. Reynolds, '27 

Soccer Manager Russell R. Harris, '27 

Sivimming Manager Robert L. Lindahl, '27 

Tennis Manager John B. Leypoldt, '27 

Assistant Football Manager Ellis G. Bishop, '28 

Assistant Basketball Manager , Theodore Smithers, '28 

Assistant Baseball Manager James H. Colket, Jr., '28 

Assistant Track Manager Harold S. Berry, '28 

Assistant Lacrosse Manager Theodore Widing, '28 

Cheer Leader Stephen B. Tily, Jr., '27 

Assistant Cheer Leader James R. Miller, '28 

Assistant Cheer Leader Charles F. Hadley, Jr., '28 

swarthmore college athletic committee 

Representing the Alumni Charles C. Miller 

Charles A. Eberle 

Representing the Faculty • \^ -, \ \i\ 

Samuel C. Palmer 
Representing the Athletic Association , Edward F. Lang 



I5[halcyon 




9x6 Football 



Capain . . 
Head Coach 



Assistant Coaches 
Manager . . . 



Pierce L. Richards 
E. LeRoy Mercer 

Frank Fitts 
Roy Delaplaine 

George W. McKeag 



THE TEAM 



Edward F. Lang 
Thomas G. Best 
Turner Clack 
Pierce L. Richards 
Robert A. Ward 
Joseph J. Tomlin 
H. Walton Coles 
A. Lincoln Castle 
Theodore Widing 
John K. DeGroot 



Raymond S. Garber 
S. Copeland Palmer 
Malcolm B. Petrikin 
Charles E. Rickards 
Richard H. McFeely 
Norman H. Winde 
H. Thomas Hallowell 
Wilbur M. McFeely 
J. Paxton Unger 
John W. Dutton 



Horace McGuire 




ivo Hundred and Tw 






RICHARDS, CAPTAIN 



9x6 Football Review 

AFTER a rather disappointing start, Swarthmore's 1926 
l\. football team enjoyed one of the most successful 
seasons in recent vears. Encountering an exceptionally 
hard schedule, the team won five games of eight played, 
defeating all the teams of its own class which were met. 
Susquehanna, Ursinus, Delaware, Franklin and Marshall, 
and Rutgers were beaten and only such powerful teams as 
Pennsylvania, Princeton and Western Maryland were able 
to overcome the Garnet. 

When the call for candidates was issued the outlook 
for the season was anything but promising. Eleven letter- 
men from the 1925 team, including such stars as Wilcox, 
Korn, Seymour, and Evans had graduated. Practically the 
whole backfield of the previous year was gone and the first problem facing 
Coach Mercer was to build up a new combination of ball carriers. Few 
followers of the Garnet were optimistic enough to predict five victories in 
one of the most difficult schedules ever attempted by a small college team. 

The season opened with Susquehanna at Selinsgrove. The extremely bad 
weather of the two preceding weeks had permitted only two scrimmages 
and, thus handicapped from lack of practice, the team went up against 
their farther-advanced opponents. Although Swarthmore finally won out 
by a score of 13-7, the team showed no great ability but displayed an abun- 
dance of fighting spirit. The game was won largely through the individual 
efforts of Captain Richards who made the first score of the season by scooping 
up a Susquehanna fumble in the first period and running for a touchdown. 
This was the only score during the first 
half. Susquehanna came back in the 
second half determined to win, and, on 
a series of passes, scored a touchdown, 
tying the score. The remainder of the 
game was bitterly fought. In the last 
period Swarthmore carried the ball to 
the four yard line where a fumble lost 
an opportunity for a touchdown. Fi- 
nally, with only a few minutes of play 
remaining, and the Garnet in possession 
of the ball at midfield, Garber shot a 
long forward pass to Coles who crossed 





MERCER, COACH 





m 



the goal-line with the winning points. In this game the 
inexperience of the new backfield was very evident, but 
the line functioned in great style. 

The following Saturday, the Little Quakers met the 
great team of the Big Quakers, which had been crushing its 
opponents under huge scores. In this game Penn was 
victorious by the largest score made by any team against 
Swarthmore in years. However, the game was not nearly 
so one-sided as the score would seem to indicate. For 
three periods, the Garnet held Penn on fairly even terms 
and it was not until the last fifteen minutes of play that 
the Red and Blue was able to gain freely. By this time the 
""""■^ Swarthmore players were exhausted and the constant 

stream of excellent reserves which Penn was able to throw into the game 
proved the deciding factor. In the first half Penn scored two touchdowns 
and a field goal. The Garnet came back strong in the second half and threw 
a scare into the Penn ranks by advancing the ball to the five yard line. It 
seemed likely that Swarthmore would keep up her tradition for scoring on 
Penn. The fifty thousand spectators were on their feet at the prospect of 
another of those great rallies for which Swarthmore is famous at Franklin 
Field. But the university team took the ball on downs and the threat was 
over. Richards again covered himself with glory by his great defensive 
play, and astonished Penn supporters by outplaying Butler, their Ail- 
American center. Pete was all over the field, making impossible tackles and 
backing up the line in fine style. 

A week later the Western Maryland team brought its ex-Quantico Marines 
to Swarthmore for the first home game, but Swarthmore was no match for 
its older and more experienced opponents. However, a shutout was averted 
when Palmer caught a forward pass in 
the last period and raced across the 
goal-line. This game was a costly one 
for the Garnet on account of injuries. 

A badly crippled eleven faced Ur- 
sinus the following week. Captain 
Richards, R. McFeely, Winde, Max- 
well, DeGroot, McGuire, Garber, and 
Petrikin were all on the sidelines be- 
cause of injuries. But the substitutes 
performed in an excellent manner and 
completely outplayed their Collegeville 
rivals, although held to a 6-3 victory. 





TiALCYO^ 




The lone touchdown was made on an 
end run by Dutton in the second 
quarter, after a forward pass had placed 
the ball on the 3 yard line. Only the 
brilliant playing of the Ursinus quarter- 
back, Willard Moyer, kept down the 
score. Swarthmore made only one 
substitution during the game, W. 
McFeely, taking the place of Richards 
at center. Tomlin, Castle, Coles, and 
Dutton played bang-up football against 
the "Bears." 

DEGRooT Next came the annual struggle with "''^ 

Princeton. The "Tigers," who later trimmed Harvard and Yale, shut out 
the Garnet for the first time since the two teams have met. Nevertheless, 
Swarthmore fought hard and outplayed Princeton in the last period, several 
times coming very near scoring. This proved to be Swarthmore's last defeat 
of the season. 

Delaware University was the opponent in the final home game, and the 
Southerners were so confident of victory that several hundred students and a 
band accompanied the team to Swarthmore field. But the Garnet eleven 
had a good day and ran wild through the Newark team, scoring seven 
touchdowns, four points after touchdown, and a safety for a total of forty- 
seven points. DeGroot and Dutton starred for Swarthmore, each making 
two touchdowns. The whole team worked like a machine and gained almost 
at will. Delaware made its only score in the last few minutes of play when 
Loveland intercepted a pass and sprinted eighty-five yards for a touchdown. 
The next Saturday, Mercer took his charges to Lancaster, where for the 
first time in several years, Franklin and Marshall was 
beaten, in a rather loosely played game. The Blue and 
White held the Garnet on even terms in the first half, no 
scoring being done on either side. In the second half 
Richards put Swarthmore ahead with a twenty-five yard 
field goal and, later in the game. Castle and Barnes led a 
drive toward the F. and M. goal line, which ended when 
Castle took the ball across. The latter's fine punting 
featured the second half of the game. 

The final contest of the season took place at New 
Brunswick with Rutgers. The teams were very evenly 
matched, and, in a game replete with thrills and lost 
opportunities for scoring, Swarthmore was triumphant 




Page 



TlALCYON 




by a 13-0 score. The initial touchdown came in the first 
period, when McGuire made a beautiful run after catching 
a pass from Castle. Rutgers then rallied and Swarthmore 
was on the defensive for the remainder of the first half. 
The second half was hard-fought. Both teams resorted 
to passing without much success. Swarthmore being 
handicapped in this department by the absence of Garber. 
The Garnet rooters were alarmed when Richards, who 
had been playing brilliantly, was forced to leave the game 
with a broken nose. W. McFeely again came through in 
a pinch and substituted at center in a very capable manner. 
In the last quarter, Castle intercepted a Rutgers pass, on 
the next play carried the ball off tackle, and behind perfect 

interference raced seventy-seven yards for the final touch- 
down of the year. 

Coach Mercer deserves great credit for the successful 
season, especially for his good work in molding a strong 
backfield out of inexperienced material. Castle and 
DeGroot were the only backs who had won letters in 
1925. Castle played so well all season that he was elected 
captain of the team for 1927. The fine punting and passing 
of Garber, the sophomore full back, gave great promise 
for the future. Dutton, Widing, Unger, and McGuire also 
did meritorious work behind the line. 

Captain Richards was by far the most outstanding 
linesman. His tackling was the feature of the season and 
led to his being recommended by several leading critics for 
All-American honors. He was an inspiring and popular captain and his 
fighting personality played a great part in the success of 
the team. He has starred on the Swarthmore elevens of 
the last four seasons. Bill McFeely, who acted as under- 
studv to Richards, performed very ably and much is 
expected of him next season. 

Ward, Clack, Winde, and Hallowell played well at 
guard, as did Best, Tomlin, R. McFeely, and Lindahl at 
tackle. The team suffered a great loss when Dick McFeely 
was injured in mid-season and was unable to play in the 
final games. 

At end the most consistent players were Coles, 
Rickards, Palmer, Lang, and Petrikin. The greatest draw- 
back of the ends was lack of weight. 




11 




RICKARES 



^HALCYO^ 



i'^ryic, 



TOMLIN W. MCFEELY MC GUIRE COLES 

Although nearly the whole line will graduate this year, the backtield will 
remain practically intact for the 1927 season, and, with the aid of several 
promising substitutes and freshmen, Swarthmore should have another win- 
ning team next year. 

RESULTS OF THE SCHEDULE 

Swarthmore Opponents 

October 4. Susquehanna at Selinsgrove 13 '7 

October 11. U. of P. at Philadelphia 44 

October 18. Western Maryland at Swarthmore 7 34 

October 25. Ursinus at Swarthmore 6 3 

November 1. Princeton at Princeton 27 

November 8. Delaware at Swarthmore 47 7 

November 15. Franklin and Marshall at Lancaster 9 

November 22. Rutgers at New Brunswick 13 

Totals 95 122 



J^M 



r**i3r>«* 



s*"! 



H.^Ll.OWbLL 



Page Two Hundred and Thirty 



TiALCYONAt 




#«N 




BASKETBALL 



HALCYON 




192.7 Basketball 

Captain Robert A. Ward 

Coach Frank Fitts 

Manager Charles E. Rickards 

THE TEAM 

Pierce L. Richards Norman H. Winde 

LeRoy G. Baum John H. Lippincott, Jr. 

Howard B. Gates Ralph W. Tipping 




imALCYO^ 



19x7 Basketball Revievs^ 

A SEASON of thrills." That describes the 1927 basketball season at Swarth- 
more College. Nearly every game was closely contested and five games 
were decided by a margin of three points or less. 

As a whole, the season may be considered unusually successful. Winning 
seven games out of thirteen is not a bad record, taking into account the 
extreme difficulty of the schedule. The team started off in line style by 
winning the first four games. Ursinus finally stopped the Garnet, but Sus- 
quehanna was defeated. Then, after three consecutive losses, Delaware and 
Princeton were soundly thrashed, while the last two games, with Pennsyl- 
vania and Lehigh, were lost. 

With four letter men as a nucleus and several very promising substitutes 
and freshmen players, the prospects for a great season were bright. However, 
a severe blow was dealt to the team when Captain Ward and Garber were 
declared ineligible and were not re-instated until mid-season. But Coach 
Fitts was fortunate in uncovering new stars to fill the vacancies. Cates filled 
the gap at center so ably that he has been selected to captain the 1928 team. 
Tipping, a freshman, also created a sensation by his fine work. These men, 
together with the veterans, Richards, Baum, Winde and Lippincott, and 
another freshman, McDiarmid, formed a powerful combination. 

The season opened with an easy victory over Osteopathy. Swarthmore 
grabbed an early lead and was never headed. Howard Cates did great work 
in his first varsity game, scoring fourteen points. 

The following evening DrexeTs highly-touted five was met and snowed 
under by a 40-13 score. Richards showed all of his previous year's form when 
he made fifteen points. Winde, who acted as captain, played a fine game 
at guard. 

Real thrillers from start to finish, 
the next two games with Ivluhlenburg 
and Stevens proved to be. In each case 
Swarthmore emerged victorious by the 
margin of a single point. In the Muh- 
lenburg game, the final outcome was 
not determined until two weeks later. 
The rooters created so much of an up- 
roar, in the hectic extra period, that the 
final whistle could not be heard. Just 
as the game ended Roy Baum sank a 
goal from the floor. Because of the noise 





RICKARDS, MANAGER 



TiALCYOl^ 




a 



it is doubtful whether the shot was made before or after 
the game was over. As Referee Sutton did not hear the 
timekeeper's whistle, and as Managers Rickards, of 
Swarthmore, and Dehringer, of Muhlenburg, did not see 
the shot it was impossible for them to render a decision on 
^ ^,,^. ^^ the question. If the goal was to count Swarthmore would 
^H^HpHi win by a score of 32-31, while if, on the other hand, the 
■■^^ goal was scored after the whistle, Muhlenburg would win 

W V by a 31-30 count. No compromise could be made, so the 

■ B coaches and referee finally agreed to refer the matter to Mr. 

W W Oswald Tower, chairman of the Intercollegiate Rules 

f _:;£ ■ Interpretation Committee. Mr. Tower ruled that the 
RICH.1RD3 referee's whistle ends the game and not the timekeeper's, 

so the decision was awarded to Swarthmore. This game will never be for- 
gotten by its spectators. After the Garnet led 18-12 at half-time, Muhlenburg 
tied the score at the end, 28-28. An extra five minute period had to be played 
with the exciting result just mentioned. Baum and Gates were the high 
scorers for Swarthmore. 

The Garnet team again weakened in the second half of the Stevens game. 
After having snatched a comfortable lead in the first period, Swarthmore was 
fortunate to win out. Bv a determined rally in the second half Stevens tied 
the score at 23-23. Tipping' s foul in the closing minutes won the game. 
Baum and Gates were again the leading players for Swarthmore. 

Another bitterly fought game, resulting in Swarthmore' s first defeat of 
the season, occurred when Ursinus was played. In this game, as in the two 
previous ones, the Garnet slumped after holding a large lead early in the 
game. After trailing for ten minutes by a 12-2 score, Ursinus rallied and 
was far in the lead by the middle of the second half. Then Swarthmore got 
working and cut down the difference to four points. How- 
ever, the Gollegeville team, which had conquered Penn 
earlier in the year, finally won, 45-35- The star center of 
the losers. Gates, was injured early in the second period 
and was forced to leave the game. 

With Gaptain Bob Ward and Garber back at their old 
positions, the Susquehanna game resulted in a well-de- 
served victory for Swarthmore. The team played con- 
sistently good basketball throughout the game. Richards 
scored five field goals, while the Garnet guards held the 
opposing forwards to a single goal from the floor. 

After holding an eight point advantage in the first 
few minutes of the next game, with Lafayette, the Swarth- 





■o Hundred and Th'n 




^alc^yon' 



more five slowed down in the middle of the second half 
and was defeated. Baum played a line game, getting four 
double-deckers. 

For the second successive vear Haverford barely 
emerged victorious by a 33-30 score. In the iirst half the 
Hicksites completely outplayed the Orthodox team and 
the half ended with Swarthmore ahead, 20-14. But the old 
second-half jinx again showed itself and Haverford piled 4 

Up eleven points after the intermission before Swarthmore ^ • 1 

could register a point. The home team had very bad luck .js 

with its shots in the closing minutes, several tosses rolline " 1 

around the rim of the basket and dropping out. The work ^ J 

of Melchior, the Red and Black captain, featured the """ 

game. His six held goals spelled defeat for Swarthmore. For the losers, 
Ray Garber starred with five beautiful shots. 

The following week Rutgers was met and another close game resulted, 
Swarthmore finally losing out by a 30-27 score. This made three straight 
defeats for the Garnet. 

The losing streak was broken in the Delaware game, after a rough, 
exciting struggle. The new combination which took the floor for Swarth- 
more made an excellent showing. The hnal verdict was 26-18. Richards 
was high scorer, while Tipping, playing his first game as a regular, showed 
promising form. 

A rather unexpected triumph was registered when Princeton, leader of 
the Intercollegiate League, was overwhelmed, 33-18. Although Princeton's 
first five men did not get into the game, it is doubtful whether they could 
have turned back the Garnet, so fine was the form displayed by the Swarth- 
more players that night. The passing was unusually fast and accurate and 
the shooting was sure. The entire Quaker team starred, 
but Garber with five field goals and a foul shot was par- 
ticularly outstanding. 

After the win over Princeton, Swarthmore was ex- 
pected to give Penn a great battle in their annual contest, 
but the gods decreed otherwise. The suburbanites suffered 
a reaction after their brilliancy in the two previous games 
and put up a poor exhibition of basketball, losing 32-14 
in a very slow, uninteresting match. Garber was the 
single bright light in the playing of the Garnet, getting 
nine of his team's points and playing a fine floor game. 

The season of close games ended with a real thriller. 
Lehigh, with a powerful team which had run up a streak 



^v.mo^ 



LIPPINCOTT 



Page Two Hundred and Thhiy-five 



4,V«%ffi, 



of seven straight victories, was favored to swamp the 
Little Quaker five, but was lucky to get off with its 
winning streak intact. Both teams played fast basketball 
and the game was nip-and-tuck all the way. As usual, 
Swarthmore got off to a lead at the start and was on top 
at the half, 14-10. Lehigh came back strong in the last 
period and the score was deadlocked several times. With 
the count 24-24 and just fifty seconds to go a Lehigh guard 
took the ball and dropped in the deciding goal. Tipping 
and Richards were the home team stars with four and three 
field goals respectively. '^ 

Altogether, the 1927 season can be called very satis- ;„.£._* _ ^ ^ 
factory, although the team played rather inconsistently. tipping 

In every game, the five showed up well in the first half, trailing at half-time 
in only two contests. But, for some reason, the players had a tendency to 
slacken up at the beginning of the second period and several games were lost 
for this reason. 

While only two letter men will remain for next year's team, several var- 
sity players who narrowly missed getting letters will be back and should fill 
the gaps very ably. Much may be expected from Captain-elect Gates, from 
the freshmen stars. Tipping and McDiarmid, and from Garber and McGuire, 
as well as several junior varsity men. 



RESULTS OF SCHEDULE 

Swarthmore 

January 7. Osteopathy at Swarthmore 16 13 

January 8. Drexel at Swarthmore 40 13 

January 14. Muhlenburg at Swarthmore 32 31 

January 15- Stcyens at Hoboken 24 23 

January 18. Ursinus at Collegeyille 35 45 

February 5. Susquehanna at Swarthmore 31 21 

February 9. Lafayette at Easton 20 36 

February 12. Haverford at Swarthmore 30 33 

February 19. Rutgers at New Brunswick 27 30 

February 25. Delaware at Newark, Del 26 18 

March 5. Princeton at Princeton 33 18 

March 8. Pennsylvania at Philadelphia 14 32 

March 12. Lehigh at Swarthmore 24 26 

Totals 362 



I^aZcyo^ 




TRACK 





192-6 Track 

Captain P- Burdette Lewis 

Coach E. LeRoy Mercer 

Manager Frederick L. Redefer 



THE TEAM 



P. Burdette Lewis, mile 
Edmund Q. Wilcox, shot-put 
Frank M. Rumble, quarter-mile 
Richard M. Perdew, mile 
Albert C. Cliff, pole vault 
MiNTER H. Norton, high-hurdles 



Arthur G. Baker, discus 
Louis K. Clothier, two-mile 
John W. Dutton, sprints 
Roy J. Kersey, quarter-mile 
C. Thoburn Maxwell, half-mile 
Russell E. Clift, low-hurdles 



CHAMPIONSHIP RELAY TEAM 



Frank M. Rumble 
John W. Dutton 



C. Thoburn Maxwell 
Roy J. Kersey 



^ALCYO^ 





LEWIS, CAP IAIN 



, M W ACiER 



19x6 Track Review 

A STRONG track team again upheld the 
Garnet of Swarthmore throughout 
the 1926 season, successfully completing 
a strenuous schedule, retaining the 
Middle Atlantic States championship, 
and winning the Middle Atlantic States 
Class B Relay at the Penn Carnival. 
Coach Mercer's men suffered only one 
defeat during the season. 

In the first meet, on April 17th, the 
Swarthmore cinder path athletes made 
their initial appearance of the season 
against Lehigh. An almost perfect day, 
marred only by a chilly spring breeze, brought a colorful crowd of spectators 
out to witness the 69-54 victory of the Garnet. Wilcox started the season in 
the right way by taking an easy first in the initial event, the shot-put. Cliff 
repeated in the pole-vault while Norton, running a fine race, garnered five 
more points in the 120-yard high-hurdles. Dutton, forced to take second in 
the 100-yard dash, more than made up by taking first in the 
broad-jump, with McKeag second, and first in the furlong, 
with Rumble second. Captain Lewis placed first, and Per- 
dew second, in the mile. Lewis, after a brief rest, also ran 
the half-mile, coming in second to Maxwell. Baker won 
the discus and Rumble was barely nosed out by a Lehigh 
man in the quarter-mile. Other points were garnered by 
Spangler, Clift, Clothier and Deacon. 
A week later the Garnet relay team, 
composed of Dutton, Rumble, Maxwell 
and Kersey, defeated teams from seven 
other eastern colleges to win the Middle 
Atlantic States Class B one-mile relay 
championship. The team, although 
unable to equal the record set by the 1925 Garnet team in 
winning the championship, ran the distance in the time 
of 3 minutes, 32J seconds. Baker, the only Swarthmore 
man entered in any individual event, vvon the discus with 
a record throw of 139 feet, 2 inches. 

On April 30th the Garnet trackmen decisively defeated 





MERCER, COACH 






'y^a^j^^M ^he University of Delaware by a score of 82-44. Swarth- 
more captured thirteen out of the possible fourteen first 
places, losing only the javelin. Dutton was the high 
scorer with firsts in both dashes and a second in the broad- 
jump. Rumble took first in the quarter and second in the 
220-yard dash. Norton won ten more points for the 
Garnet with firsts in the high-hurdles and in the high- 
jump. Lewis, running his usual race, easily won the mile. 
Clothier won the two mile and Max- 
well broke the tape in the half-mile 
event with Tollinger second. Wilcox 
won the shot-put. First places were 
PERDEw aisQ .^von bv Baker in the discus, 

McKeag in the broad-jump, Clift in the low hurdles and 

Cliff in the pole-vault. 

Failure to take a first in the javelin throw, the final 

event in the dual meet with Wesleyan, forced the Garnet 

to accept a defeat, the only one of the season, by a 10}4 to 

641^ score. A new event, the hammer throw, in which no 
Garnet man was entered, was in part 
responsible for the defeat. Rumble took 
the quarter-mile, Lewis broke the tape 
in the mile a full twenty yards ahead of Perdew, Vander- 
kleed won the high-jump and Baker placed first in the 
discus. Maxwell took the half-mile event with Lewis 
third. Dutton took the verdict in the furlong and in the 
broad-jump and was second in the century. Clift won the 
low-hurdles. 

The last dual meet of the season 
was held with Haverford on the home 
field. The contest, which ended in a 
64-60 victory for the Garnet, was 
another of those exciting and colorful 

clashes between the two old rivals. Dutton again took 

first in the dashes and second in the broad-jump. Captain 

Lewis won both the mile and two mile events with Max- 
well and Clothier, respectively, second in each event. 

Maxwell won the half-mile with Perdew second. Norton 

and Lewis of Haverford, fought out the high-jump, tieing 

at 5 feet, 9 inches. With the score tied. Baker clinched the 

meet by taking an easy first in the discus, the last event. 



MAXWELL 



iSlriiSl. 



is. 



?\ 



^: 



Page Ttro Hundred and Forty-one 




The Little Quaker rivals again met on the cinder path 

a week later when they fought it out for the intercollegiate 

crown. The Garnet stars carried off the honors, winning 

the fourteenth annual meet of the Middle Atlantic States 

Collegiate Athletic Association, by the narrow margin of 

one-half point, from Haverford, 29 to 18}4. The points 

were garnered by Dutton, first in the 

furlong and in the broad-jump and 

second in the century; by Norton, 

third in the high-hurdles; by Baker, 

first in the discus, by Maxwell, 

third in the half-mile; and by Lewis, 

Wilcox and Cliff who placed fifth 

in the mile, shot-put and pole-vault, respectively. 

Baker, Lewis, Maxwell and Dutton made the trip to 
Harvard for the national intercollegiate meet. Baker, the 
only Swarthmore athlete to reach the finals, took third in 
the discus in a field of over a hundred 
starters. 

The Intercollegiates closed the suc- 
cessful season. Although three good men. Rumble, Wil- 
cox and Perdew are lost by graduation, much may be 
expected of the 1927 team which will again be led by 
Lewis. 



April 17. Lehigh . . 
April 23-24. Penn Relays 

Delaware . 

Wesleyan . 

Haverford . 

M.A.S.C.A.A 

I.C.A.A.A.A. 



Hundred and For 




RESULTS OF THE SCHEDULE 

Swarthmore Opponents 

Home 69 

Awav 
Away 
Away 
Home 
Away 
Away 



'halcyonA! 




LACROSSE 




/^ALCYO?r 




1916 Lacrosse 

Ca-ptain Wm. F. Howard 

Goach Wm. Sproul Lewis 

Manager Frederick S. To'wnley 



THE TEAM 



John K. DeGroot 
Richard McFeely 
Morgan C. Koehnline 
John H. S\vope 
William F. Howard 
Edward F. Lang 
Ellis Bishop 




Charles E. Rickards 



S. Copeland Palmer 
Henry C. Ford 
Horace Roberts, Jr. 
William F. Ogden 
Avery Blake 
Vincent G. Bush 
Paxton Unger 



uo Hundied and Po 




3^ALCYOl7 



19x6 Lacrosse Revie^v 




t; 




HOWARD, CAPTAIN 



^ ■'•?; -. 



LEWIS, COACH 



iHE 1926 lacrosse season was 
marked by decisive victories 
over Oxford-Cambridge, Stevens 
and the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. Coach Lewis' team, al- 
though losing five of eight 
games, scored 46 to 42 points 
of their opponents. All the 
games were hard fought and 
close, being decided bv but one 
or two points in almost every 
case. Oxford-Cambridge went down to defeat 11-8, 
while the University of Pennsylvania, Swarthmore's 
perpetual rival, lost for the fourth straight rime in as many years, 10-1. 
The annual pre-season game was played with the Philadelphia Lacrosse 
Club. The Garnet, led by Captain Howard, and playing well, won 8-2. 
Blake, a sophomore, was the outstanding player, scoring three goals for 
Swarthmore. 

The opening game of the season was played with Oxford-Cambridge on 
the front campus, Swarthmore winning 11-8. Despite the muddy field the 
playing was fast, with Captain Howard scoring early. The count stood 4-4 
near the end of the first half, but as the period closed Blake made a goal 
giving the Garnet a lead which was not again lost. Both teams fought their 
best and the playing kept the large crowd of spectators filled with enthusiasm. 
The Garnet stickmen next traveled to Maryland University, dropping the 
game 4-2. Swope made a goal near the 
end of the first half and Swarthmore 
fought hard, but were unable to defeat 
the Southerners, who scored three times 
in five minutes during the early part of 
the second period. Near the end of the 
game Roberts, a valuable player, broke 
his collar-bone and was lost to the team 
for the rest of the season. 

The next game was with the Army, 
who overcame Swarthmore by the count 
of 2-1. Both teams fought bitterly and 
DeGroot, playing a great game, stopped 





TOWNLEY, MAN.^GER 



MC FEELY 



Khalcyon 




K^f 



^m- 



\ 




many shots. The Army gained their lead in the early part of the first period, 
while Rickards scored for Swarthmore during the second half. The Garnet 
stopped Baxter and Wilson of the Army for the rest of the game but were 
unable to tally again after Rickards' goal. 

Laughing at the Jinxes of the previous two years, Swarthmore took the 
next game from Stevens Tech 8-3- The contest at 
Hoboken was poorly played in general, but Captain 
Howard exhibited a stellar game on defense and made 
three goals in addition. 

By excellent playing the next week Swarthmore 
held Johns Hopkins, Intercollegiate Champions for 
the last two years, to the lowest score made during 
their season. The game, played at Swarthmore, was 
lost 6-1. Penalties were numerous and Bush made the 
Garnet's only score. 

The following game with Lehigh at Bethlehem 
was lost 7-5, despite Swarthmore's lead in the first half. 
Rickards scored a tying goal as the final whistle blew, 
necessitating an extra five minutes of play, when Lehigh 
clinched the game by making two goals. 

The succeeding game, played with Rutgers, was also 
lost after the Garnet had succeeded in leading through the 
first half. The playing was rather slow but Bush and 
Blake again distinguished themselves by scoring two 
goals each. However, further attacks were resisted and 
the count stood 6-5. 

The University of Pennsylvania went down to humble 
defeat at the hands of the Garnet twelve in the next game 
played on the front campus. The score, 10-1, was the 
cleanest victory of the season. Penn was routed, while 
the Swarthmore stickmen, by fast and steady playing, 




Tuo Hundred and Forly-six 



^^HALCYO^ 





pushed ball after ball past the 
Penn goal tender. Blake scored 
three goals in succession at 
the start and again in the 
second period, making his sea- 
son total of 11. 

The last game of the sched- 
ule was lost to Penn State, 
5-3- The Nittonies gained a 
lead in the first half which 
the Garnet could not over- 
come, although Swarthmore 
made two points to State's one 
in the second period. Rickards scored 
in each half, bringing his total to eleven 
and giving him even honors with Blake 
as high scorer. 

Others whose work was especially 
noteworthy were Captain Howard and 
Captain-elect Dick McFeely, who dis- 
tinguished himself by his excellent de- 
fense work. Ford and Palmer deserve 
mention, as well as Jack DeGroot, goal 
keeper, who stopped many a difficult 
ball and saved games on several occa- 
sions. The season, while not the best 
Swarthmore has had, was certainly worth while and upheld her reputation 
in sporting circle?. 







ivo Hundred and Forly-seven 




'HALCYON 






DE GROOT 



RESULTS OF THE SCHEDULE 

Swarthmore 

April 8. Oxford-Cambridge at Swarthmore 11 

April 10. University of Maryland at College Park 2 

April 17. Army at West Point 1 

April 24. Stevens at Hoboken 

May 1. Johns Hopkins at Swarthmore 1 

Mav 8. Lehigh at Bethlehem 5 

Mav 15. Rutgers at Swarthmore 5 

Mav 19. U. of P. at Swarthmore 10 

May 27. Penn State at Penn State 3 

Totals 46 




y^ 




wo Hundred and Fo 



'HALCYON 



o \ 




BASEBALL 





192.6 Baseball 

Captain Carroll E. Ogden 

Coach Robert Dunn 

Manager F. Maxwell Shuster 



THE TEAM 



Carroll E. Ogden 
John W. Neely 
Pierce L. Richards 
Clifford E. Fix 
John H. Lippincott, Jr. 
Malcolm B. Petrikin 



LeRoy G. Baum 
Horace McGuire 
Christian B. Adelman 
Howard B. Cates 
William Sill 
Samuel Eckerd 



Edward T. Bartlett 



/HALCYON 



3^6 Baseball Review 




K^ 




OGDEN, CAPTAIN 



bHUSTER, MANAGER 



^N extremely heavy schedule was 
-booked by Manager Shuster, con- 
sisting of twenty games, ten at home 
and ten away. With only five letter 
men to use as a nucleus, Coach Dunn 
had his difficulties. Much credit is due 
him for the fine manner in which he 
handled the team in his first year as 
coach of baseball at Swarthmore. Using 
as a nucleus, Capt. Ogden, Bartlett, J. 
Lippincott, Neely, Richards and Fix, 
and adding such promising material as 
Adelman, Gates, Petrikin, Baum and 
Sill, Coach Dunn put out a team worthy of respect. Starting the season 
with a rush, the team slumped to mediocrity during the following few 
weeks, but finished the season displaying a fine brand of baseball. This 
was the heaviest schedule booked for a Garnet team in many years, and 
the short space between games had its effect. 

The season was opened with two victories, when the Drexel Institute 
and College of Osteopathy teams were defeated. The opening game, with 
Drexel, although loosely played, was a thriller from start to finish, and 
it was only through timely hitting that Swarthmore emerged victorious 
in the tenth inning by the score of 11-10. The Osteopathy game was decided 
in the first three innings, during which seventeen of the eighteen runs scored 
in the game, were registered. The final score was Swarthmore 12, Osteo- 
pathy 6. 

Swarthmore' s next opponent was 
the Army. The game took place at 
West Point, in the face of a 30-mile gale, 
and under entirely unsatisfactory 
weather conditions. The game was 
loosely played, and because of the un- 
favorable conditions, it was called at 
the end of four and a half innings, the 
Army being on the long end of the 
18-4 score. 

The third week of the season found 
Swarthmore playing three games, win- 





DUNN, COACH 



"halcyonu 




LTPPINCOTT 




ADELMA.V 



ning one and losing two, extremely close and well played 
contests. The University of Pennsylvania triumphed 9-7, 
in a thrilling game featured by a spirited seventh inning 
rally by Swarthmore. However, Penn came back strong 
in the eighth, and the fighting Quakers were forced to be 
satisfied with the short end of the score. Swarthmore 
staged a comeback in the game with St. Johns on the 
home diamond, and were easily returned victors 18-5; 
Gates, the freshman pitcher having the visitors well in 
hand at all times. 

The Garnet was defeated by Franklin and Marshall 3-2, 
in a game played atLancaster. Although the game was close, 
it was not well played, a total of seven errors being made. 
Continuing a heavy schedule, the team 
played four games in one week, being successful 
in only one. In the first of these, Swarthmore 
defeated Wesleyan 5-2 in a game featured by 
Bartlett's masterful pitching and the ability of 
the team to bunch its hits. Bartlett held the 
opposition to two hits in seven innings. The 

defeat by Fordham, 14-0, was the severest of the 
season. The game was replete with errors by Swarth- 
more, and Fordham scored four runs in the first 
inning without making a hit. The game with 
Muhlenberg at Allentown was one of the most excit- 
ing of the season, the Garnet being downed only 
after a bitter struggle. This nip-and-tuck battle was 
won by Muhlenberg in the eleventh inning 4-3- 
William and Mary College defeated 
the Garnet on the latter's home 
ground 6-4, in a close game. The 
NEELi- Garnet's inability to take posses- 

sion of scoring opportunities proved its downfall. The 
visitors bunched their hits to advantage, and thus pro- 
vided the winning tallies. 

The Garnet next defeated Haverford 22-11, and Dela- 
ware 17-7. In the third game of the week, Swarthmore 
bowed to Rutgers 7-6 in ten innings. Heavy hitting by 
Baum and Richards, and effective pitching by Sill featured 
the team's victory over Delaware. The Haverford game 
was one of ragged playing, thirteen errors being made. 





f^ALCYO^ 






The victors made eight of these, and it was only extremely 
heavy hitting by Richards and fairly effective pitching by 
Bartlett that made for a Garnet victory. The Rutgers 
game was very close, and the pitching of Gates encourag- 
ing. Better support in the field would have given him the 
victory he sought. After the first few innings, both 

pitchers twirled airtight baseball. 
BB^*"^ TS ^^^ ^"^^ best-played games of the 

WisatL ^mttetrnM year resulted in a win and a loss for 
Swarthmore. The Garnet defeated La- 
fayette 4-0, and lost to N.Y.U. 5-4. 
The game with Lafayette was featured 
by the extraordinary pitching of Gates, "" 

who allowed only four widely scattered hits. He also 
struck out seven men. The N.Y.U. game was a toss up. 
Neither team seemed able to get the upper hand. Sill 
pitched good ball until the eighth when he weakened, and 
V-^ " - the Garnet was forced to accept defeat. 

*^ - Showing a better brand of baseball, the Garnet de- 

feated Ursinus 8-3, and Susquehanna 12-4, before being 
toppled by Navy 8-1. The brilliant pitching of 
Eckerd featured the Ursinus game, and a fine rally by 
Swarthmore turned the game into a Garnet victory. 
The Susquehanna game resembled the Ursinus contest 
because in it too, the Garnet achieved success through 
a rally. The result of the Navy game was never in 
doubt, the Garnet being completely outplayed by the 
Annapolis nine. Airtight pitching and heavy hitting 
by the victors were outstanding. 
The season closed with a de- 
cisive 7-3 win over Haverford . Bart- 
lett pitched the entire game, and bartlett 
Richards and Ogden featured with some heavy hitting. 
Of the fourteen letter men, half this number are gradu- 
ating, leaving an able group on which to build a new team. 
In addition to these men, much is expected of Burr, W. 
McFeely, Gillette, Smithers and Owrey, who saw some 
action this season. 





CATES 



S^^LCYO^ 






PETRIKIN 



MC GUIRE 



RESULTS OF THE SCHEDULE 

Swarthmore 

April 10. Drexel at Swarthmore 11 

April 12. Osteopathy at Swarthmore .... 12 

April 17. Army at West Point 4 

April 20. U. of P. at Philadelphia 7 

April 23. St. Johns at Swarthmore 18 

April 24. F. and M. at Lancaster 2, 

April 28. Wesleyan at Middletown 5 

April 29- Fordham at New York 

May 1. Muhlenburg at Allentown 3 

May 3. William and Mary at Swarthmore . 4 

May 5- Delaware at Swarthmore 17 

May 7. Haverford at Haverford 22 

May 8. Rutgers at Swarthmore 6 

May 12. Lafayette at Easton 4 

May 15. N.Y.U. at New York 4 

May 18. Ursinus at Swarthmore 8 

May 21. Susquehanna at Swarthmore . ... 12 

May 22. Navy at Annapolis 1 

May 26. Princeton at Princeton 

June 5- Haverford at Swarthmore .... 7 

Totals 147 



Opponents 
10 

6 
18 

9 

5 

3 

2 
14 

4 

6 

7 
11 

7 



5 

3 

4 

8 
11 

3 

136 









s I 



^^^ "2m 








MINOR SPORTS 




Two Hundred and Fifty- 




J^aZcyon" 




1916 Soccer 

Captain John H. Lippincott, Jr. 

Coach Robert Dunn 

Manager Russell Harris 



LETTER MEN 



Christian Adleman 
VanLeer Bond 
Vincent Bush 
Howard Gates 
John Coughlin 
Howard Johnson, Jr. 
Robert Johnson 



John H. Lippincott, Jr. 

John McBride 

G. Stansbury Miller 

Thomas Moore 

James Muir 

Walter Siebert 

Laurence Test 



jl^ALCYO^ 



19x6 Soccer Review 



W 



iTH one of the largest and hardest schedules a Swarthmore soccer team 
has ever faced, the 1926 aggregation passed rather successfully through 
a very gruelling season. The loss of Captain Bartlett and three other regulars 
through graduation was very keenly felt. 

The season started off poorly with two successive defeats, administered by 
Princeton 5-0, and Navy 3-0. However, the team seemed to have found its 
stride after this and won four straight games in brilliant fashion, polishing 
off Chalfonte-Haddon Hall, 4-0, Franklin and Marshall 5-0, and after a close, 
well-played game, blanking the fast University of Toronto team 1-0. Lehigh 
followed and was upset 2-1. 

Then came a reversal of form. Haverford, with one of the strongest teams 
in years, defeated the Garnet 4-1; Lafayette was played to a 3-3 tie, followed 
by the Penn State game in which the Nittany Lions won 4-0. The season 
ended with the Penn Second Team game that decided which of the two 
teams would take permanent possession of the Championship Cup, for having 
won the state title four times. It was only after a bitter struggle on a slippery 
field that Penn came out on top 1-0. 

This year's high scorer was James Muir with a total of four goals, three of 
which he scored in the Franklin and Marshall game. Brilliant teamwork 
and heady playing was particularly evidenced by Captain Lippincott, Cates 
and Coles. 



October 8 
October 16 
November 3 
November 8 
November 13 
November 19 
November 24 
November 29 
December 4 



RESULTS OF SCHEDULE 

Swarthmore Opponents 

Princeton at Princeton 5 

Navy at Annapolis 3 

Franklin and Marshall at Swarthmore 5 

University of Toronto at Swarthmore 1 

Lehigh at Swarthmore 2 1 

Haverford at Haverford 1 4 

Lafayette at Easton 3 3 

Pennsylvania State at State College 4 

University of Pennsylvania (neutral) 1 

12 21 



HALCYON 



tSfe,^- 



[jST*' . 



L^fM«V/l| 



r^. 



19x7 Swimming 

Ca-ptaiti Jack Thompson 

Coach William Barnard 

Ma7iager Robert Lindahl 

LETTER MEN 
Robert Lindahl Henry Parrish 

Ralph Mitchell Edward Sellers 

Minter Norton Shaler Stidham 

Jack Thompson 

Highest Scorers 

Minter Norton 20 

Edward Sellers 18 

Robert Lindahl 18 

Jack Thompson 17 



Page Tuo Hundred and Fijty-eight 



192.7 Swimming Review 

ALTHOUGH defeated in six dual meets out of seven in which the Garnet 
^ swimmers competed, the season of 1927 was by no means a total failure 
for Swarthmore. Bob Lindahl set a new college record of 2:59-7 in the 200- 
yard breast stroke race, and several meets were lost by close margins. 

The six defeats were due as much to the failure of veterans to perform up 
to scratch on account of illness as to lack of capable new men. Stabler, star 
back stroke man of former years, was able to compete in only one meet 
because of an injury to his hands, while two other letter men of last year 
failed to score ten points. Henry Parrish, a freshman, won the fifty yard 
dash in the first two meets and Stidham, a sophomore, secured his first letter. 

Swarthmore was again strong in the diving, which was well taken care of 
by Captain Jack Thompson and Norton. Together they scored thirty-seven 
points. 

The meet with Delaware was perhaps the most exciting, although Swarth- 
more lost, 37-22. Almost every race was close and the score is not indicative 
of the ability of the two teams. The Garnet relay team of Mitchell, Gillette, 
Parrish and Shoemaker, broke the college record in the 200-yard race, but 
since the Delaware quartet won the event the new mark cannot be counted. 
Henry Parrish, a freshman, won the fifty yard free-style race by inches in the 
most thrilling event of the day. 



RESULTS OF THE SCHEDULE 

Swarthmore Opponents 

January 8. Delaware, at home 22 37 

January 14. New York University, at home 18 41 

February 5. Catholic University, away 32 27 

February 12. Lafayette, away 23 36 

February 18. C. C. N. Y., away 15 47 

February 25. Rutgers, at home 8 51 

March 5. Lehigh, away 14 45 

Totals 132 284 



Page Two Hundred and Fifty-nirie 



TIALCYON 




19^6 Tennis 

Capain Hanson H. Hodge 

Coach Charles R. Bagley 

Manager Donald G. Dudley 

THE TEAM 
Hanson H. Hodge R- Fletcher Seymour 

Robert E. L. Johnson Donald G. Dudley 

C. Gordon Hodge 



192.6 Tennis Review 

THE 1926 tennis team which included three men, Seymour, Dudley and 
Hodge, who played four years of varsity tennis at Swarthmore College, 
made a brilliant record for the season by defeating nine teams while losing to 
only two. The Naval Academy and Lehigh were the two teams to conquer 
the netmen coached by Charles R. Bagley. The last match of the year was 
plaved with the University of Pennsylvania who were defeated 4 to 3, giving 
Swarthmore the first victory she has ever obtained over Penn in tennis. 

Although winning more intercollegiate matches than last year's team 
did, the Garnet racket men were unable to hold the Middle Atlantic States 
tennis championship won the previous year when Seymour defeated Dudley 
in the final round of that tournament. Hanson Hodge was defeated in 
the semi-finals of the Middle Atlantic tennis tourney held at Haverford Col- 
lege, while Seymour, defending champion, was unable to compete because 
of honors examinations, and the crown went to Bucknell. 

The season was opened with an easv victory over Army 6-1, and Lafayette, 
Dickinson and Franklin and Marshall were readily overcome 6-0, 4-2, and 
6-0 respectively. Then came the smashing victory of the Navy netmen over 
the Little Quakers 8-1. Johnson, Captain-elect of this year's team, scored the 
only point for Swarthmore. Three more easy victories followed over Wash- 
ington and Lee 6-1, over Rutgers 5-1, and over Wesleyan 4-2. But on Mav 
11th, Lehigh administered a drubbing to Swarthmore on Wharton Courts 
by a score of 5-2. The last two matches of the season resulted in 4-3 victories 
over Haverford and Pennsylvania. The tennis played in the latter match 
was the best seen on Wharton Courts durine the vear. 



RESULTS OF THE SCHEDULE 

Swarthmore Opponents 

April 17. Armv at West Point 6 1 

April 21. Lafayette at Swarthmore 6 

April 24. Dickinson at Swarthmore 4 2 

April 28. Franklin and Marshall at Swarthmore 6 

May L Navy at Annapolis 1 8 

May 4. Washington and Lee at Swarthmore 6 1 

May 7. Rutgers at New Brunswick 5 1 

May 8. Wesleyan at Middletown, Conn 4 2 

May IL Lehigh at Sw^arthmore 2 5 

May 15. Haverford at Swarthmore ' 4 3 

May 25. Pennsylvania at Swarthmore 4 3 

Totals 48 26 



Page Two Hundred and Sixty-one 



S^ALCYOTN 




Winners of the **^" 

JUNIOR Sportsmanship blazers are awarded in the spring of the year, to the 
girls of the Junior class, who have been on class or varsity teams represent- 
ing at least three different sports; who have received the required number of 
points; and who have shown the most interest and enthusiasm, the best 
ability and sportsmanship, during the three previous years. 
The following girls received blazers : 



Alice M. Jenkinson 



Frances McCafferxy 



Lois Thompson 




Winners of the "S" 

Sweaters are awarded to Varsity team members who play at least half 
of the total time of the Varsity games, a garnet sweater with a garnet "S" 
shaded white for Hockey, and a white sweater with a white "S" shaded 
garnet for Basketball. 

The following girls received sweaters for 1926: 



HOCKEY 



Sarah E. Percy, Captain 
Carolyn C. Buckwell, Manager 
Frances Bates 
Elisabeth Jenkins 
Gertrude M. Jolls 
Anne Kennedy 



Mary Walton 



BASKETBALL 



Frances McCafferty 
Virginia Melick 
Anna Rickards 
Lily Tily 

Elizabeth L. Vaughan 
Anne Waln 



Alice M. Jenkinson, Captain 
Frances McCafferty, Manager 
Esther Felter 
Gertrude M. Jolls 



Anna Rickards 
Charlotte S. Salmon 
RuEY Sieger 
Mary Walton 



^HALCYO^ 




Women's Athletic Association 

President Alice M. Jenkinson, '27 

Vice-Preiident Gertrude M. Jolls, '28 

Secretary Marion L. Bonner, '29 

Treasurer Gertrude B. Sanders, '28 



ATHLETIC COUNCIL 



May G. Brown, '27 
Carolyn C. Buckwell, '27 
Anna W. Hull, '29 



Mary M. Livezy, '28 
Frances D. McCafferty, '27 
Mary Walton, '29 



Miss Elizabeth Lanning, Director of Physical Education 
Miss Winifred Chapman, Assistant Director 



Halcyon 




HOCKEY 




^lALCYON 




19x6 Hockey 

Caftain Sarah E. Percy 

Coach Elizabeth F. Lanning 

Manager Carolyn C. Buckwell 



THE TEAM 



Sarah E. Percy' 
Elizabeth Vaughan 
Elisabeth Jenkins 
Frances McCafferty 
Mary Walton 
Anne Waln 



Anna Rickards 
Frances Bates 
Lily Tily 
Virginia Melick 
Anne Kennedy 
Gertrude Jolls 




^HALCYONU 



1916 Hockey Revie^v 

A GREATLY increascd number of rooters, both men and women, came out to 
cheer the 1926 hockey team captained by Sarah E. Percy. This enthusi- 
astic support and interest was most gratifying to the players and certainly 
showed fine spirit. 

The Varsity this year missed Virginia Brown as center half and ex-captain 
Lydia Roberts as full back. With the exception of these two and Mary 
Roberts who played left wing, the squad remained the same as that of '25, 
with the addition of several valuable freshmen. 

In the first game of the season the Garnet team started out with a bang 
by defeating Ursinus to the tune of 13-2. Mary Walton kept her last year's 
record for being high scorer. A week later the team had a chance to prove 
its strength in the game with Merion Cricket Club. The backfield deserved 
special credit for the innumerable attempts at goals they broke up. Lily 
Tily, Gert Jolls, Anne Kennedy and Sal Percy were fighting every minute of 
the game against Anne Townsend, Ail-American Captain, and Kitty Rolin, 
also an All-American player. At the end of the first half the score was tie, 
1-1. Then Merion made another goal, only to be tied once more in the last 
minute of play by Anne Wain, the game ending with a 2-2 tie. 

The game with Swarthmore Club resulted in a 5-3 score in favor of the 
Garnet. Several substitutes were put on the field in this game. 

Temple gave Swarthmore a hard and exciting game this year. It was 
spectacular in that two penalty bullys were given. Betty Vaughan did some 



TF 



iV* 



'■i^ ^ 



m. 



ku 



PERCY, CAPTAIN 



LANNING, COACH 



BUCKWELL, MANfAGER 



Page Tii'o Hundred and Sixty-seven 





no^ 



MC CAP FERT Y 



mighty clever dribbling and succeeded in breaking the tie made by Anna 
Rickards in the first half. However, Vanetta Rickards, who played for 
Temple, shot the ball through the goal-posts leaving the score tie when the 
final whistle blew. 

The only game lost was to Bryn Mawr. The muddy condition of the field 
retarded the speed of both teams. The final score was 3-1, an improvement 
over last year's defeat, 3-0. Swarthmore put up a plucky fight and if con- 
ditions had been more favorable, they would possibly have given the Main 
Liners an even harder fight for victory. 

The last game of the season was an overwhelming victory for the Garnet 
over Beaver College with a 6-1 score. 

Among those who received their Varsity letter were two freshmen, Anna 
Rickards, left wing, and Frances Bates, right halfback. 





Five Swarthmore players, Mary Walton, Betty Vaughan, Anne Kennedy, 
Lily Tily, and Captain Percy, tried out for the All-Philadelphia Team, and 
in the face of stiff competition from the club members it was a great honor 
for two of them to receive places when the teams were chosen. Mary Walton, 
as left wing, had a place on the All-Philadelphia second team, while Anne 
Kennedy was on the reserve defense squad. 

Swarthmore loses but two players by graduation this year. Captain Percy 
and Virginia Melick. With the wealth of material left to start the 1927 
season, the Garnet looks forward to an undefeated team. 





VAUGHAN 



ij^ALCYO^ 





RESULTS OF THE SCHEDULE 

Swarthraore Opponents 

October 15. Ursinus, at Swarthmore 13 2 

October 19. Merion Cricket Club, at Swarthmore 2 2 

October 29- Swarthmore Club, at Swarthmore 5 3 

November 5. Temple, at Swarthmore 2 ' 2 

November 12. Bryn Mawr, at Bryn Mawr 1 3 

November 19. Beaver College, at Swarthmore 6 1 

Totals 29 13 




j^ALCYON 




BASKETBALL 




192.7 Basketball 

Capain Alice Jenkinson 

Coach Elizabeth Lanning 

Manager Frances McCafferty 

THE TEAM 
Alice Jenkinson Ruey Sieger 

Gertrude N. Jolls Mary Walton 

Esther Felter Anna Rickards 

Charlotte Salmon 




'halcyon 



19x7 Basketball Review 

SwARTHMORE has just Completed an- 
other brilliant basketball season. 
For two years now the team has been 
undefeated. The first two games were 
taken over without much trouble. 
Swarthmore Club, the only new oppo- 
nent this year, went down at 43-27, 
while the West Philadelphia Club was 
easily defeated as seen by a score of 



The next game with George Washing- 
ton University, on the opponents' floor 
proved to be a better balanced and more 
exciting game. However, the Garnet sextette failed to become frightened 
on their huge floor and final whistle blew with the score at 27-14- 

The next game with Temple was played away also, but Swarthmore's 
strong team refused to be upset and showed a remarkable degree of tight 
and pep during the whole game, which ended 43-6. The Germantown 
Collegiates made the fifth victory. This game was fast and well-played 
and ended at 41-21. 

Again Bryn Mawr was played, this year in the fastest and best game of 
the season. The Garnet team had to fight every inch of the way. The Bryn 
Mawr team was much heavier and stronger than any of the other teams so 
far met, so that it was only by the usual accurate shooting and passing of 



.AlFERTY, MANAGER 



JENKINSON, CAPTAIN' 




JOLLS 



enty-thr 



|!^\LCYO^ 




Swarthmore that enabled them to win by a 44-38 score. 

The last game was played at home against Adelphi from 
Brooklyn. The previous year they had given a stiff con- 
test, but this year they failed to get started until the 
second half and in the end the score found Swarthmore 
leading 47-16. This game ended a most successful season; 
Swarthmore scoring 305 points and her opponents 134. 

The whole team and substitutes deserve every bit of 
credit which can be given to them. Four girls won their 
sweaters for the first time; namely, Anna Rickards, the 
only freshman, Mary Walton, Esther Felter and Ruey 
Sieger. The squad will lose their captain, Alice Jenkinson, 
next year, who has so successfully led her team, and played 
such an able game each time at center. With Mary Walton as her diminutive 
side center the middle of the floor was skilfully managed. Gertrude Jolls 
played her usual alert and clever game as forward and with the help of 
Anna Rickards, the goals rolled up very quickly. Salmon and Sieger as 
guards were particular about the number of goals they allowed at their end 
of the floor. 

RESULTS OF THE SCHEDULE 

Swarthmore Opponents 

February 4. Swarthmore Club at Swarthmore 43 27 

February 12. West Philadelphia Club at Swarthmore 60 12 

February 18. George Washington University at Washington . . 27 14 

February 25. Temple University at Temple 43 6 

March 5. Germantown Collegiate Club at Swarthmore .41 22 

March 12. Bryn Mawr at Bryn Mawr 44 38 

March 19. Adelphi at Swarthmore 47 16 




RICKARDS 






Italian Carnival 



Order of Exercises 

May Pole Dance on East Campus 
Senior-Junior Step Songs 
Procession of Carnival Queen 
Italian Carnival 

ONE of the most beautiful May Day exercises Swarthmore has ever had 
was given last May, 1926. There was an Italian Carnival with Frances 
Spence, '26, as Queen. Agnes Hood, '29 was her Maid of Honor and Esther 
Howard, '27, Elizabeth Winchester, '27, Anne Philips, '28, and Elizabeth 
Vaughan, '28, were the attendants. 

The stage of the amphitheatre was an Italian villa garden and beyond 
the garden wall, revellers passed to and fro for it was Carnival Day. Every- 
where there was singing, dancing and 
revelling. The revellers made way, 
for the Queen and her attendants had 
entered the garden to watch the cele- 
bration. 

The gentry were eager to entertain 
their Queen. For her pleasure they 
danced a stately gavotte. Suddenly 
one of them spied a flower girl. He 
called her and she came bearing her 
tray of bright flowers. Having seen 





the Queen of the Carnival she skipped away to bring her sisters. They came 
in smiling and coaxed the Queen to buy a flower as they danced before her. 

The peasants too did honor to their Queen. Quaintly dressed, they bowed, 
nodded and danced before her throne. 

Then in stole Columbine (Betty Miller, '26) but not alone for Harlequin 
(Virginia Melick, '27) and Pierrot (Virginia Brown, '26) followed her. 
There was a lively flirtation but Pierrot had little luck. 

From the bazaar came mannequins to display their soft and bright shawls. 
Suddenly there was a sound of tambourines in the air. It grew louder and 
louder and then in whirled the gypsies and danced their tarantella for the 
Queen. Two banditti (Caroline Robison, '29, and Olive Deane, '28), the boldest 
pair, ventured their luck at begging and then flaunted their gains in exultation. 
The dance burst forth anew — faster and faster. With a leap of laughter it 
ended, engulfed the willing Queen and followed her off to the Carnival. 



h>,*" ■ 



[•t;- -^^ 



Page Two Hundred and Sevenly-six 




Feature 



Page Two Hundred and Seventy-seven 




For the Very Young 



Staunchan Gray could drink skimmed milk, 

His wife could drink chlorine, 
And so between the both of them 

They licked the tumblers clean. 

Staunchan, Staunchan, 

Slowly munchin' 

Found some shells, and couldn't lunch them. 

In a soup went every shell 

And then he ate them very well. 

Waiter, Waiter, 
Whither so fleet? 

"I've been to the kitchen to serve up the meat. 
Waiter, Waiter, 
What do you now? 

"Tm getting some ketchup to drown out the 
cow^. ' ' „ 

Crispy flakes, crispv flakes. 

Cereal Man, 

All I ask is one dish of bran. 

One for my breakfast, and one for my tea, 

And one to take up to my room with me. 

Some showers 're hot. 

Some showers 're cold. 
But no showers ever run 

The way they're told. 

Little Miss Margery 
Sat in the library 

Studying- hard for next day; 
Along came a lover. 
And sat down beside her. 

And frightened her studies away. 

A dillar, a dollar, 
A library scholar. 

Why don't you keep awake? 
You used to sleep at twelve o'clock. 

But now you sleep at eight. 



Selden Y. Trimble of all Swarthmore men 
Stayed in bed 'till the clock struck ten. 
Got to his classes entirely too late, 
Now can you guess what is his horrid fate? 
(Honors Work) 

Dee Diddle Dumpling 
Freshman John 

Cut across campus without his cap on. 
One Sophomore saw him. What did he do? 
Ah — Now that cap sticks to John's head like 
glue. 

Mary had a little plate. 

It was of cardboard white, 
And everywhere that Mary went. 

She looked an awful sight. 

She wore it down to class one day, 
Which was a Freshman rule, 

It made the teachers very mad 
To see that plate in school. 

The South Wind doth sing. 

And we shall have spring. 

And what shall the fussers do then? Oh, dear! 

They will walk by the Crum, 

In spite of the scum. 

And talk about nothing but love. Oh, dear! 

Two and seven baseball men 

Up before the bat. 
Take one swing at every ball. 

And let it go at that. 

The coach is on the sidelines, 

Pretty full of grin; 
The students stamp the grandstands, 

Yelling as we win. 

A coed's feeling cocky 

Airing her new clothes, 
Along comes a right foul fly ball 

And hits her on the nose. 




o Hundred and Seventh-nine 




^HALCYON 





Two Hundred and Eighty 




jl^ALCYO^ 



*■ T 



i-l 



The Widows of Worth 



Thev flourish in springtime 
When flowers are budding, 
In springtime when flowers 
Are budding in spring; 
The birds are all singing 
Sweet tunes to the springtime 
Which makes the sweet birds 
On the campus to sing. 
Thev lure us poor pilgrims 
To highways to Chester 
Sweet highways, with mem'ries 
Of Swarthmore which seem 
To haunt us in dreamland 
When springtime's dear fancy 
Seems still to allure us 
When, dreaming, we dream. 
When pilgrims from Chester — 
Recalled in our dreaming — 
Roll by in great trucks 
Or a Ford or Rolls-Royce, 
Be he pilgrim or chauffeur 
Or dreamer or pilgrim. 
The widows that greet him 
Will make him rejoice. 



Thev wave from the casements 

And beckon so warmly 

Thev seem like the flowers 

That bud in the spring, 

So ruby and rosy 

And red, even garnet — 

The Garnet of Swarthmore 

Whose praises we sing. 

Yes, sing we to Swarthmore 

Whose memories linger 

Dear Swarthmore, Sweet Swarthmore 

Best college of all; 

We'll sing in the springtime 

And even in winter, 

Then too, in the summer 

As well as the fall. 

Ah, yes when we wander 

About her fair campus. 

The birds must be singing 

All over the earth; 

For happv they make us 

A type for endurance — 

No speed in their make-ups — 

The widows of Worth. 

Ray Hustle Jays, '28 



Page Ttio Hundred and Eighty-two 



TJalcyo^ 





Hundred and Eigh 






192-6 Football Review^ 



The rugby football team of Swarthmore College, and its able coach Pug Pittenger are 
certainly to be congratulated on having completed a wonderful season, I mean, they done 
darn good for the shape they was in. 

Although the team counts among its triumphs victories over such strong aggregations 
as the Y.M.C.A., Home for Aged Chess Players, and The Interior Decorators Association of 
Shamokin, yet the heart-breaking defeat suffered at the hands (and feet) of Jenkins Institute 
for Quaker Missionaries to the Laplanders, rankles in the breasts of our brave fire-fighters. 
The picture shown above was snapped soon after the battle. It shows the boys, licked but 
smiling. "Pride wit punishments" was the title so ■well applied to it bv Lazerus Mercer, 
the little Jew boy who carried the bottles for the team and also the graduate manager. 

The men read from left to right, as is customary. They are Teddy Best, Tommy Clack, 
Percy Richards, Rollo Ward, and Jaimee Tomlin. Rollo looks, and is, in pretty bad condition 
for a Phi Bete. The burly bruiser ^vho played opposite him must never have seen a Sunday 
School, for a more unprincipled ruffian never stepped on green grass. This shut-eye bit Rollo's 
left third toe severely. Rollo, however, kept his self-control, which so infuriated the brute 
that he swore horribly. The vigilant referee heard him, and he was immediately excused from 
the game. Jaimee Tomlin accounted for his black eye by the fact that he ran into a door in 
the locker room between halves. His explanation is, of course, accepted. The other three open 
students emerged from the game with bodies unscathed, but with minds firmlv determined 
to win the rubber next vear. 





I^ALCYO^ 




192.7 Baseball 



The above mezzo tint is an all too faithful reproduction of the bunch of bat-boys who 
last year wore the college's baseball suits. The barge pilot in the center, with the at- 
tractive bicycle, one Lippincott by name, captained this cosmopolitan bunch of Concords. 
To the trusty piece of aluminum which he so fondly grasps by the antlers is due no small 
part of the credit for the rumor that John is a fast man. The classic poses struck by the deck- 
hands on either flank are inordinately characteristic of McGuire and Adelman, under which 
innocent names these two cut-throats cloak their real identity. The pair of them are aesthetic 
to the core. Beau Richards, the beauty with the golf racquet, has been caught by the camera 
in a typical mood. Pinky never so much enjoys himself as when he and his trusty little side- 
kick, which he so lovingly fondles in his mitts, are out for a quiet stroll in the woods. The 
graceful nymph in full relief answers to no other name than Gates, and is used at odd moments 
in catching practice. The reserved-appearing Swedish youngster at the left rear — a daffodil 
called McCook — is in reality a regular on the strong and mighty Travellers Club. (His 
picture is used here by special arrangement with his managers in the hope that a careless 
observer may mistake this wrecking crew for a baseball team). Disregarding the fact that 
their best score was 16-1 with these pansies in the air holding the big 1, the season must be 
acknowledged a howling success. 



jl^ALCYO^ 




"Bang! bang! and two Garnet men bit the dust" 

The Swarthmore lacrosse clubbe ably lived up to its name during the 1927 season. In 
no contest was the Garnet team out-swatted. Against several colleges Swatmore, although 
possessing much less equipment in the form of knives, hatchets and axes, nevertheless gave 
more than they received in the form of personal damages. Trees and even a Bush aided the 
Swatmore cause by hindering the other team's attack. 

The hardest game of the season was that with the Merry Lion yellow backs. Their 
camouflaged uniforms enabled them frequently to sneak up and hurl a hatchet at one of our 
unarmed men before he could raise a finger to ward off the blow. But once more Swatmore 
finally triumphed, capturing 17 Merry Lion teeth, 3 heads, 4 legs, and 3 arms, to 5 quarts of 
blood, 2 ears, 3 eyes and one nose lost in the good cause which made Swatmore's margin of 
victory, one badly bent and rusted collar-bone. 



JmALCYO^^ 



yj^^ 




^^\LCYO^ 




t<fi^m^'-' 





^_ >^eW Ii£^'^ MAKES 



AFTfR 





SmALCYO^ 



Swatmore Cowitch Witt No Mentels Rizervashuns 



So it vance growed op old Swatmore 
Ov all cowitches de svellest 
\'here could boiz und goils togeder 
Go to loin dere hetchicashuns. 




"De Beeg Chif Raining Vaters" 

So it Stood bv Pennsy's Railroad 

On de hill — dose Alma Madeher 

Ov de biggest hall was Peritch 

Pessege ^veys for demes und dose tings. 

In dis tippee was de uffice 

Ov de beeg chif Raining Vaters 

He should mek de gran howcumzes 

Vhen de studunts do dere cles cutz. 

In de rear end part from Peritch 

Vas de keetchins — hot witt steemy — 

Vhere vas cukked de testy screpples — 

Vhere vas mished de mished patetos. 

Qvick und easy vas de soivice 

Grafy buls hipped witt pust tustis 

Ov de mud vas in de cuffy 

Ov de melk witt leffing vaters. 

Here once woiked de uppen studdent, 

Ov all menlv types de chussest 

He should belance trays witt hepples 

To perwide dose carben hydrets. 

Op agenst de time his coming 

He was hup to hall de hensers 

Soft for heem deese crosswords poozle 

Mester for hall seetuhashuns. 



Pled witt besketsball und pukker, 

Vot a deevel witt de fimmales, 

Never took a fence witt keeding, 

Drenk de melk-skeks joost lak vater. 

He should pel witt Raining Vaters 

Joined him op his geng a mimber. 

Popular op from de cempoos 

GufFerments for studdunts lidder. 

Wur heem kneekers lak de gulffers 

Drenk de tea for hunners clesses 

Boss for Young Mans Club from Chreestians 

Poifect muddle cowitch studdunt. 

Greduly he greduhated 

Out onto de voild he guzz it 

Smartest keed from all his clesmets 

Brain chocked fill witt airyoudeeshuns. 

But de luck vas op agenst heem 

Efry vhere vas no piece uppen 

Seen his unly chence vas tiching 

Pecked his beg und sed, "So long boiz."' 

Beck vunce more is he at Swatmore 

Tells de seenyors beezness mettods 

Writes de buks for eeconumics, 

Plez to draw your un conclushuns. 




Hundred and N 




N*-"- 



mALCYON\1 



/^ 



00^ S 



tf*iS^^ 



»l 



For three years 

I groped in the 

dark 

Daily loneliness that I could not throw off. — A 
feverish groping in the dark. I ivas many pounds 
underweight . 

I had often read of the wonderful results of 
your safety matches, but for a long time I did not 
think of Matches in connection ti'ith myself. 

Finally I decided to make the trial. I asked 
her. It turned out to be very easy and simple. To- 
day I am a strong, robust man. I am reaching 
toivard the light of the flame you have kindled, and 
am now a perfect picture of health and love. 

Cope Palmer. — 1927. 



I lived a hard life, — I was over- 
worlced and looked it. I was never 
a success in life. Then I came to 
College and struck a Match. Ever 
since then Gert and I have been to- 
gether constantly. I have suc- 
ceeded, — I am happy — so is she. A 
warm glow gleams in mv eyes. 

Moose Winde~-1927. 



iWȣ* 



The Swarthmore Safetv Match 
brings happiness to those who strike 
it. Hearts beat faster, faces blush 
brighter, and proud souls feel like 
fighting the world. . This Safety 
Match cures all ills. It can easily 
be tried in the domestic atmosphere 
of Swarthmore College. 

Write for free copy of the latest book- 
let from the Love Department, S. C, 
P.D.Q.,—G. V.ni Hart, President; 
Sal Percy, Vii^e-president; Petricken- 
Kobinson, Secretary-Treasurer. 



I was of course familiar with the fact that fresh, new love has nutri- 
tious, helpful properties and strikes a bright flame. But curiously enough, 
it had no: occurred to me to try it myself until I was running down. 
Then it proved so efficacious in correcting my fatigue, nervousness, and 
loss of appetite, that I write to. her every day. Your light has shown 
the wav clear to run mv course. 

Burt Lewis— 1927. 



Girls avoided me on account of my weak appearance, and I was subjected to many 
embarrassing remarks. I became grouchy and unhappy. I courted many girls with no 
success. Finally I was urged to go with Linda, and after a few months I was entirely 
cured. The light of vour match has done wonders. 

Don Dudley— 1926 



Pa^e Two Hundred and Ninety-twc. 



TlALCYO^ 



The night is fine. 
But those books! 



A Swarthmore Spiritual 

All: 

Oh, Lord, have mercy on me! Ain't it mean 
That years ago when I started off to College, 
My father told me I was coming here for knowledge? 
Oh, Lord, have mercy on me! Ain't it mean? 

First Tenor: 

The air is keen. 
Lord, ain't it mean? 

Second Tenor: 

There's Harold Lloyd in Chester to be seen. 

But my conscience pricks me. Lord, ain't it mean? 

Baritone: 

Now, I have a pocketbook that's lean. 

'Taint no good that way. Lord, ain't it mean? 

Bass: 

Think of my Phi Bete key with coat of sheen. 
But I'll never get it. Lord, ain't it mean? 

All; 

Oh, Lord, have mercy on me! Ain't it mean 

That all my ideals have been shattered, 

As if it really, truly, never mattered. 

Oh, Lord, have mercy on me! Ain't it mean? 

First Tenor: 

Once, an Open Scholar I might have been. 
But I couldn't punt. Lord, ain't it mean? 

Second Tenor: 

I learned my necking and petting from Harold Teen. 
With the co-eds they don't rate. Lord, ain't it mean? 

Baritone: ■ 

To-morrow, is my appointment with the Dean. 
I never read Kipling. Lord, ain't it mean? 

Bass: 

If I had a gun, I'd fix my bean. 

But I've got no spark. Lord, ain't it mean? 

All: 

Oh, Lord, have mercy on me! Ain't it mean 
That years ago when I started off to College, 
My father told me I was coming here for knowledge? 
Oh, Lord, have mercy on me! Ain't it mean? 



Page Two Hundred and Ninely-jour 



3^ALCVO>r 



Where There's a Will There's a Way 

"Ting-a-ling-ling-ling! We want DcGroot!" 

"Holy Smokes! I forgot to bring the dessert in for my tables. It's funny they 
didn't call me before this. They must be hungry." 

Jack DeGroot, the born waiter, saunters across the dining-room to his tables. 
Nine hungry mouths gape open and demand, "Nine dishes of bran." 

"Not serving bran; last season's wheat crop was a failure." 

Jack carelessly swings his tray over his shoulder and goes out singing. 

"Oh! they're such nice people, such nice people. They go wild, simply wild 
over me." 

The scene shifts to the kitchen. Mrs. Hallahaq, the careful guardian of the 
pantry, sees Jack and immediately opens fire. 

"Jack, vat makes you so schlow? Der dessert ist all put avay." 

"Huh! 'Zat so? I was hurrying as fast as I could. Oh well, that's all right, 
they can fill up on butter." 

"VyJack, you've took in tree helbings already. Dat's it, dat's vy de college ist 
losing money. Vy chust de oder day von of de vaitresses told me dot von boy used 
nine bieces of butter for von meal. Now dat's entirely too much — almost half a 
bound." 

"Zat so! Well, Mrs. Hallahan, cheer up. They're raising cows in Wharton 
quad next year, w^e've already got a good crop of garlic. And tuition's going up, 
you'll be able to serve turkey twice a week." 

"Don't you believe dat. Ve von't get no more money for foodt. Vy — " 

"Listen, I better be getting this dessert in to my tables or they'll be eating the 
napkins." 

Jack wanders into the dining-room. To his satisfaction the students at his 
table have all vacated. 

Jack starts in on the dessert. 




wo Hundred and Nine/y-six 



fmALGYON 



FOR THE LAST TIME ( 

NO? 



OH, G-ENTLEI^EN, DO HAVE PiTYf THINK 
OF WHAT TH15 HALCYON MEANi TO 
you! CONSIDER \TS NATION-WIOE 

ciacuLATioN f\Np ITS ur«j Paralleled 

_STANDINC- IN REFINED AOV/ERTISI (NGr 

CIRCLED (I . 




Co-Eds Prefer Men 

April 12th. 

One of my boy friends and I were walking along the Crum last night, and he said to me, 
"What are vou thinking of?" And I told him, "Oh, lots." And he asked me if I wrote down 
all my thoughts in a diary, and I said yes. Really, I didn't keep a diary, but I mean I said 
yes to see what he'd say, and he said, "Let me read it?" So then I said maybe; so now 
I have to write a diary. But some things he will have to 
take for granted, because I won't write everything in my 
diary. And last night I crawled in through the window 
of room 155- I've caught onto Jimmy's rounds, so of course 
he missed me. And then I waited a little, and pretty soon 
I heard a Ford rattle around and honk three times, and then 
I got in with another boy friend. I won't mention names, it 
might be incriminating, but he's one of the boys who likes to 
go to Chester, but is really harmless after all. 

April 13th. 

This wasn't my lucky day. I mean I got to Dr. Ryan's class 

late, and he was telling a joke, and I came in in the middle, 

and I wouldn't have gotten the point, but I mean I had heard it 

before. Then he gave back blue hooks. Really, for a girl what 

has the brains and good looks that I have, 42 is quite an awful 

" II- • 1 ve caught ontojimmv s 

low mark. So then I went down, and acted just as sweet with rounds" 




HALCYON 



1877 



IT IS NOW 
50 YEARS SINCE 



1927 



The First Life Insurance Trust 
was established with the Provident 

Being the first financial institution in the United States 
to administer Life Insurance Trusts, the Provident 
offers you a pioneer's knowledge of this specialized 
form of estate service, based on an experience which is 
probably unequalled in this country. 

As we celebrate the semi-centennial anniversary of our 
initiation of this specialized type of trust, we are glad 
to say that we have seen a large number of Life Insur- 
ance Trusts work out to the complete satisfaction of 
our clients — and to the great benefit of the heirs whose 
interests were thereby protected. 

Perhaps you would like to talk over specifically the 
different ways in which a Life Insurance Trust might 

help you. 

PROVIDENT 

TRUST COMPANY 

OF PHILADELPHIA 
AMERICA'S FIRST LIFE INSURANCE TRUSTEE 



Fourth and 
Chestnut Streets 




Capital, Surplus and Reserves 
$13,000,000 




Hundred and Ninety 




Mid-City Office 
1508 Chestnut Street 



Do You Know the Answer to This 

Question ? 

What Is an Insurance Trust? 

The Corn Exchange Insurance Trust is a simple agree- 
ment between yourself and this bank by which you can 
properly protect the proceeds of your Life Insurance 

policies. 

Under such an arrangement this bank will collect your 
life insurance and invest the money in those securities 
that pay the greatest return compatible with safety. 

This bank will then pay the earnings to your wife and 

family year after year in the form of regular income, 

and if you desire will pay installments of principal if 

needed to meet emergencies. 

The remaining principal will eventually be paid to your 
beneficiaries at the time and in the manner you specify 

in the agreement. 

A Corn Exchange Insurance Trust Will 
Insure the Proceeds of Your Life Insurance 




CORN EXCHANGE NATIONAL BANK 



PHILADELPHIA 



Main OflB^ce 
Chestnut at Second 



Central City Office 
15 1 o Chestnut Street 



"halcyo^ 



The Land Title and Trust Company 

BROAD STREET, CHESTNUT TO SANSOM, PHILADELPHIA 

•*• 

Capital, $3,000,000 

Surplus and Profits, $13,500,000 

DEPOSITS received upon which interest is allowed 
TITLES to real estate insured 

LOANS on mortgages and approved securities 
TRUSTS executed 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES rented in burglar-proof vaults 



Vice-President 

and General Counsel 

EDWARD H BONSALL 

Secretary 
LOUIS A. DAVIS 



President 
WILLlAK-l R. NICHOLSON 

Treasurer 
WILLIAM S. JOHNSON 



Vice-President 
LEWIS P. GEIGER 

Trust Officer 
CLAUDE A. SIMPLER 



William R. Nicholson 
Samuel S. Sharp 
John W. Brock 



Ralph H. North 
Joseph E- Widener 
Edward H- Bonsall 
William M. Elkins 



Directors 



George D- Widener 
Eugene W. Fry 
Percival E. Foerderer 
George W. Elkins 



Cyrus H. K. Curtis 
Edgar G. Cross 
John C. Martin 
Thomas Shallcross. Jr. 



Dr. Ryan as I could, but he wouldn't change ir. The college professors are awful tight. I 
guess they're afraid people will exaggerate and call them partial. And I guess maybe they're 
right, because people do talk around here. And then I went to Doc Alleman's class and he 
swore worse then usual. I mean, even if he is nice to the girls, I don't like Doc Alleman's 
swearing. Then I went to Brooksie's class, and Jim didn't sit next to me. I couldn't even hear 
Brooksie knocking down the Republicans I was so afraid Jim wouldn't ask me to the Phi 
Sig Dance, and he always sends me such lovely sweet peas. I mean I like Jim for himself, 
but the sweet peas help a lot. I passed Phil Hicks in the hall. Really, for such a nice looking 
man, I mean it's a shame he's so cynical. If only he knew it, many a girl ^vould be quite glad 
to help him out of his misery. 

April 19th. 

I went out on a date with the famous Pete. I mean Pete is a very nice boy. It being 
springtime, I didn't mention football, so we talked about the Spring. Pete knows quite a 
lot about the Spring. 



April 22nd. 

Miss Lukens gave me an awful black look today, and so did Miss Michener. I guess 
they heard about my coming in late the other night. I guess I'm not the kind of a girl that 
makes a show of her Quaker ancestors. In fact, I haven't any Quaker ancestors, and it's 
quite hard for a girl without Quaker ancestors to come to Swarthmore unprotected. 



T5alcyo^ 




Chartered 1836 

If You Were Contemplating 

New Banking Connections— 

What Qualities Would You Demand? 

OAFETY, by all means. And Service a close second. 

The safety of the Girard Trust Company, one of America's 
oldest financial institutions which has passed through the 
darkest days of our country's history, may be assumed. 

Some idea of the Service offered may be gained by a visit 
to the Company's banking floor. There you will see with 
what celerity your business may be transacted even at 
the busiest time of the day. The client, who finds ordi- 
nary banking hours inconvenient, may transact his bank- 
ing by mail. 

Another point to be considered is the desirability of estab- 
lishing connections with an institution, which offers not 
only a banking service, but a comprehensive trust serv- 
ice as well. 

Your account, whether large or small, will be cordially 
welcomed. Interest at the rate of 2 per cent is credited 
periodically on accounts carrying proper balances. 

Girard Trust Company 

BROAD AND CHESTNUT STREETS, PHILADELPHIA 



Capital and Surplus 

$12,000,000 



EFFINGHAM B. MORRIS 
President 



Member Federal 
Reserve System 



^ALCYON 



There is no secret to financial success . . . 
It is an open book with but four chapters : 

Chapter /—Work Hard 
Chapter //—Play Hard 
Chapter III — Save Systematically 
Chapter IV —Invest Wisely 

We urge the first, recommend the second, 

advise the third and offer every facility 

to realize the fourth. 

First mortgages in any amount for im- 
mediate investment. 



^ 



Philadelphia Company for 
Guaranteeing Mortgages 



Land Title Building 



Philadelphia 



WILLIAM R. NICHOLSON 
President 

HENR^' P. BROWN SAMUEL C. EDMONDS 

Vice-Presidents 

OLDEST MORTGAGE GUARANTEE COMPANY' 

IN PENNSYLVANIA 

LEGAL INVESTMENTS FOR TRUST FUNDS IN PENNSYLVANIA 

Capital Assets over $5,500,000 



HALCYON 



Sv^ 



-^.n*, 









"-'■^^f't 



t3_ 



:a 



\SURE ISLAND Ml 



PLEASURE 



;«.; 



>7t^. 



Exploring 






>S1 



Tleasure Island 

Each one's own "dream place" of romance, adventure 
and thrills. C, Whitman's picture package of rich 
Chocolates is the pass'port. C, Explore and enjoy the 
contents of tray and "money bags." C, We suggest 
it as a treat for yourself or a joy 'giving gift. 

VICTOR D. SHIRER 

DRUGGIST 

Headquarters for College Pennants, Cushion Covers, Stationery, 

Souvenirs and Gifts. 



Page Three Hundred and Fo 



i^ALCYO^ 



IF YOU WISH FOR A CAREER 
SAVE EVERY WEEK AND MONTH AND YEAR 

4% Interest on Savings Fund Accounts 
2% Interest on Checking Accounts 

Kensington Trust Company 

KENSINGTON & ALLEGHENY AVENUES 

BROAD STREET OFFICE 
BROAD STREET &i ALLEGHENY AVENUE 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

The portfolio 



SWARTHMORE'S 
LITERARY MAGAZINE 



^ 



Editor: TED FETTER 
Business Manager: ANN E. THOMPSON 



For Sprin 



English 
Verticals 




$1.00 



JJolqproof Jj[Qsi(2>rg 



W'e found this design a fa\ orite abroad. Made 
up in the finest of silks, lisles and rayons. Color- 
ful, yet they pos ess that d'gritv imperative in 
the appearance of the truly well-dressed man of 
the campus. Variety enough to please the most 
exacting. 

AT MOST COCD STORES 

Holeproof Hosiery Milwaukee. Wis. 




Haddon Hall 

li ATLANTIC CITY 



In the very center of things 

on the beach 

and the Boardwalk. 



'Dual Trio" Radio Concert 

every Tuesday evening — 

Tune in on WPG at 9. 



^< 99 




STAND out like personal friends in the 
thoughts of those who love to go down to 
the sea for rest or play — their simple, friendly 
hospitality has so graced every service for so 
many years. 

Every season ot the year has its round ot 
sports. In Summer, the finest Sea Bathing, 
Tennis, Yachting and Fishing; in Winter, 
Horseback Riding on the Beach; and all the 
year — Golf, Aviation and the fascinating activi- 
ties of the Boardwalk. 



^^ American Plan Only f Always Open 



Illustrated Folder on Request 

LEEDS AND LIPPINCOTT COMPANY 




John Hanna & Sons 

General Contractors 



Law Building 



Chester, Pa. 



^ Good Appearance is 
readily attained at 
moderate cost if you 
deal at the right place. 
Suits & Top Coatj 
$35.00 and upward. 

JACOB REED'S SONS I 

J424-26 CHESTNUT ST. 
PHILADELPHIA 



Frank Maselli 

COLLEGE BARBER 

Park Avenue 
Swarthmore 



Lear & Worrilow 

Insurance - Real Estate 
Crozer Building, Chester, Pa. 



Creth & Sullivan, Inc. 

INSURANCE 

2 lO SOUTH FOURTH STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 

MARSHALL P. SULLIVAN, '97, President FRANCIS W. D'OLIER, '07, Treasurer 



S^SZcyon" 



WALTER T. KARCHER 
and LIVINGSTON SMITH 

ARCHITECTS 



1520 LOCUST STREET 



PHILADELPHIA 



WELL, CANCIOATES, CrBT OUTA/>/0 
SPREAD youa STUFF [ M/^(Ce 'Eri 
HEfKLlZE THAT THIS IS TH£ Qiq- 
OPPORTUn/ITY OP A L(FETI(ME' 




Three Hundred 




NOTHNAGLE 
& ROSER 

"\\^g Can Paint Anything" 
PAPER HANGING 



AUTO GLASS WORK 
A SPECIALTY 



600 Sproul Street 

CHESTER 



Scoflfssue 
Products 




/ 



Sli Re^DRIES 



R\r>F M\BK KCU 



This trademark identifies and distinguishes products made 
by Scott Paper Company. Qualities of softness, cleanness 
and absorbency which you iind in ScotTissue Towels and 
ScotTissue toilet paper are there because of the presence of 
millions upon millions of thirsty fibres. In the home, school, 
office or factory — wherever comfort, convenience, hygiene 
and economy are appreciated, ScotTissue Products are used. 

Scott Paper Company, Chester, Pa. 




Three Hundred and 




I^^lcyon" 



Commercial Auto Bodies 




Model 179X Bettermetl-Betterwood Panel Body Mounted on International L. D. Chassis 

"York Bodies" are designed and built 

with same Comfort and Convenience 

as afforded by high priced Sedan 

Pleasure Cars. 

Special Designs and Sizes. 



YORK BODY CORPORATION 

''Builders of Better Bodies ^ 
YORK, PA. 



^ALCYO^ 



The Night of the Formal 



'Twas the night of the formal 

And all down the hall 
Each girl was awaiting 

Her telephone call. 
Some stockings were hung 

By a window -with care. 
Still hopelessly wet, 

So she'd borrowed a pair. 
One nervously strutted. 

And powdered her nose, 
Another affected 

A state of repose. 
When all of a sudden 

Arose quite a clatter — 
The telephone rang, 

A most serious matter. 
All sprang toward the object 

Then gasped in suspense; 
And so it continued 

With atmosphere tense. 
The air reeked with perfume, 

While powder and rouge 
Fell on everyone's bureaus 

In quite a deluge. 
One girl prayed for dampness 

To bring out her wave. 



Another for drv air 

Her marcel to save. 
Some popular damsels 

Did not wish to go 
Except for the favors 

Which lessened their woe. 
"Do you s'pose he will like me?" 

One timid girl said. 
"Of course," said her room-mate 

Nodding her head. 
I waited and waited. 

Til everyone went, 
And it seemed half the evening 

Was already spent. 
He finally called but 

I told him to wait 
Though I'd been all attired 

Since a quarter to eight. 
I thought, as I started. 

How lucky boys were 
To miss all this bustle 

And usual stir. 
But I know that I'd miss it 

If I were a boy 
For without it each formal 

Would lose half its iov. 



The 
Swarthmore National Bank 

Swarthmore, Penna. 



Capital 
Surplus 



$50,000 
$100,000 



STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 



OFFICERS 

E. B. Temple, President J. E. Ramsey, Vice President C. Percy Webster, Vice President 

Elric S. Sproat, Cashier Harold Ogram, Assistant Cashier 

DIRECTORS 

Edward B. Temple Garrett E. Smedley John F. Murray J. Everton Ramsey C. Percy Webster 

Joseph E. Haines John W. Pittock Joseph Swain Elric S. Sproat 

Wm. E. Kistler Wm. H. Thatcher Haldv M. Crist 



^\LCYO^ 



McNeill 
Construction Company 

Contractors and Builders 



Schaff Building 
1505 Race Street, Philadelphia 

Southern Office 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

Nissen Building 

ESTIMATES FURNISHED FOR ALL CLASSES OF BUILDING 



Builders of 

WORTH HALL PHI SIGMA KAPPA LODGE 

DELTA UPSILON LODGE KAPPA SIGMA LODGE 
PHI DELTA THETA LODGE 



Page Three Hundred and Twelve 



gHALCYON 



Bonds for Investment 

High Grade Railroad, Public Utility and Industrial Bonds 
suitable for careful investors always on our list. 

INQUIRIES ARE INVITED 



FARRISM & COMPANY 

Members of New York and Philadelphia Stock Exchanges 
New York Cotton Exchange 

Morris L. Parrish Percival Parrish, 'qfa George R. McClellan 
Alfred E. Norris Frederic R. Kirkland Harold A. Nehrbas Geo. E. Nehrbas 

212 S. Fifteenth St. 25 Broadway 

PHILADELPHIA NEW YORK 

OFFICES also at HARRISBURG AND READING, PA. 
PHONES: Philadelphia — Bell, Pennypacker 8600; Keystone, Race 7851. New York — Whitehall 7500 



CHESTER TIMES 


THE 


CHESTER, PENNA. 


WALLINGFORD 




GARAGE 




We print Y. M. C. A. Handbooks 


WALLINGFORD, PA. 


for Swarthmore College students. 


<■ 


Students find our Job Printing 
Department supplies their needs 


WILLIAM D. INGRAM 
PROPRIETOR 



Bartlett Tours Co. 



'Travel Free From Care" 



FOREIGN TOURS 

Small Parties 

Select membership 

Reasonable rates 



STEAMSHIP TICKETS 

To all parts of the World 

Europe, Bermuda, Cuba, etc. 

Choice cabins, lowest rates 



CRUISES 

Mediterranean 
.Around the World 
West Indies, etc. 



1415 LOCUST STREET, PHILADELPHIA 



HALCYON 



The 

Franklin Fourth Street 
National Bank 



Capital, Surplus and Profits 
over 

$24,750,000 



* 



OFFICERS 













Chairman of the Board 
















J. R. McAllister 
















President 
















E. F. SHANBACKER 






w 


K 


. HARDT 






Vice Presidents 


J. WM 


. HARDT 


J. 


A. 


HARRIS, 


Jr. 




Cashier 
R. J. CLARK 

•*• 

Main Office 


W. M. 


HUMPHREYS 






J 


41 


6' 


1418 Chestnut 


Street 





Downtown Office 
131 ' 141 South Fourth Street 

West Philadelphia Office 
Thirty Second Street & Lancaster Avenue 




Page Three Hundred and Fifteen 




TiALCYO^ 



FOR ALL, ALL THE TIME 

Hotel Adelphia Restaurants 



PHILADELPHIA 



FOUNTAIN ROOM 

Open — Noon Till Midnight 

A Ladies' Tea Room 

All foods prepared by women 
For Luncheon and Afternoon Tea 

Children Half Price 



COFFEE GRILL 

Open — b a. m. Till g p. m. 
For the Business Woman or K4an "Short on Time" 

Quick Counter or Table Service 

Children Hal/ Price 



FRENCH ROOM 

Open b a. m. Till i a m. 

A La Carte, Club Meal Service 

Breakfast 75c. Luncheon qoc. 

Dinner Platters $1.25 up 

Children Half Price 



THE 



Roof Garden 

FOR 

Luncheon, Dinner 
and Supper 



CHILDREN 

are served at half prices 



DANCING {s^^^M 
♦ 

The Fountain Room 

FOR 

Light Luncheons 
and Tea 






■;) 



HOTEL ADELPHIA 

NEAREST EVERYTHING 

CHESTNUT AT 13TH 

PHILADELPHIA 



Three Hundred and 




DODGE and NASH 


Spruce IOZ76 Pennypacker 5973 

no TO 


AUTOMOBILES 


CHARLES & SONS 




13 15-17 Sansom Street 


Graham Brothers 
Trucks 


PHILADELPHIA 

for expert service in beauty culture 

NESTLE CIRCULINE 




PERMANENT WAVING 




Marcel or Round Wave 


?.,^>^>jS^^j 


A STAFF OF, MOST EFFICIENT EMPLOYEES 


J. Harry Swope 

5 th and Main Streets 


COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

A WIFE 


Walnut, 5th to 6th Streets 


WHO PAYS HER HUSBAND'S 
HONEST DEBTS 


DARBY. PENNA. 





Charming Period Furniture 

J. B.VAN SGIVER CO. takes pride in having supplied, from time to time. 

Furniture and Furnishings in whole or in part for various interiors of 

Swarthmore College, and for Fraternity Houses on the Campus. 

PROBABLY no other store in this part of the United States has furnished 
so many Homes, Club Houses, Hotels, Hospitals and other institutions. 
One reason is that this great ten-acre establishment has thousands of 
Suites and Pieces of Furniture from which to make selections, with all 
Accessories for the home — Rugs, Floor Coverings, Linoleums, Draperies, 
Lamps, Clocks and Bedding. When the architecture of the Home or other 
building is unusual, we make Furniture to fit the requirements. The great 
amount of Furniture we manufacture and the immense volume of our sales 
insure values that we believe are absolutely incomparable. 




cive 




7v\ARKET ST. FERRY. CAMDEN. N.J. 



JOHN T. SCOTT, JR., President EUGENE WALTER, Vice President 

JOHN M. DOTTERER, Vice President HARRY S. POLLOCK, Casliier 

JOSEPH S. WEAVER, Asst. Cashier 



SOUTHWESTERN 
NATIONAL BANK 



Commercial and 
Savings Accounts 



BROAD AND SOUTH STREETS 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



COURTESY 



SERVICE 




?^\LCYON 



When you think ot Insurance — think of us 

THE F. BARUCH AGENCY 

INSURANCE 
IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 



529 CHESTNUT STREET : : PHILADELPHIA 

(OPPOSITE INDEPENDENCE HALL) 
Phone, Lombard 2258 




BELL— WALNUT 8990, 8991, 8992 



FELIX SPATOLA & SONS 

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

The Year Round 

Hotels, Clubs and Institutions Supplied 



Reading Terminal Vlarket 



BIOREN & CO. 

Established 1865 

BANKERS 



4 1 o Chestnut Street 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



Government, Municipal 

Railroad and Public Utility 

BONDS 



Members of New York and 
Philadelphia Stock Exchanges 



WALTER H. LIPPINCOTT 

Class of 1 899 
Member of the firm 



E. RUSSELL PERKINS 

Class of 191 1 
Associated with the firm 



Ptigi Three Hundred and Tuenty 



jmA^LCYON 





opaldinq 

ciuimnienl 




= 1 Send for 1 = 



1210 Chestnut Street 
PHILADELPHIA 



HERE'i- AA/ -^ Of -A-PA6-e 
AD. ALSO, My EXPENSE 
Accou/vr OF -5(^36.00 



My, BUDDY, 

Rather woric 

OfsJ A SALARY? 




Gasoline Service Company 

AT THE SIGN OF THE TRAFFIC COP 

STOP FOR 



GAS AND OIL 



NINTH STREET AT SPROUL 



CHESTER, PA. 





Chester 385 i 




THE MAY STORE 


COMPLIMENTS 

OF A 


Women's Ready to Wear 


FRIEND 


♦ 




320 

MARKET STREET 




CHESTER, PA. 




Three Hundred and T 




HALCYON 



■m!^^-^_^_. 



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P<?.?e Three Hundred and Twenty-twc 



jmALCYO^ 



Alice at Swarthmore 

"What is the name of this club?" said Alice ingeniously as she approached Parrish. 

"That," said the split pea, "is Parrish Hall." 

"Oh, don't be silly," giggled Alice, "It doesn't look a bit like a Paris shawl." 

"My goodness," replied the exponent of the 57 varieties, "can't you understand plain 
English? I said, Parrish Hall." 

"Oh," said Alice, and her eyes widened to mere slits, "now that you mention it, it does 
look something like a parasol, but I should think it would be pretty hard to carry it with 
you." 

"You don't carry it with you, goofy," remonstrated the split pea, "The girls live there, 
you carry the memory with you." 

"But what do they do?" queried Alice. 

"Oh, talk about the men." (As a matter of fact the split pea wronged the girls because 
they talk about lots besides the men. Honestly they do. Clothes for instance, and all that 
sort of thing.) 

"Oh, are there men at the college?" said Alice. By this time she was feeling a little 
embarrassed for asking so many questions, but she really wanted to know. 

"Yes," said the vegetable soup, (for a potato and an onion had been added to him). 
"There are men at the college and also a few boys from the east." 

"Tee hee!" sniggered Alice, "you can't fool me. You're an open scholar from Indian- 
apolis!" (You see she wasn't so dumb after all.) 

The vegetable soup swelled considerably as he replied, with a smile which wreathed his 
whole face, "Wide open." 



The Ninth Bank and Trust Company 



FRONT STREET 

AT NORRIS 




ALLEGHENY AVENUE 
AT KENSINGTON 



PHILADELPHIA 



Resources over $20,000,000.00 



OFFICERS 



IRA W. BARNES, President 



JOHN G. SONNEBORN, 

Vice-President 

J. WILSON STEINMETZ, 

Vice-President and Treasurer 

CHARLES B. CONN, 

Secretary and Asst. Treasurer 

ABRAM S. ASHWORTH, 

Asst. Sec"y and Asst. Treas. 



WILLIAM R. LEUTE, 

Assistant Treasurer 

HARRY A. MANKIN, 

Trust Officer 

GUY C. BELL, 

Title Officer 

CHARLES A. LIEBIG. 

Assistant Title Officer 



THE BANK OF SERVICE 



^\LCYd^ 



LITHOGRAPHIC 
ADVERTISING 



Ketterlinus Lithographic 
Manufacturing Company 

Philadelphia 



New York 



Chicago 



Boston 



Page Three Hundred and Tuenty-four 



TiALCYO^ 



^^ Decorate with Artistic Lighting Equipment ^ 




QUALITY LIGHTING FIXTURES. LAMPS 

Visit our salesroom — see what beautiful things 
we have to make your home more charming 

BIDDLE-GAUMER CO. 



3846-56 LANCASTER AVE. PHILADELPHIA 


Olliarter i^nn&t Qllntljtng 


The 


The Indubitable Choice of College Men 


NG^ENEUK 


ff) Suits and 
g^§jj\ opcoats 
g^^^4 $40 -$45 -$50 


T^A ROOM 


1 20 Park Avenue 

SWARTHMORE, PA. 


l^^^^Cgn '^"'^ '^'^^^ assortment 




"^^^ft'^y of haberdashery will 


Just a Big Friendly House 


^^tS^^^^ enable you to dress 


Next Best to Home 


/^v|^ correctly in every detail 




/^^pfi 


DELICIOUS LUNCHEONS 


H— iWBti Ill>t1tt h Jt K ltI>1*1T 




ll— |JEI1 j J*: tHHJUSilf ITA y 


The Club Dinner that Satisfies 


i/F~?-\| College Men s 




r^^ APPAREL 


Chicken and Waffle 

Supper 
Every Sunday Night 


Clothiers : Haberdasherys : Hatters 
Formalwear : Footwear : Sportwear 


3713 SPRUCE STREET 


CATERING 


U. of P. Campus 




"Merchandise that Expresses Personality" 


Phone. Swarchmore 60 W 



When You Travel 



You can save yourself endless annoyance 
by carrying travelers" cheques. They 
combine the advantages of checks and 
money and eliminate the disadvantages 
of both. 

You can get them at 



NORTH PHILADELPHIA TRUST CO. 

Broad Street and Germantown Avenue (above Erie Ave.) 

PHILADELPHIA 



April 24th. 

We had a fire drill last night. I was already for it because 
Bob told me he was going to have one. He said he wanted to see 
how the co-eds looked when they were really themselves. But 
Bob didn't see me as I really am, because I didn't put my hair in 
crimpers, or smear my face with complexion salve, until after the 
fire drill. And I mean I look quite 99-44/100% better without 
crimpers and zinc ointment. 

April 26th. 

It was a wonderful spring day today, one of the early spring 
days when the halls are lined with fussers looking lovingly into "^ ^°°^ ''"'beaer**'"" ^' "^"^ 
each other's eyes. I won't mention names like Moose, and Mac, 

and Herb, and Pollv, and Ted, and Bob and his latest flame, but anyway they were all 
there. Doc and I started to look lovingly into each other's eyes in the halls, and then 
we decided we could do it better in Crum Woods. So we went out in the Crum Woods. So 
then we had to go very far to get away from the rest of the college. Even the members of 
Student Conduct and the wild-eyed Woolman woman haters couldn't resist the call of the 
Crum. And Doc was so intreeged that he wanted me to wear his D.U. pin, and he said I was 
the only girl he had ever loved, so of course I didn't believe him, as I know he has loved 
lots of others — but really, I don't see why a girl with the good looks and the charm that I 
have shouldn't wear a D.U. pin, so I said yes I would. Anyway, a kiss on the hand makes 
you feel good, but a D.U. pin lasts longer. Oh — yes — I forgot we stumbled over Batsie and 
Abie eating their supper out in the woods. I am wondering why the rest of the couples don't 
have their supper in the woods, too, and keep them company. 



veiily-stx 



De Haven & Townsend 



Established 1874 



MEMBERS 

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 

PHILADELPHIA STOCK EXCHANGE 

52 Broadway 

New York 

14 1 5 Walnut Street 

Philadelphia 




ee Hundred and Titenty 




i^ALCYO^ 



Parker's Music Store 

1 1 East State Street 
Media, Pa. 

// it is musical, U'e have it 



The Orthophonic Victrola, Musical Instruments, 
Strings and supplies 

Call Media 83 1 



Ye Olde Print Shoppe 

Gleave L. Baker 



PRINTING 

in all its BRANCHES 

State Street & South Avenue 
Media, Pa. 



WM. H. W. QUICK & BRO., Inc. 

8 South Fortieth Street 
PHILADELPHIA 

SPECIALISTS IN ALL CLASSES OF 
WEST PHILADELPHIA PROPERTIES 




. ^\ I //// 



Here it is, folks 1 A rug that takes the scrub and moisture, like water from a duck's back, 

out of "home-work!" There's nothing like As easy to clean as a plate-glass window! 
Sandura — the only felt-base rug with the 

Sanduralac surface. This magic film of If your dealer can't show you that Sandura 

Sanduralac — transparent, sparkling, perma- line, we'll be glad to mail you a pattern 

nently beautiful — repels dirt and grit, grease chart direct. 

SANDURA COMPANY, Inc.— Finance Building— Philadelphia 



JOHN S. CLEMENT (08). President 



RALPH G. JACKSON (ob). Vice-President 



^~ W I ( ^SANDURALAC aAC9t/£«> SURFACE D°°M %— ^^ 

REQUIRE NO SCRUBBING 




ee Hundred and Tu 




SWARTHMORE PHOENIX 



Alumni 

You are interested in Swarthmore, 
its development, its teams, its activi- 
ties. You are interested in your 
classmates. The Swarthmore Phoenix 
is the best medium for securing 
accurate and up-to-date information 
concerning these subjects. 

Undergraduates 

If you vs^ould like to know^ Sw^arth- 
more's Past and Present, and ii you 
w^ould like to show^ that you are 
supporting Swarthmore activities — 

Support your College Paper. 



MARY T. SULLIVAN, '28, Editor-in-Chief 
HAROLD S. BERRY, '28, Business Manager 



Subscription for College Year 

$2.00 



^ALCYO^ 




imAluCYO^^ 



Incorporated March lo, 1812 



The Pennsylvania Company 

For Insurances on Lives and 
Granting Annuities 

(Trust and Safe Deposit Company) 



Packard Building 

S. E. Corner Fifteenth & Chestnut Streets 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Downtown Office 

517 Chestnut Street 



Cable Address, "Penco" 



Member Federal Reserve System 



DEPOSIT ACCOUNTS OF CORPORATIONS AND INDIVIDUALS SOLICITED 
CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT ISSUED TRUSTS OF ALL KINDS EXECUTED 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES RENTED 



^HALCYON 



t^OW hOVS. HERE'S VOUR CH/\NCE! 
6KING- 'En IN DEf\Vi OP. ALIVE'.! 
DON'T 5HOOT TILL VQV 5EE THE 
WHITES OF THEIR POCKETS l! 




Grace Stewart 

GOWNS 

1 1 3 South 1 9th Street 
PHILADELPHIA 

Rittenhouse 963'; 



BINDER 



BUILDING 



Ladies' and Children's 
HAIRCUTTING SHOP 

35 S. 13 th Street 

Cut Over 56,000 Heads of Hair in 7926 

10.000 More than in 1925 

Were You One? If Not, Why Not? 

ONLY 50c. 

BINDER HAIRCUTTERS 

ALL FIRST CLASS 



-0..^ 






C^^ PHOTOGRAPH 




«^C4^ 




IC S U PPLI E S 



1804 CHESTNUT STREET 



RH I LAD ELPH I A 



CAPITAL, $400,000 



SURPLUS, $700,000 



The Northern National Bank 




Main Office 
Germantown Ave., 7th & Dauphin Streets 

Germantown Office 
Chelten Avenue, near Chew Street 



Three Hundred and Thir 




HALCYON 



135 years 
of experience 



When the Insurance Company of North America was organ' 

ized, in 1792, insurance needs were simple and few. Today 

they are many and complex. But they are met efficiently and 

economically by North America policies and service. 

Long experience, an equally long record of prompt and fair 
claim adjustment and the strength of a great organization 
are behind every North America policy on your property risks. 




INSURANCE COMPANY OF 
NORTH AMERICA 

PHILADELPHIA 

and the 

INDEMNITY INSURANCE COMPANY OF 
NORTH AMERICA 




I^ALCYOT^ 



Compliments 

of 



Worth Steel Com^pany 



CLAYMONT, DEL. 




J^ALCYO^ 



1 



THE 



Swarthmore College Bookstore 



Maintained by the College for the Convenience 
of Students and Faculty 



Basement of Parrish Hall 



Phone — Swarthmore 200 



Metal Sales Company 


Benjamin H. Shoemaker 


Nickel Silver — Phosphor Bronze 
Brass and Copper 


Incorporated 

Since 1837 


133 Arch Street Philadelphia, Pa. 


PLATE GLASS 




WINDOW GLASS 




STORE FRONTS 


COMPLIMENTS 


MIRRORS 


OF 




BEECHWOOD 


•9- •9- 




205-211 N. Fourth Street 




PHILADELPHIA 



j^ALCYON 



CECIL F. SHALLCROSS, President 



T. MAGILL PATTERSON, Secretary 



HARRY A. CARL, Asst. Secretary 



1825 — 1927 

The 

Pennsylvania Fire Insurance Company 

CHARTER PERPETUAL 

Over a Hundred Years Old 
4- 

Office: 508-510 Walnut Street 

Philadelphia 

Directors 



CECIL F. SHALLCROSS 
JOSEPH WAYNE. Jr. 

J. R. McAllister 



GEORGE H. FRAZIER 
MORRIS L. CLOTHIER 
L. H. KINNARD 



HENRY I. BROWN 
WM. W. BODINE 
J. H. CUMMINGS 



May 1st. 

I walked very slowly down the asphaltam with Miss Bronc today. She says she remem- 
bered the May Day a long time ago — about 50 yrs. when she first came here. I like Miss 
Bronc a lot, and I really mean I'm sorry she won't be back next year, because the people who 
have a pull with her will miss her. And I had an aunt and several uncles go here that she 
was very fond of, and so I don't believe I will take French any more. 

May 4th. 

Really, for a girl who has the poise and sensitive feelings I have, today was an awful 
day. The Deans actually tried to tell me that I was in the wrong. It seems I am not sup- 
posed to walk along Crum Woods at night with my boy friends. The Womens Stude Gov't 
tried to tell me, but they got discouraged, and turned me over to the Dean with the blue 
eyes and the blue necktie to match. I was so intreeged with the blue necktie that I had to 
laugh. In his presents, I have to laugh that a man with such a prettv blue necktie could say 
such intelligent sounding words. But he didn't appreciate my laughing, and I was in an 
awful quandary. Really it was the result of fate. And so then he told me to talk to Dean 
Blanshard, and Dean Blanshard was so sincere that I really began to be sorrv. So now I don't 
think I will walk in Crum Woods again any more, because she really has persuaded me not to. 
I might be a bad example for the other members of the college who haven't the really noble 
ideals I have. 



Page Three Hundred and Thirty-si 




Theodore E. Nickles 

Realtor and Mortgage Broker 

1130-32 West Lehigh Avenue 
Philadelphia 



S^ALCYO^ 



HARRY E. THOMSON 



INCORPORATED 



CONVEYANCING 
REAL ESTATE 



AND 



INSURANCE 



2521 FRANKFORD AVENUE 



t 



FUNDS FOR MORTGAGES 

ANY AMOUNT 

GROUND FOR SALE— NORTHEAST SECTION 

PHILADELPHIA AGENTS FOR 

PITTSBURG UNDERWRITERS AND SUPERIOR 

FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 



Bell Phone, Regent 0600 
Keystone, East 7226 



S^ALCYO^ 



ESTABLISHED 1818 







tttbrnrti^ yurni0l^i«5 moat&. 



MADISON AVENUE COR. FORTV-FOURTH STREET 
NEW YORK 



Clothes for School 

and College a 

Specialty 

Send for Brooks's Miscellany 



BOSTON PALM BEACH NEWPORT 

LITTLE BUILDING PLAZA BUILDING AUOHAIN fiUILOING 
Tamo-T con Botisto Couh't Roio 220 BiLiii^^i a.ibu. 



/s 








S. S. FULMER & SON 

2707-2709-271 1 

GERMANTOWN AVENUE 

PHILADELPHIA 

OPEN FRIDAY AND SATURDAY EVENINGS 





Compliments of 


COMPLIMENTS 


JOHN S. MORRIS & CO. 


FROM 

NEW YORK AND 


Fine Butter 


KENTUCKY 






27 South Water Street 




PHILADELPHIA 



S^ALCYO^ 



May 5th. 

I stood in the hall a long time today talking to Mr. Ross, and I was so intreeged I didn't 
see all my friends go by and wink at me. He is really too cute looking for a professor. And 
then I bumped into Mr. Klees going down to the Post Office, and we talked a long time. 
A lot of my friends went by, and I hope they were impressed. Only of course I was so in- 
treeged listening to Mr. Klees' New England and Old England accent that I didn't notice 
them. It's really the result of fate. So now I feel well educated, and I only hope Prexie and 
Brooksie and Waltie will get some more cute looking professors to improve mv mind next 
year. 

May 10th. 

I haven't written for a long time, because I'm really quite annoyed with mvself. I was 
running around the gym and I threw the basketball at 
someone, and missed, and it w^ent thru a window, and 
broke it, and now the young men of the college call 
me hefty, and really, I mean I am not hefty, but quite a 
sweet young thing. And tomorrow when I go on the 
house party, I will prove I am not hefty. I will also 
leave letters in the College mail for Bob, and Pete, and 
Ray — telling them how sorry I am I couldn't keep 
their dates, but now they can go out with their real 

girls. "I was so intreegeed' 



1 


i 


^M. 



Strath Haven Inn 



SWARTHMORE, PENNSYLVANIA 



Always Open 



STRATH HAVEN TEA ROOM 



Telephone — Swarthmore 68o 



|^\LCYO^ 



JOHN E. SJOSTROM CO., Inc. 



Cabinetmakers 



i7iq North Tenth Street 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



West End Trust Company 

Broad Street and South Penn Square 
PHILADELPHIA 

Capital and Surplus Total Resources 

$4,000,000.00 $25,000,000.00 

CHECKING AND SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 

Acts as Executor Administrator Guardian Trustee 

Manages Real Estate Collects Rents, etc. 

Money Loaned on Approved Collateral 

SAFE DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT 

Sells Foreign Exchange Letters of Credit Travelers Cheques 



CHESTER 
CANDY KITCHEN 

THE HOUSE OF QUALITY 



HOME-MADE CANDIES AND 
ICE CREAM 

526 MARKET STREET 
CHESTER, P.A. 

GEORGE N. VARLAN 




D. D. LEWIS 

Successor to 

E. P. TIMMONS 
Wholesale Commission 

Fish and Oyster Dealer 

DOCK STREET WHARF 
PHILADELPHIA 



Three Hundred and Forty-one 




I^ALCYO^ 



Strawbridge & Clothier 

Philadelphia 



OTicfeijam 



Thoroughbred Clothing for College Men 



Suits 



Overcoats 



Hats 



Shoes 



parfaara %tt Jfrocfeg 



Frocks of Distinction and Personality for Young Women 



At 



Strawbridge & Clothier's 



Exclusively in Philadelphia 




I^ALCYO^ 



BICKMORE 
GREENHOUSES 

WALLINGFORD 

DELAWARE CO., PA. 

An assorted line of Potted Plants and Cut 

Flowers. Bouquets and Decorations for 

weddings and other occasions. Funeral 

Designs. We deliver anywhere 

Phone, Chester 2087-W 



The 


Phone. Swarthmore it>4M 


A SWEETE - SHOPPE FOR COLLEGE 


Yellow Bowl Tea Room 


STUDENTS 




SWARTHMORE 


606 Sproul St., Chester, Pa. 


SWEETE -SHOPPE 




1 3 Park Avenue 




SWARTHMORE, PA. 


Luncheon 11.30 - 2.30 


.A.bbott'5 Ice Cream Sodas Apollo Chocolates 




Special orders for Birthdav and 


Dinner 5.30 - 7.30 


Wedding Cakes 


Philadelphia's Show Place of 


Member of 
American Telegraphic Florist Association 


Favored Fashions 




EVIBICK'S 


JOSEPH W. BARTOW 

FLORIST 


for things worth while 




DRESSES COATS HATS 


Cut Flowers and Funeral Designs 


SPORTS- WEAR LINGERIE 






Fourth and Edgemont A\ enue 


1620 Chestnut Street 


Chester, Pa. 



Organized iSzq 



Charter Perpetual 



The 



Franklin Fire Insurance 
Company of Philadelphia 

42 1 Walnut Street 



CHARLES L. TYNER. President 



Fire and Allied Branches of Insurance 

Service Unexcelled 



MARSHALL P. SULLIVAN, Agent 

•210 South Fourth Street Philadelphia, Penna. 



Page Three Hundred and Forly-fo 



^alcyon" 



Ask Me Another — Quizz Number Thirteen 

1 — What is "mal de mer"? 

2 — In what battle did generals Montcalm and Wolfe die? 

3 — Is an armadillo a musical instrument, an animal, or a fruit? 

4 — Who invented the submarine? 

5 — Is Orang-utan the name of a countrv, an animal, or a malady? 

6 — What is the difference between a river and an estuary? 

7 — What is the "Maid of the Mist"? 

8 — How does the kangaroo carry her young? 

9 — Who started the college? 
10 — If Chester gin retails at $2.00 a quart, how much is Lysol? 
11 — Who runs the college? 
12 — Who supplies Wharton with cigarettes? 

13 — What islands does one pass going to Bermuda, and which way are they going? 
14 — What do the following have in common? Allie Ward, Ell Burdsall, and J. R. Hayes. 
15 — What is the difference between a college meal and one at the tea-room? 
16 — What is the seating capacity of the library? 
17 — What is an open scholar? 
18 — What is the motto of Swarthmore College? 
19 — Why is Dr. Brooks a Democrat? 
20 — What did the Dean say to the President, and why? 
21 — What is meant bv a three point? 
22 — In what building on the front campus does every good Swarthmore student spend most of 

his time? 
23 — Why do we have Honors Work? 
24— What is a Welsh Eisteddfod? 

(^Answers on page 364^ 



Higher Education 



Our setting consists of one of those drear holes surrounded by four walls in the upper 
regions of Parrish, which for want of a better name we call a class-room. 

At the front of the room stands the usual nondescript desk, bespeaking much, much 
better days. Suspended from the ceiling directly above the desk is a flying trapeze. Travelling 
rings, regularly spaced, hang about the room. A horizontal bar is erected at one side of the 
room, while rows of Indian clubs and exercising weights decorate the opposite wall. 

A motley group of the younger set are seated in the scattered chairs. The front row is 
composed of freshmen. That they are freshmen is evidenced by the fact that they alone of 
the room's occupants are busily poring over their notes. The more rational-appearing beings 
sitting toward the rear of the room — that is, the upper classmen — are either fussing with the 
young lady in the next seat, or engrossed in the daily paper. 

Sound of trumpets and hautboys. An ordinance is shot off within. 

Enter the professor carrying an over-night bag of ostrich skin. He removes his cretonne 
lounging-robe, and expertly flips the trench helmet he wears onto the gas jet. He receives a 
deafening ovation as he stands before the class garbed in pea-green tights, mauve jersey, and 
flame colored stockings. 

(Coutinued on page 364^ 



Three Hundred and 




Sm^LCYON 



Union National Bank 

"Where Arch Street Crosses Third" 
In Philadelphia 



To you students who are going out 
into the business world we recom- 
mend the advantages to be obtained 
by a proper banking connection. 

Our banking service in this com- 
munity extends back over a period 
of seventy years. 



J. S. McCULLOCH 

President 



HENRY F. MITCHELL 

Vice-President 

FREDERICK FAIRLAMB 

Vice-Pres. and Cashier 



0. STUART WHITE 

Vice-President 




J. GEO. KRATTENMAKER 

Assistant Cashier 



JOHN W. FRANK 

Assistant Cashier 

B. C. WASHINGTON 

Trust Officer 



Three Hundred a?id Forty-sh 




Jm^LCYON 



JOHN SPENCER 



INCORPORATED 



PR I NT I NG • . • LI THOGR APH I NO 
BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS 



517 EDGMONT AVENUE 



CHESTER, PENNA. 



George Haydock Brooke, '93 



SENIOR PARTNER 



WILLIAMS & WALTON 

416-420 Walnut Street '.■ Philadelphia, Pa. 



INSURANCE 



HARRY G. INNIS 

MEN'S HATTER 
and FURNISHER 




ISalcyo^ 



MAKE EDUCATION COMPLETE 

Knowledge increases money earning possibilities. 

The ability to handle money and education assures a 
successful career. 

Knowledge is power — Financial growth, an achieve- 
ment. 

The combination that wins — Education and Thrift. 

The Book for Freshman, Sophomore and Graduate — 

THE BANK BOOK 



The Media Title & Trust Company 

MEDIA, PENNA. 

also 

Office : 69th Street Terminal 
Settlement Rooms : 6936 Market Street UPPER DARBY, PA. 





DREWES & ERNSl 




MANUFACTURERS OF 


COMPLIMENTS 


Durable 


OF A 

FRIEND 


Paint Products 




309 CHERRY STREET 




Philadelphia 



BELL, WALbJUT 4844-45 



KEYSTONE, RACE 3843 



HOTELS 



T. FRED. STANDEVEN 
Fruits and Vegetables 

READING TERMINAL MARKET 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

<. CLUBS ♦ INSTITUTIONS ♦ 



DINING CARS 



Page Three Hundred and Forty-eight 



J^aZcyo^ 



B 



Filling Station 



WATER, GAS 

AND 

AIR FREE 



Chester, Pa. 



B-Sub 



CHESTER'S 
LEADING THEATRES 

Direction Stanley Company 
of America 

The Stanley 
The Washington 

First Showing 

in Delaware County of 

Feature Photo Plays 

Matinees daily, 1.30 
Evenings, 7 and 9 



New Ideas in College Clothes 



New fabrics that we designed 
particularly for college men 
. . . new styles that express the 
true campus atmosphere . . . 
cut and bench-tailored to your 
indix'idual measure . . . fitted 
faultlessly to your form . . . 
priced the Edward way, which 
saves the middleman's profit 
for vou. 




$28.75 ^ $38.75 




The Edward Tailoring Co. , Inc. 

S. E. Corner i6th and Market Sts. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Edward clothes 

MADE FOR YOU 



don't PLILL -rHf\T SOB 1 
STuf^P^ M/^.APVERT/SERlJ 
Q^TTBK. CrR\H i^rMO jig 

VOU'li£ NOT THE i 
OiVlY Sl/CKER ON U 


^ 


M 


iA 


1 


M 


ll 


1 



^ALCYO^ 



Everybody goes to the 

WM. PENN 

t 



6'^nd 

SPROUL STREETS 
CHESTER, PA. 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF A 

FRIEND 



Hardware Store 

N. Walter Suplee 



Swarthmore 



Pennsylvania 



PAPER BOXES 

FOLDING AND SET-UP 

Bell Phone '^ Keystone 

SPRUCE 4087 fe RACE 6291 

NATIONAL 
METAL EDGE BOX CO. 

Callowhill at Thirteenth Street 



THE 

Swarthmore Garage 

Dartmouth Avenue 

HUDSON - ESSEX 

MOTOR CARS 

Always Open Car Storage 

Phone 5q6 

N. SANDBERG 8z SON 



^HALCYO^ 



WALTER STOKES & CO. 



INVESTMENT SECURITIES 



« 



104 South Fifth Street 
Philadelphia 



Bell : Lombard 6969-72 



Keystone: Main 11 14 



Choosing a Career 

Is a man's size job 
Solve it in a big way! 

The business of Life Insurance 
is so big that it Satisfies 



There is much to learn, but 
you can EARN WELL while 
you are learning. You have 
individual freedom and a dig- 
nified vocation as a future. 

Call on 
W. R. HARPER, General Agent 

.ETNA 

LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

718 Widener Bldg., Philadelphia 

Bell phone: RITcenhouse 0150-1-2 



Send a Basket 
of Luscious Fruit 

Many of our patrons have with 
us a standing order for a weekly 
basket of fruit to be sent to their 
homes or to those away at school. 

These orders contain only the 
finest selected fruits, so arranged 
by our experts that they provide 
freshly ripened selections for 
each day throughout the week. 

HALli3WELL 

Broad below Chestnut Street 
Philadelphia 



jmALCYO^ 



"Colonial Old Method" 


FLOWERS-B Y-WIRE 


— A Roofing Tin of unexcelled quality, 
produced by experts to uphold the in- 
tegrity of that most satisfactory of all 
roofs — the Good Tin Roof. 

CONSULT YOUR ROOFER 


HART'S Flower Shop 

(Member Florists' Telegraph Association) 


FABLE & COMPANY 


21 East Seventh Street 


Incorporated 
PH 1 L ADELPH I A 


Chester, Pa. 


L. G. Balfour Company 


R. Charles Simmonds 


ATTLEBORO, MASSACHUSETTS 


Picture Frame Maker 


Manufacturers and Distributors of 


and Art Dealer 


Badges, Jewelry Novelties, Party 

Favors, Embossed Stationery, 

Programs, Plaques, 

Medals 


KODAKS AND SUPPLIES 

DEVELOPING AND PRINTING 

New Edison Diamond Disc 

Phonographs and Records 


Send for the 1927 Balfour Blue Book, the standard 
reference for jewelry and novelties. 


714 Welsh Street and Edgmont Ave. 
CHESTER, PA. 



May 15th. 

I didn't write my diary on the house party, because I was to busy. And I mean I am now 
another Kappa Sig sweetheart with a Kappa Sig pin. Of course, I took off my D.U. pin 
when people began to think Doc and I were really serious. And my boy friend wanted me to 
meet his mother. I am always quite intreeged at the idea of meeting gentlemen's mothers. 
Anyhow a kiss on the cheek makes you feel good, but a Kappa Sig pin lasts all summer. 
Oh — yes, we were playing golf, and we passed Prexie and he was actually beating someone 
on the golf course, and he was grinning all over. Prexie, with all his intellectual, social, and 
athletic accomplishments is really quite a remarkable man. 

May 19th. 

I have really got to begin studying. The Phi Delts are going to help me, for they are 
quite intellectual. I always like to improve my mind when I am with brainy people. 

May 21st. 

I was talking to a lot of Phi Sis today, and they tell me that Mr. Clothier is really quite 
a wonderful man to give the college such a fine auditorium, and I'm sure I for one ap- 
preciate Mr. Clothier's unselfish attitude. For I mean Mr. Clothier really is playing god- 
father to the college, for every thing we need he gives us. 



?^^ZcYO^ 



FRIENDS' 

CENTRAL SCHOOL 

SYSTEM 

EIGHTY-THIRD YEAR OPENS 

AtOVERBROOK: High School 

Thorough College preparatory and 

general courses 

BOYS and GIRLS 

Separate Departments 

ELEMENTARY DEPARTMENT, including 
KINDERGARTEN at OVERBROOK 

Country Day Plan; Campus and Athletic Fields; 
1 8 acres; modern equipment, new gymnasium, 
specialists faculty, wholesome and homelike at- 
mosphere; convenient bus service 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS: 

35th St. & Lancaster Ave., West Philadelphia 
Greene Street, above School Lane, Germantown 

BARCLAY L. JONES, Ph. D.. Principal 
Overbrook, Pa. 



I. MILLER CO. 

Beautiful Shoes 




1225 Chestnut Street 
Philadelphia 




THE MEDIA 
BOOT SHOP 



Paul L. Clark 

No. Five East State Street 
Media, Pa. 



?mAXCYO^ 



5% WITH SAFETY! 

That is your assurance when you buy our 
Mortgage Trust Certificates. They are issued 
in denominations of $100.00 and upwards, 
checks for the interest being mailed every six 
months. Principal and interest guaranteed by 
this Company. Write for folder. 



"Twenty-four Years of Tested Service ' 

CENTRAL TRUST 
AND SAVINGS COMPANY 



MAIN OFFICE 

Market at Fourth Street 

for 24 years 

"The Bank Where You Feel at Home" 



PHILADELPHIA broad street office 

Broad at Spring Garden Street 





Lotuff Brothers 
IMPORTERS 

Madeira Hand Embroidery 
Filet, Venetian and Irish Laces 

LADIES' UNDERWEAR 


COMPLIMENTS 


36 SO. EIGHTH STREET 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bel! Phone, Lombard 2481 


OF A 

FRIEND 


Vanity Fair 
Studio 




^0 per cent, discount 

to Students 




1 63 1 Chestnut St. 
Philadelphia 



TiALCYO^ 



THE DEVON PARK HOTEL 

DEVON, PA. 

Known for its comforts and good food 

The management is now prepared to accept spring and summer bookings 

European Rates — Single, %z to $5 per day. Double, $4 to .fS per day 
American Plan — Single, $6 to $9 per day. Double, %ix to $18 per day 
Special weekly and monthly rates quoted upon request 

ROBERT THORMANN, Managing Director 



THE FEDERAL 


STERLING 


INCOME TAX 


12,16-18 Walnut Street 


By ROLAND R. FOULKE 

0/ the Philadelphia Bar 


COATS 




SUITS - DRESSES 


A logical exhaustive presentation of 
the Federal Income Tax. The only 


For the School Girls 


textbook on the subject which 
points out the underlying principles. 


Millinery - Bags - Novelties 


Price $12.00 per copy 
All charges prepaid 


■^BC?^ 




IMPORTANT NOTICE 


The Foulke Tax Service 


To girls of the Swarthmore College 


505 Chestnut Street 


we offer a 10 per cent discount on 
all cash purchases made at this 


Philadelphia, Penna. 


store of regular priced merchandise 



MORRIS P. LEWIS 
Treasurer 



Lombard 7966 
Main 5940 



Noel Printing Company 



Incorporated 



1 1 2-1 14 North Seventh Street 
Philadelphia 




ee Hundred and 




3^\lcy6^ 



The Sho\vs 



Now, the idea of this is to give the 
names of some of the New Yawk shows a 
little local color. Maybe you've seen 
something like this before (we have), 
but what the ? 

"Saturday's Children" — Chuck Hadley 

and Dick Moore. 
"The Barker" — Custy Barnes. 
"Broadway" — The Asphaltum. 
"The Desert Song" — Mixed Fruit! (a 

low pun, indeed.) 

"The Red Lily"— (Whoa!) 
"The Constant Nymph" — Pat Robison. 
"The Constant Wife" — Her sister. 
"The Dark" — The Library at midnight. 
"Lady Alone" — Sis Tily (for how long?) 
"The Squall" — Kappa Sig meeting. 
"Oh, Please!" — Bring me a dish of bran. 
"Oh, Kay"— See John Keed. 
"Tommy" — Best, Lightfoot, Rathmell, 

Foster, Moore, Brown, Hallowell, 

Sharpies, Nicely. 
"Trial Marriage" — Several soon. 
"The Devil in the Cheese" — McBride. 
"The Noose" — German exam. 
"An American Tragedy" — A Saturday 

class. 

"The Nightingale" — Becky Hathaway. 
"Tw^o Girls Wanted" — Down at the 
table party. 

"The Wild Man of Borneo" — Hallowell. 
"The Ramblers" — Fix and Fred Taylor. 
"The Play's the Thing" — Take the One- 
Act Play course. 

"Honor Be Damned" — She's mine! 
"I Told You So" — She went Kappa. 
"Yours Truly" — Raymond Walters, 
Dean. 

"Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" — Mary 
Ann Ogden. 

"Praying Curve" — The walk to the 
Meeting House. 



SORCUSS'S 

The Shop of Distinction 
Market Street 

between Fifth and Sixth 

Chester, Pa. 



THE 

Marot Flower Shop 

3 1 5 Dickinson Ave. 

Cut Flowers, Plants and Baskets 

BOUQUETS MADE TO ORDER 

Flowers Telegraphed 

PHONE SWARTHMORE 5 54 

GRAY & COMPANY 

Real Estate 
Insurance 

Pennsylvania Bank Building 
CHESTER, PA. 



inio 



1^1 



c, InCo 



ATI 



STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 



No Matter What You Order 



Whether it is a stick or a carload we can deliver in record time. 
Complete stock, modern mill equipment, and a fleet of motor 

trucks all play their parts. 

Distributors of "RITTER" BRAND OAK FLOORING 

Beaver Wall-Tile Board Vulcanite Roofing 

Celotex Insulating Lumber 

Sheetrock 

CHAS. F. FELIN & CO., Inc. 

Main Office, Yard and Mill at 

YORK ROAD & BUTLER STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 



Chester Cadillac 



Cadillac ^ LaSalle 



Edgemont Avenue 

at 

Fourth Street 



CHESTER, PA. 



PHONES 

Service Station Sales Room 

3205W 1023 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF A 

FRIEND 



^ALCYO^ 



Harry W. Lang 

Swarthmore Alumnus, with 

Hardwick dC Magee 
Company 

Manufacturers and Retailers 

Rugs and Carpets 



Ransom^Barton Co. 

Quality Kitchen 
Equipment 



Direct from our own mills 


For 


<■ 


Institutions 




Colleges 


Oriental Rugs 


Schools 


Summer Floor Coverings in 


Hotels 


all the Popular Weaves 


Etc. . 


Linoleums 




0- 

Retail Department 


1 2 1 1 Race Street 


I220 Market Street 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Philadelphia 




HOWARD IHYNGE 


H. H. FOUSE, 96 


PRINTING CO. 


5228 Walnut St. 


Commercial Printers 
Bookbinders 


Tires, Rims, Wheels 


308-3 10 Madison Street 


VULCANIZING 


CHESTER, PA. 


Service that Satisfies 



HIRES, CASTNER & HARRIS, INC. 
ENGINEERS 

Designers and Builders of 

AUTOMATIC MACHINERY 

Industrial and Research Engineers 

SHOPS: OFFICE: 

2518 Morris Street mo Land Title Bldg. 

PHILADELPHIA 



Three Hundred and Fifty-eighl 





COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

DAVID L. VAUGHAN 



Wi iams,.Jarne^ 


H. M. McCoy 


& Company 


Stetson Hats 




Men's 


* 


Furnishings 


Anthracite 




COAL 


II 


Bituminous 
A. 




Drexel Building 


525 Market Street 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Chester, Pennsylvania 




Three Hundred and Fifty-nine 




^ALCYO^ 



^TRAVEUNC COCKW 



SWARTHMORE 

NEWS STAND 

Magazines Cigars 

Candy 



Cars for Hire 



Day— Swarth 580 PHONE Night— Swarth 694 



HARRY G. WILLIAMS 
& CO. 

Coal & Coke 



DREXEL BUILDING 
PHILADELPHIA 



Pennypacker 5260 



AUTO DELIVERY 



THE JEFFERSON DYE WORKS, Inc. 



Cleaners and Dyers 



BLANKETS 



RUGS CURTAINS 



DRAPERIES WEARING APPAREL 



107 SOUTH TWELFTH STREET - PHILADELPHIA 

Plant and Office: 240-42 South Twelfth Street 



Page Three Hundred and Sixty 



^HALCYON 



MABELLE L. McKIEE 

Gallagher Building 
7th and Sproul Streets, Chester, Penna. 

Sports, Tailored and Dinner 
DRESSES 

FOR THE COLLEGE GIRL 
in all the new shades and modes 

$16.75 to $69.50 

LINGERIE JEWELRY NOVELTIES 



ff 



MILLARDS 



yy 



THE SHOP OF SENSIBLE PRICES 

Paris, New York, Philadelphia 
Baltimore, Atlantic City, Wilmington 

Frocks and Gowns 

for every occasion and 
every type 

Coats 

that are both Luxurious and 
Practical 

MILLINERY and HOSIERY 

at Sensible Prices 

1337 CHESTNUT ST. 
127 SO. 13TH ST. 

' and "Millards^ Annex 
1026 CHESTNUT ST. 



PALMER'S 
FLOWER SHOP 

WELSH STREET 

Next to Chester Club 

Corsages - Table Decorations 
Designing 

PHONE CHESTER 436? 



viBLL, CHIEF, HERE'S 
THE S-eCRET OF OUfi, 

success! THEy sui^e 

Do PI{QX)UC£ THE uot^q^ 

1 q-f^ee>y !j — 



THAT U/AS 
EAi^y COMPARfP 
To SELL/n/^- 

TH£ Book to 

ThiE STUOENTJ' 



A F 



For Satisfaction in Quality and Service 

TRY 

Highland Dairy Products Co/s 

MILK AND CREAM 

ASK OUR DRIVERS TO CALL OR 'PHONE CHESTER 934 



Page Three Hundred and Sixty-one 



S^ALCYO^ 



T^^^k^ 

Sutidhmore, p^^lPmA m Jenr 




MRS. SUE D. ROGERS SWARTHMORE, PA. 

"With Compliments and Best Wishes" 



The Swarthmore Shop 

Men's Haberdashery 

Ladies' Specialties 



411 Dartmouth Avenue Swarthmore, Pa. 

Of}posite the Town Hall 




Banking Service 

to be Worth While 

must help you succeed. Your bank 
should be the ' ' Lansdowne National , ' ' 
where service is actuated by the offi- 
cers' keen desire to help every cus- 
tomer succeed — thereby furthering 
still more the bank's success as well. 
We would welcome your banking 
business and assure you here of a 
service that is progressive, construc- 
tive, based upon a spirit of cordiality 
and helpfulness. 

LANSDOWNE 
NATIONAL BANK 

Under U. S. Government 
Supervision 



Rittenhouse 8992 

VAUGHN T. BORNET 

Engineer and Contractor 

STRUCTURAL STEEL AND ORNAMENTAL IRON 

1713 Sansom Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Race zt 





THE 




Hartford Sterling 




Company 


COMPLIMENTS 


LANSDOWNE, PENNA. 


OF 


Makers of 


Thomas Somerville 


The Best Silver Plated 




HOLLOW WARE 




on the Market 




TROPHIES OF THE BEST DESIGN 




AND WORKMANSHIP 



SPACE COMPLIMENTARILY 
RESERVED 



Ask Me Another — Answers to Quizz Number Thirteen 

1 — A Latin expression for Moral Turpitude. 

2 — The same. 

3— Yes. 

4— R.U.J. Walking. 

5 — An animal. 

6 — An estuary is that which doesn't happen very often, but when it does, it does. 

7 — A wet smack on a blind date. 

8 — Satisfactorily. 

9 — And why. 
10 — ^Tw^o dollars a quart. 
11— I do. 
12—1 do. 

13 — The other way. 
14 — Wine, -women and song. 

15 — One dollar. (Eighty-five cents is near enough.) 
16 — That all depends upon the weather. 
17 — What I'd be if they were what they should be. 
18 — "Let the mind be lightened." 
19 — Because Mrs. Brooks is. 

20 — "My dear Prexy, you should make out an hour plan schedule." Oh, you know why. 
21 — A kind of an oyster. 
22 — His lodge. 

23 — To support the feature section of the Halcyon. 
24 — An Eisteddfod held by the people of Wales. 



Higher Education 



(Continued from page 345^ 

He tosses his bag backward over his head. It lands on the desk where it opens auto- 
matically. The professor removes great pads of dirty yellow paper from the bag and turns 
to the class, smiling evilly. "When I went to yell," he says, and crossing to the travelling 
rings, he swings back and forth over the heads of the class, unmercifully showering them 
with sheets of the hideously colored paper. 

"I want you, on these papers," says the professor, as he does a cut-off, and gracefully 
catches the trapeze, "to give me some idear of the day's assignment. Just what was the Roman 
villar, and why?" He exits right with a series of flip-flops. The members of the class who 
have not already filled their papers with pictures of battleships and chorus girls, begin to 
draw their conceptions of a bacchanalian revel. 

The professor re-enters wiping suspicious white suds from his lips. He limbers up with a 
pair of Indian clubs and leaps to the trapeze. He begins to swing. "Green scum to Calvin 
Coolidge," he shouts, and falls backward from his perch. The class gasps, but he catches 
himself by his toes, and continues swinging, his head down, while a malicious grin over- 
spreads his face. The class is uproarious in their applause. With a deft twist of his body, 
he drops to the floor, landing by some miracle on his feet. He turns on the portable radio 
set contained in his overnight-bag and performs a most creditable toe-dance on the desk. 
The bell interrupts the performance. The class files out singing "The Battle Hymn of the 
Republic." The professor trots to his shower. 



Page Three Hundred and Six/y-fo 



I^ALCYWT 



BELL PHONE SPRUCE 1 540 



MUENCH 



ESTABLISHED 1S95 



MAKER, EXPERT REMODELER, D\'ER, BLEACHER AND 
RENOVATOR OF MEN'S AND WOMEN'S 



HATS 



STRAW AND PANAMAS CLEANED AND BLOCKED 
LET US SOLVE YOUR HAT PROBLEM— NOW IS THE TIME 



AT YOUR SERVICE 
MR. JAMES STOTT MR. ARTHUR NEUMANN 



1537 FILBERT STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 



SPEAR 

Since iS;6 

We can Furnish HEA 1 for all Purposes 
ELECTRIC REFRIGERATION (KELVINATOR) 

Your Inquiries are Solicited 

JAMES SPEAR STOVE AND HEATING COMPANY 

RiT. 7044 1823 Market St., Philadelphia race 1629 



ELLIS GLANTZ 

A Wonderful Traveling Bag 
that retails for $10.00 

Bag is made of surface stock 
leather in the hand-boarded 
and cobra grain leather welted 
edges, heavy brass hardware, 
hand sewn frame lined in 
leather in the 18 inch size. 
Colors are black and brown. 

SOLD AT 

Strawbridge &Z Clothier 




^UM e| itu 'Better C^reAit 
TfiMT. -2=. 5ie{«At 

1730 6 ftfiotnutSt 
Qrhiuulclpnxa, va^ 

We Store Furs 



^alcyon" 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



A FRIEND 



Offices and Salesrooms — San Francisco, Los Angeles, Minnesota, Boston 



FISHER & KEENER 

Manufacturers of 

HIGH GRADE SUIT CASES AND TRAVELING BAGS 

442-44-46 N. Thirteenth Street, Philadelphia. Pa. 
For sale by Strawbridge & Clothier 



Special Offer to Students 

6 of our $35.00 per dozen 
photos for $4.00 

One glossy print free for reproduction 

AMBASSADOR STUDIO 

Photographs of Distinction 

153; Chestnut Street 

Spruce 7630 Open Sundays, 1 1 to 4 



Compliments of 

Delaware 
County Electric Co. 

CHESTER. PA. LANSDOWNE, PA. 
MEDIA. PA. 



Page Three Hundred and Six/y-six 



l^HALCYON 





FLORIANA 




CANDY COMPANY 


Maddock & Co. 


"Flavor wins Favor" 




Quality Hard and Filled 




Candies, Cream Mints, Mint Fluffs, 




KoKo Shred Bars 


Machinists' Tools 






26 SOUTH BANK STREET 


Manufacturers' Supplies 


PHILADELPHIA. PENNA. 




Established 1837 Incorporated 1919 




Robert Shoemaker & Co. Inc. 




Wholesale Druggists 




Manufacturers of 




Pure Powdered Drugs 


42 North Sixth Street 


and Spices 


Philadelphia 


N. E. Cor. Fourth and Race Streets 




Philadelphia 



June 6th. 

Today was a really wonderful commencement, but I felt like losing all my poise, and 
weeping to see all my lovers graduating from college. Really, it's too terrible to think about 
but I suppose it's the result of fate. And next year 
I will have to get myself some new boy friends. But 
Doc said he would be my boy friend next year, and he 
asked me to wear his D.U. pin again, so I felt better. 
He said I could have it as long as I want it, and he hoped 
I'd keep it forever. I mean I really am very fond of Doc. 
And now, having told all the events of college, I -will 
end my diary. I hope no one reads it, because it's so 
personal, and someone not knowing all about my brain 
and charm might not understand. So now I mean I will 
leave off thinking about Swarthmore — except for the 
D.U. pin. I mean a kiss on the lips makes you feel good, 
but a D.U. pin lasts forever. 

'.'A kiss on the lips" 





Three Hundred and Sixty-seven 





Ik Greystone Swimming Lakes 

Patronized by the best class of society. Bathing, sight- 
seeing and fresh air free. Swarthmore girls frequent in 
summer. Most of them can be seen at this time. Must 
not disturb buds or flowers. Hunting and fishing not 

allowed. 

"GREYSTONE," PA. 



Gowns-Coats- Hats 


'I'he 
F. H. White Company 


13 12 Walnut Street 


Manufacturers of 


Philadelphia 


. • Fine Luggage 


Exclusive Models in 


* •*• 


the Reigning Mode 




for all Occasions and 
for Every Require- 
ment. 

After September i 
at iqoS Walnut Street 


PHILADELPHIA OFFICE 

40-50 N. SIXTH STREET 

NEW YORK OFFICE BOSTON OFFICE 

295 Fifth Avenue 52 Chauncey Street 


Compliments 0/ 




Federal Match Corporation 


COMPLIMENTS 


Makers of 

High Quality 


OF 

A FRIEND 


Strike Anywhere Matches 






Three Hundred and Sixty 




^ALCYO^ 



NASH 

Leads the World in Motor Car Value 



MEDIA NASH CO. 

2 E. State St. 
Media, Pa. 

A GOOD OPENING FOR STUDENT SALESMEN 



LANSDOWNE NASH CO. 

62 E. Baltimore Ave. 
Lansdowne, Pa. 



The great majority of the rich people of today were 
the children of the poor people of a generation ago 

START NOW AND SAVE 

THE SPRINGFIELD NATIONAL BANK 

Springfield, Delaware County, Penna. 




PENNSYLVANIA MORTGAGE 
GUARANTEE COMPANY 



536 WIDENER BUILDING 



FOR SAFE INVESTMENTS 



^ALCYON 



Geo. D. Wetherill & Co., Inc. 

Paint and Varnish Mfrs. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
MEMPHIS, TENN. 



CAMDEN, N. J. 



"^flying is fascinating^ 
FYXat PITCAIRN FIELD 

EASTON ROAD, HALLOWELL, PA. 

J miles above Willow Grove 

Here is maintained a fleet of ten modern planes and a crew of expert pilots. 
Pitcairn Aviators carried last year in comfort and safety, over ten thousand 
passengers. Take a ride in aPitcairn plane — a novel and delightful experience. 

PITCAIRN FLYING SCHOOL 

with headquarters at Pitcairn Field, the largest commercial field in the East, 
trained, in iqib, seventy-three students. If you are interested in the new 
profession of the Twentieth Century, write for our illustrated booklet. 

PITCAIRN AVIATION, INC. 

LAND TITLE BLDG., PHIL.^DELPHI.^ 



FRANCIS J. DOYLE 

REALTOR 



857 East Allegheny Avenue 
Philadelphia 



Page Three Hundred and Seventy 




3©xiilG 

iTia&oml'Qaiik 

Kensington Ave. & Huniingdon St 




Daniel Webster said: 

"You are prosperous, you are happy, you are 
grateful. The fire of liberty burns brightly 
in your hearts, while duty and the law 
restrain it from bursting forth in wild and 
destructive conflagration. Cherish liberty, 
as you love it; cherish its securities, as you 
wish to preserve it. Maintain the Consti- 
tution which we labored so painfully to 
establish and which has been to you such 
a source of inestimable blessings. Be true 
to God, to your country, to your state. Do 
your duty. Then shall that Almighty power 
which so graciously protected us, and which 
now protects you, shower its everlasting 
blessings upon you and your posterity !" 



Intejrest on yt oy 
SavingsAccounts tt ^ 

OPEN MON. ©• FBI. NIGHTS 6 "to 9 



Three Hundred and Seventy-one 



Thomas L. Briggs 
& Sons 

"Everything in 
Sporting Goods" 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT TO COLLEGE 
STUDENTS 



7th and Welsh Sts. 
CHESTER, PA. 





CRANDALL 

TRANSPORTATION 

COMPANY 




Parlor Car Equipment 



MARCUS HOOK, PENNA. 

PHONE CHESTER 41 1 



BORDEN'S 

THE IMPROVED 

MALTED MILK 



A GENERAL HEALTH FOOD 
AND REFRESHING DRINK 



NOW AIN'T THAT A H — OF A WAV TO 
DO IT? But after all, what this 

COLLEG-E NEED-S IS A KARN QOOP 




^ALCYON 



GIRARD LIFE 

Insurance Company 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Issues all standard forms of policies, on both Par- 
ticipating and Non-Participating plans. 

Disability benefits. 

All Participating policies in addition to the annual 
Guaranteed Premium Reduction, provide for liberal 
annual dividends with a post mortem dividend in 
event of death between periods. 

All policies contain the most liberal non-forfeiture 
benefits, and no travel or occupation restriction. 

College men about to enter business life will do well 
to investigate our liberal Agency Contract. 



NATHAN T. FOLWELL 

President 



ALBERT SHORT 

zd V. P. &/ Secretary 



J^ALCYO^ 



RICHARD T. DOONER 

PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHS 




1822 



CHESTNUT STREET 



^?LCYO^ 



Standard " Coosa ^Thatcher Company 

MERCERIZED YARNS 



CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 





E. A. WRIGHT CO. 


^oost ::or t le Dig 


ENGRAVERS, 


PRINTERS. STATIONERS 


o 


For Colleges and Schools 


o 


Specialisls in 




Fraternity and School Stationery 




Dance Programs and Dance Favors 




Bonds and Stock Certificates 


SWARTHMORE 


Commencement Invitations 
Wedding Invitations 




Class Rings and Pins 


AND 


Class Day Programs 




Business Stationery 


SUPPLEE 


School Catalogs 
Diplomas 


ICE CREAM 


•S J- 




Our facilities are the most modern, and we offer 


"'noiice the flavor 


vou the advantages that we enjoy through the 




strength of our fiftv-four years rigorous main- 




tenance of a peerless standard 


AGENCY 


-1 f • 




Salesrooms. Offices and Factorv 


AT THE COLLEGE 


Broad and Huntingdon Sts. 




Philadelphia Pennsylvania 



BARCLAY WHITE & CO. 

INCOB.POB,ATED l^lj 

bUILDER.5 

PlilLADELPMIA 



O^lieffHneJRnot J& 



Red <£i«f Blue 



°1 1927GRANnTE AlUanceHighSchiooU,^ ^^, 



^. G«.v« ^^|B2^,^ol 1927GRANnTE AlUanceHlg 



^. 












Ajmuai 



-«>% 



*"-^cP««^f:>;.r3."''"':is%r' 



<^jy*?csfe^;.R<.t<^''"'° MASSILLDNIAl 

~ ^^ ^ MassiUon High Si 



"<r^V 






^tt, 






«sJ 



.%. 



>> 



j^Vst^ 



a^ School ^ 



^^,\t^ Ne-ca-Hi 

New CastlCpdygh Schoo 



:?i^^ i^f> 



S-.^ 






AlLECHB*rtefalOH 5^ 






Ci» 









<5e^|^.-^NlBnH®?J 



OHIO 



4»5?" 









.'Sio, 






iiversi 



^o<^ 



Sar 

HIGH 



^, 



9)fe Canto:n 



s.'SS=^^^ 



'A-:: 



'~Zyutmc!hve ulnnuak^fthm their'Budgets 






ots^' 



N*'^ 



:g(^ 



^-E^r^^Sfe^^^^""'''' 



CANDLl 






x^^^ 



.tK? 



W.'o^' 



^0^ 



.^,.>°" Ciiia 



>o^ 



WYOMI 



^^^S 



^ 






^l^V^oO-' 



^uf>' 



OMING SEMlNARY^fli'^^ti^'^ \^ 

r 









.>o 



Pa^e Three Hundred and Seventy-six 



TiALCYO^ 




Sam. Drayman 

shoe Store&Repair Shop 

Work Neatly Done 

417 Dartmouth Avenue 
Swarthmore, Pa. 



W. A. LEONARD 

LANSDOWNE 


BEAUTIFUL 
NEW HOMES 

at Chestnut Hill 


Flowers for all Occasions 


FREE DELIVERY 
Lans. 170 


$13,500 to $15,000 

Situated in 8100 Block, Eastern 
Avenue, i Square from Willow 
Grove and Stenton Avenues 

Built by 

J. p. VAN CLEAVE 

Builder of Homes Beautiful 
Inspection invited by 

HAROLD C. IRVIN, INC. 

2o5 South Seventh Street 


COMPLIMENTS OF 
MAC and EL 



FRIENDS' INTELLIGENCER 

Contains 

Current News of Meetings Friends' Service Notes 

Editorials and Articles on Topics of Interest 

SUBSCRIBE NOW— $2.50 a year 

FRIENDS' INTELLIGENCER 

140 North Fifteenth Street Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



J^pOXYO^ 




/^ W \ RINTING^ as age-old as it is^ is little under- 
m--^ stood by the man of the streets. The words 
M font^ chase, platen, make-ready, pica, Goudy 
or Bodoni mean no more to him than the words lapa- 
rotomy, polyuria, myopia or cholelithiasis. This is re- 
grettable in a way because the art of printing is a fas- 
cination; and if you could chase this man in to us, he 
would see that fascination. 

He would see, now, a blank piece of paper. Then — 
presto! — he would have words and pictures to make 
him want the things they tell about and show. 

Ours is the business of preparing and producing this 
type of printed matter. There is ability here to take your 
product and to present it to the man of the streets in a 
printed form that will catch his eye, absorb his interest, 
stir his desire and urge him to action. But first we must 
be assured that you want ideas and sales, and second 
we invite you to visit us and see just how we function. 



FTiANKLIN P%i:NJINg QO, 

514-20 LUDLOW STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 



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